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Program Information
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Fall 2017: World Scholars - Rome, Italy
August 22, 2017 - December 09, 2017
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.
Meetings
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
06/19/2017 8:30 AM - 5:00 PMTrabant University CenterExclusive World Scholars New Student Orientation for students & families. Students unable to attend the June 19 event must attend an alternate Orientation on July 17. If unable to attend on either date, students MUST email Amy Greenwald Foley to schedule a meeting date and time. World Scholars should NOT register for another summer NSO date.
07/17/2017 8:30 AM - 4:00 PMUniversity of DelawareStudents unable to join us on Monday, June 19 must attend Orientation on this alternate date.
Program Notes
This program's deadline has been changed to 06/13/2017.
World Scholars - Rome is an exclusive opportunity for a select group of students admitted to the University of Delaware for fall enrollment as part of the World Scholars Program. During the fall semester, you will earn a full semester of UD credits while studying in one of the world's most culturally and historically rich cities -- Rome -- at our partner institution, John Cabot University.

On June 19, World Scholars and parents will attend orientation on UD's Delaware campus. Throughout the day, participants will review pre-departure travel plans, learn more about JCU's campus in Rome, and understand expectations for the first semester as a college student. All students will be required to complete the University's alcohol.edu online educational program prior to summer's end.
Program Description

Study in Rome, “la città eterna,” home to more than 2,000 years of history and over three million Italians living in the midst of it all. This UD semester program is hosted by John Cabot University (JCU), an accredited, degree-granting liberal arts institution enrolling over 800 students originating from across the U.S. and the world. JCU’s location in the trendy, bohemian Trastevere neighborhood not far from the Vatican and the banks of the Tiber make it ideally situated for students wishing to live and learn amidst a unique blend of the ancient and the contemporary.

John Cabot’s facilities include the Guarini campus with its patio and courtyard, whose entry gate dates from the third century, and the Tiber campus, just a ten-minute walk away. Both contain classrooms and offices and are equipped with wireless internet. JCU’s status as a full-fledged secondary educational institution means that it offers an array of services similar to those of a small U.S.-based campus and to which UD students have access, for example student clubs, sports activities, library, cultural and social events, counseling services, and a residence life staff.

Courses are taught by JCU’s approximately 100 international faculty, many of whom were educated in the United States. Instructional methods and grading are based on the U.S. system. Instruction takes place in English except for Italian (ITAL) courses. UD students will take a subset of courses together and may then choose additional options from a menu of recommended courses. Some of the courses include out-of-class experiences around Rome to take advantage of the city’s historic and artistic resources, which may require an additional fee.

UD World Scholars will live in a residence hall on the campus of John Cabot University, and will have upperclass residence assistants living with them. Students in this program will also benefit from the time and expertise of an additional staff member in Rome who will be assigned exclusively to the UD cohort. This individual will serve as 24/7 staff support to the students and as a liaison between the University of Delaware and faculty and staff at our partner institution, John Cabot University. This staff member will also gather students on a weekly basis for excursions for special opportunities and excursions that take advantage of this incredible geographic location.

The program fee covers housing, medical insurance, some meals, airport transfers in Rome, orientation week activities, numerous excursions throughout the fall, and full access to all JCU facilities and activities. It does not include the cost of an Italian visa or Permit to Stay; students should budget approximately $200 for these documents.

NOTE: The program fee does NOT include airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Rome on August 22. For planning purposes only, airfare is estimated at $1,400. Upon acceptance into the program students will be instructed when to arrive at the "Fiumicino" or Leonardo da Vinci airport in Rome for pick-up. Students who wish to travel with the UD representative, must book the following flights via Student Universe or directly with the airline:

  • 8/21/2017, American Airlines #718, departs PHL 6:30 p.m. & arrives Rome 8/22. 9:10 a.m.
  • 12/9/2017, American Airline #719, departs Rome 11:35 a.m. & arrives PHL 3:50 p.m.
Program Courses
Instruction takes place in English except for Italian (ITAL) courses.

UD students will be required to co-enroll in one course as World Scholars
POSC 240    Introduction to Global Politics

Students will then be able to select an additional four courses from the recommended courses below.  Academic advising and course registration will take place prior to World Scholars summer New Student Orientation at the University of Delaware campus in Newark, Delaware. Students will be contacted by their academic advisors to schedule a time for virtual advising.  In the meantime, students are encouraged to review those courses required for their majors, which can be found in the online course catalog.
ART 180-072: Photographic Approaches (3 credits)
Introduces the basics of photography as a way to communicate ideas emphasizing content, composition, and technique. Examines contemporary artists and historic movements through research, gallery visits and lectures. Using a digital camera and visual editing software students create, edit and critique images.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors and non-minors only.
ART 231-072: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
An exploration of beginning oil painting methods and material through both traditional and conceptual painting ideas, providing the student with a foundation for discovering their unique potential for self-expression.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 233-070: Drawing as Study (3 credits)
This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199-071: Topic in Art History: Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology (3 credits)
This is a survey of Greek art and archaeology with a focus on the period ca. 1000-146 BC. The course begins with an introduction to the discipline of Classical Archaeology and presents an overview of developments in the Paleolithic period and the Bronze Age; most of the course focuses upon the period between ca. 800 and 146 BC. Analysis of architecture and art are merged with an understanding of historical trends and Greek mythology. Students are introduced to all aspects of material culture: architecture, sculpture, painted pottery, and objects of daily life. A primary focus of the course is how material culture is interpreted in the light of daily life – politics, social organization, religion, mythology, trade. Analysis of architecture and art are merged with an understanding of historical trends and Greek mythology.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199-072: Topic in Art History: Art and Architecture of Imperial Rome (3 credits)
The course focuses on the vibrant period between the 2nd century BC and the 4th century AD, which constituted the height of Roman power within a sprawling and culturally diverse Empire. It follows an overarching chronological format complemented by thematic investigations focused on particular media, locations, or traditions. In this way, portraiture and statues; mosaics; relief works; and wall painting will all be discussed for their intrinsic artistic value, for their stylistic development over time, and as shaped by the particular outlook of their patrons and their intended viewership. The course addresses themes like the impact of Greek art, elite and non-elite art, and what it meant to be 'Roman' in a multicultural empire.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199-070: Topic in Art History: Rome, Ostia, and Pompeii I (3 credits)
Rome, Ostia and Pompeii are three of the best preserved archaeological sites in the world. Through their study, we are able to comprehend the physical and social nature of Roman cities and how they transformed over the course of centuries. We explore the subjects of urban development, public and private buildings, economic and social history, and art incorporated into urban features (houses, triumphal monuments, etc.). In Rome, we focus primarily upon public buildings commissioned by Senators and Emperors: temples, law courts, theaters, triumphal monuments, baths. In Ostia, the port-city of Rome, we are able to experience many aspects of daily life: commerce, housing, religion, entertainment. Pompeii represents a well-to-do Republican and early Imperial period city which was influenced by the Greeks and Romans and preserves some of the most magnificent frescoes in the world. The course is conducted entirely on site, including a one-day excursion to Pompeii (equivalent to two class meetings).
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
COMM 245-072: Mass Communication and Culture Communication (3 credits)
The relationship between media and culture; how media affect culture (i.e., socialization and role modeling); and exploration of new forms of mass communication.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 101-071: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Introduces supply and demand concepts with basic economic graphs. Examines models of perfect and imperfect competition and determinants of production price and quantity. Covers microeconomic issues such as the effect of government regulation and environmental problems.
Prerequisite: MATH114, MATH115, MATH221, MATH241 or higher.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 103-071: Introduction to Macroeconomics: The National Economy (3 credits)
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ENGL 209-070: Introduction to the Novel (3 credits)
Representative masterworks of fiction, emphasizing those of Europe and America.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 210-070: Introduction to the Short Story (3 credits)
Study of short story as a narrative form, with readings from American and foreign short story traditions.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 217-070: Introduction to Film (3 credits)
Focuses on different techniques of acting, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound and color to assess how films encourage audiences to respond in the ways they do.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 324-071: Shakespeare (3 credits)
This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
FLLT 330-071: Varying Authors, Themes, and Movements: Italian Cinema (3 credits)
Study of modern Italian cultural history through cinema.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
FREN 105-070: French I - Elementary (4 credits)
Introduction to the French language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.

Notes: FREN 105, All sections are for students who have never studied French or who have taken 2 years or less of French in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
FREN 106-070: French II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Notes: FREN 106, All sections are for students who have taken 2 or 3 years of French in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
Prerequisite: PREREQ: FREN105
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Two to three years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
GREK 102: Elementary Ancient Greek II (3 credits)
Completion of elementary Greek.
Prerequisite: GREK101 or equivalent
HIST 101-070: Western Civilization to 1648 (3 credits)
Principal political, social, economic and cultural developments in Western civilization from late antiquity (3rd century A.D.) to middle of 17th century.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 341-070: Ancient Rome (3 credits)
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy. Focus will be on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course will examine the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period and the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’ to the rise and decline of the Empire. Readings in translation include the writings of Polybius, Cicero, Livy, Virgil, Suetonius, Tacitus, and Marcus Aurelius, with some consideration of Roman art and architecture.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ITAL 105: Italian I - Elementary (4 credits)
Introduction to the Italian language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
ITAL 106: Italian II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Completion of basic Italian. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: ITAL105 Two to three years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
LATN 101-070: Elementary Latin I (3 credits)
Prepares students to read ancient Roman literary works in the original language. Emphasizes building a basic vocabulary and acquiring essential grammar. Discussion of Roman culture and civilization.
MATH 115-070: Pre-Calculus (3 credits)
The various classes of functions and their graphs are explored. Function classes include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric. Skills and concepts needed for calculus (MATH221) are emphasized.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: MATH010. Students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Only four credits from any combination of MATH113, MATH114, MATH115, MATH117, MATH127, MATH170 and MATH171 can count toward graduation.
MATH 221-074: Calculus I (3 credits)
Topics include functions, graphing functions, limits, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration, and techniques of integration. Business applications are emphasized.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: Requires two years of high school algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of precalculus, or MATH115, or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Credit cannot be received for both MATH221 and MATH241.
PHIL 102-072: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
An examination of such central philosophical problems as ethics, theories of knowledge, the nature of reality, philosophy of religion and political philosophy.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 301-070: Ancient Philosophy (3 credits)
Beginnings of Western science and philosophy. The pre-Socratics, Sophists, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
POSC 150-070: Introduction to American Politics (3 credits)
The foundations, principles and processes of American politics. Topics include the Constitution, political institutions (Congress, presidency, courts), parties, interest groups, campaigns, elections, public opinion and political participation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 240-070: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 270-070: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Introduction to key concepts and patterns in comparative politics. Topics include democratic processes and democratization, economic and political development, political institutions, and civil society. Cases from different parts of the world are examined to provide a grounding in comparative analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 285-070: Introduction to Political Theory (3 credits)
Basic introduction to political philosophy, organized not around particular historical periods or specific philosophers, but around some of the most important, enduring questions of political theory: What is the nature of the state? What are the obligations and responsibilities of citizens?
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 309-073: Political Culture by Country: Italy (3 credits)
Overview of the origins of the Italian republic, including reading through its constitution. Description of how its political system reflected the Cold War confrontation; examination of why and how it experienced dramatic changes at the beginning of the 1990's; observation and analysis of today’s main political competitors; discussion of the impact that soccer has had on Italian society
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Offered only in conjunction with travel abroad programs. May be taken twice for credit when countries vary.
PSYC 100-070: General Psychology (3 credits)
Introduction to the process of psychological science. Includes coverage of research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, abnormal behavior and treatment, developmental psychology, and social and personality psychology.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SPAN 105-070: Spanish I - Elementary (4 credits)
Introduction to the Spanish language and a development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.

Notes: SPAN 105, All sections are for students who have never studied Spanish or who have taken 2 years or less of Spanish in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: No Spanish background, two or fewer years of high school Spanish.
SPAN 106-070: Spanish II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Completion of basic Spanish. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: SPAN105
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Two to three years of high school Spanish acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
SPAN 107-070: Spanish III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, and reading texts of average difficulty.

 
Prerequisite: SPAN 106 or SPAN 111 or equivalent courses or permission of instructor.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
THEA 226-070: Fundamentals of Acting I (3 credits)
Exploration of basic elements of the actor's art and craft so as to deepen and broaden the experience of viewing the theatre. May utilize theatre games, basic text work, improvisation, and lecture/demonstrations
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
UNIV 373-019: Study Abroad - Rome, Italy (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Restrictions: Restricted to UD World Scholar Admits
Requirements
The Semester in Rome is offered exclusively to students admitted to start their studies at the University of Delaware for the fall semester 2017 as a designated World Scholar. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
Costs
Other important things to note:
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason.
Tuition and fees for the UD World Scholars Program align with other University of Delaware tuition and fees. Students pay two enrollment deposits by May 1 -- $500 to confirm enrollment at UD and $500 to confirm enrollment in the World Scholars Program. Both deposit amounts are deducted from the final University bill.

The $8300 World Scholars Program Fee includes room and board (housing and dining). In addition, the Program Fee includes mandatory student fees that enable World Scholars to utilize the facilities and services at our partner institutions. Finally, a portion of the Program Fee supports resources and services provided by the Institute for Global Studies (IGS). This includes insurance while abroad, staff accompaniment and support throughout the fall, excursions and events while the Scholars are abroad, and programs to be held when Scholars are on UD's campus. The one-time IGS portion of the program fee serves as the foundation for the resources and opportunities that World Scholars will receive for the duration of their four-year participation in the UD World Scholars Program.

Scholars should reference the financial package which they received from Undergraduate Admissions and Student Financial Services for their current and custom scholarship and need-based aid information. Tuition payments must be made in accordance with the University of Delaware tuition and fee payment schedule.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onJune 13, 2017
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $500.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Amy Greenwald Foley
Associate Director
302-831-3082
agfoley@udel.edu
Maryann Rapposelli
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-6448
mrap@udel.edu
File Downloads
Notarized Affadavit of Financial Support
"Consent to Travel for Minors" Form
UD World Scholar - Rome Approved Courses
World Scholars Packing List for Fall
Enrollment Checklist
Visa Checklist
Visa Application Example (Completed)
World Scholars Pre-Departure Handbook
Hotels & Restaurants near John Cabot University

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.




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