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Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[89]
Fall 2018: Akita, Japan
August 23, 2018 - December 22, 2018 (dates are tentative)

Meetings
Interest Meetings:
10/17/2017 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
10/20/2017 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
Program Notes
This program is highly competitive and will accept only a limited number of applicants. Interview appointments and acceptance decisions are at the discretion of the faculty director.
The host institution guarantees only six spots for UD students each fall semester. Though more than six students may be accepted, this is not guaranteed.
Program Description
Akita International University is a small public liberal arts college located in the historic city of Akita in Japan’s northwest, about a 4-hour bullet train ride from Tokyo. With the Sea of Japan to the west and mountains to the east, Akita is known for its natural beauty and hot springs. Akita city hosts several famous festivals throughout the year, and Akita Kanto Festival is one of the three major festivals in the Tohoku region.

Akita International University (AIU) is one of the very few universities in Japan where all of the content courses are taught in English. Its unique and highly specialized curricula of Global Business, Global Studies, and intensive Japanese language instruction attract students from around the world. Upon arrival students will take a Japanese placement exam which will determine the level of Japanese courses in which they are permitted to enroll.

International students are housed together with Japanese students in the on-campus dormitories, most likely in the Global Village Apartments. All first-year students are required to live on campus, which is a rarity in Japan, thereby providing many opportunities for interaction with native speakers. The AIU library is open 24 hours every day, and there is public transportation to the city center and to a large American-style shopping plaza.

Experiential Learning
Semester-long study abroad programs may offer opportunities for more immersive experiences such as internships or community service engagement. This program includes community service opportunities as offered through AIU. The university provides extensive off-campus activities, including community outreach opportunities, field trips, service-oriented clubs, and a home visit program, all designed to facilitate intercultural understanding and respect through true cultural and linguistic immersion experiences.

To find out more information about this program, see the interest meeting power point and the page of past participant tips at the bottom of this page. In addition, check out the UD Abroad blog posts from past participants.

The Institute for Global Studies cooperates with the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures on the administration of this program.

The Program Fee includes on-campus dormitory housing, dining hall meals for the first two weeks, the student activities fee, and mandatory personal liability and health insurance.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare or any airport transfer costs. The program officially begins when students arrive in Akita. Students will receive detailed travel instructions after acceptance, explaining how and where to purchase their plane ticket. See the Cost section below for estimate airfare. For this program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together. Students are responsible for any costs associated with their Japanese visa. After acceptance students will receive instructions from AIU regarding how to take advantage of AIU's pick-up service on the program's starting date.
ACCESSIBILITY: Participants with disabilities should know that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. But UD students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
Course instruction is in English, except for JAPN courses. All students take two 3-credit JAPN courses as per the course equivalency chart at the bottom of this page, and based on their performance on the placement exam. Students also take 6-11 additional credits of their choice in Japanese or English.

Note that course offerings are subject to change, as the host institution may make changes to its course offerings. Typically AIU publicizes its course schedule for fall in June or July.
ANTH 267: Prehistoric Archeology and Japanese Ethnicity (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANT 230 Prehistoric Archeology and Japanese Ethnicity
What is Japanese like? Is Japanese a homogeneous group? Who are indigenous people in the Japanese archipelago? This course is designed to explore these questions from archaeological and anthropological perspectives. We will discuss Japanese ethnicity through early writings on Japanese ethnicity in Meiji and Taisho periods, explore prehistoric archaeology and current developments of genetic studies in the Japanese archipelago and AsiaPacific basins, and trace Japanese history in the areas of immigration, religion, society, environment, and food.
BUAD 425: Current Issues in Global Business (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECN 343 Japanese Business Culture
Current topics and emerging issues in the changing global marketplace. May focus on regional issues, global business sectors, current issues in the globalization of business, or a combination of these.
COMM 263: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 250 Intercultural Communication
Communicative processes in other cultures as well as subcultures in the US will be discussed. Students will become more mindful and aware of their own cultural patterns as well. Difficulties in cross cultural communication will also be discussed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
ECON 342-075: Studies in International Economics: Contemporary Japanese Economy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECN 333 Contemporary Japanese Economy
Analysis of selected topics in International Economics, including international trade, international finance and the analysis of non-U.S. economies, with particular emphasis on the contemporary Japanese economy.
Prerequisite: ECON 101 and ECON 103
Restrictions: may be repeated once for credit when topics vary
ECON 342-076: Studies in International Economics: International Trade (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECN 320 - International Trade
Analysis of selected topics in International Economic, including international trade, international finance and the analysis of non-U.S. economies. This course provides an introduction to international trade theory and trade policy analysis in a combination of lecture and seminar format. Students will understand the nature of trade, the relationships among nations that trade with each other and will be able to critically analyze trade related international issues.
Prerequisite: ECON 101 and ECON 103
Restrictions: may be repeated once for credit if topics vary
EDUC 267-070: Education Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EDU 151 Education Systems
This course provides a wide-ranging introduction to education systems, with special reference to education in Japan. The emphasis is on examining both a broad range of key areas and participants’ own assumptions. This will provide a basis for developing a foundation for working as a practitioner in the future. Comparative approach will be used to engage with emerging educational issues as well as existing programs in Japanese education.
GEOG 228: Geography of China (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEO 240 Geography of East Asia
Introduces the physical, economic, cultural and political geography of China. Particular emphasis is placed on the diversity of physical environments, cultures, and economic activity within China.
HIST 138: East Asian Civilization: Japan (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 215 History of Pre-Modern Japan
A survey of major aspects of Japanese civilization, relating the past to the present.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
HOSP 267: Cultural Heritage Tourism (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 385 Cultural Heritage Tourism
This course is designed to familiarize student with the concept of heritage and tourism in rural societies. This course will deal with a wide range of cultural and natural heritages, and their strategic management plans for developing sustainable tourism. Based on classroom studies and field researches, students will collaborate on group presentations on cultural heritage tourism in the Tohoku region of Japan, including Akita prefecture.
JAPN 107-070: Japanese III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 205 Upper Elementary Japanese 205 & 231 Japanese Practice
Development of aural, oral, reading, and writing skills at the intermediate Japanese level, including continued practice in identifying and reproducing Kanji characters, handling a greater variety of formality levels, and verb forms. Media Center resources utilized.
Prerequisite: JAPN 106 or four years of high school Japanese
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 200
JAPN 200-070: Japanese Grammar and Composition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: See JAPN 107 & JAPN 205
Further study of Japanese grammar, kanji characters and reading and writing skills for communication. Emphasis on grammar, Kanji and essay writing.
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 107 or JAPN 205, depending on placement test results
JAPN 205-070: Japanese Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 206 Upper Elementary Japanese 206 & JPL 231 Japanese Practice
Practical use of Japanese by means of oral reports on a variety of topics including family, school, and work life. Emphasis on improvement of conversational skills for social situations which require different politeness levels, as well as grammatical and written competence.
Prerequisite: One of JAPN107, JAPN200, JAPN201, JAPN202, JAPN 206, or JAPN209
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 200
JAPN 208-071: Contemporary Japan I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 250 Intro. to Japanese Society
Introduction to contemporary Japan, its culture, people, way of life and issues confronting them. This course will offer an overview of contemporary Japanese society and culture from a sociological perspective. In social sciences and humanities, the portrayal of Japan as a homogeneous and closed society has recently been challenged by increased emphases on diversity and dynamism within its social organizations and people. Yet, you might still find some common patterns in this society, for which you might be eager to find an explanation. Are these patterns just a product of your preconceptions or can they be supported by empirical facts and data? Sociological theories and methods become handy when you seek to grasp commonalities and changing trends in various areas of a society. In this course, you will examine organizing principles of Japanese society at micro and macro levels while becoming familiar with methods of sociological analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
JAPN 208-070: Contemporary Japan I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 110 Sado Tea Ceremony & JAS 130 Kado Flower Arrangement
Introduction to contemporary Japan, its culture, people, way of life and issues confronting them.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
JAPN 208-072: Contemporary Japan I : Akita Rural Studies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 380 - Akita Rural Studies
Introduction to contemporary Japan, its culture, people, way of life and issues confronting them. The overall aim of this course is that students will 1) study research methods and research design, 2) understand the realities and social characteristics of rural Akita, 3) enhance critical and comparative analytical views of consider Japanese rural communities, and 4) consider potential solutions for sustainable rural community. Research teams consisted of both Japanese and international students tackle on their group research questions by focusing on Bangaku music and dance in Kayagasawa community. Student team research includes interview, questionnaire survey, and service learning. The course includes two parts to 1) understand theoretical perspectives on Japanese rural society and 2) conduct field research and analyze field data.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
JAPN 306-070: Practical Oral/Written Expression (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 300 Intermediate Japanese 300
Designed to increase fluency and vocabulary. Grammar review focuses on special problems
Prerequisite: three of JAPN200, JAPN201, JAPN202, JAPN205, JAPN206, or JAPN209; OR one of JAPN301, JAPN305, or JAPN355
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 355, Intermediate Japanese I
JAPN 355-070: Special Topics - Intermediate Japanese I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 300 Intermediate Japanese 300
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 306
JAPN 355-071: Special Topics: Upper Intermediate Japanese (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 305 Intermediate Japanese
Provides advanced instruction in Japanese grammar at the 400 level. Textbooks will provide a good basis for students to build grammar and discuss social issues such as marriage, illness, careers for women, and globalization. Students will also discuss issues using complementary materials chosen by the instructor (newspapers, magazines, television and so on).
Prerequisite: THREE of the following: JAPN200, JAPN 201, JAPN 202, JAPN205, JAPN206, JAPN209, or ONE of the following: JAPN301, JAPN 305, JAPN306.
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 455-073 - Intermediate Japanese II
May be repeated for credit three times when topics vary.
JAPN 366-070: Independent Study - Japanese Practice (1 credit) pass/fail
Provider Equivalent: JPL 331 Japanese Practice
At the beginning of the semester, students will receive guidance regarding the course and advice on creating a study plan. After deciding what to study and which materials might best support their particular needs/goals, students are required to spend 4 hours or more per week on their independent study. Although students receive guidance, ultimately they are free to choose study materials of interest/value to them, and it is their responsibility to reach their particular goals. Students and their instructors will have regular (frequency will be decided by each instructor) meetings where students report their progress, share problems and receive guidance from the instructor when necessary. Evidence of more than 35 hours of independent study and a satisfactory record of each student’s study must be submitted to the instructor by the end of the semester in order to pass the course.
JAPN 401: Using Japanese: Issues in Contemporary Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 310 Intercultural Perspectives on Japanese Society
This course is designed to acquaint students with the pragmatics of Japanese language, in particular with cultural contexts of its use and with typical patterns of thinking among Japanese people which for international students maybe unknown, and of which Japanese students may not be aware. Based on the experience gained in class activities and the discussion among the classmates representing different culture students will identify, discuss, and compare contextual issues involved in exemplary situations. Similar assignments will be given to analyze authentic situations or examples from one’s own experience. Since the course activities will be carried out in Japanese language, international students will get some assistance in understanding readings and other assignments, however, the focus will not be on the grammatical or vocabulary issues, but on the pragmatic aspects of language. Class activities will include discussions and presentations of individual work assigned as homework. Some field trips are included in the plan for this course to provide opportunities for making direct observation of communication pattern in various contexts and in authentic social environment.
Prerequisite: JAPN 301 plus one other 300-level Japanese course
JAPN 407-071: Kanji Consolidation (1 credit)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 382 Kanji Consolidation
This is a Kanji Consolidation course aimed mainly for students whose first language make use of Chinese characters (but not exclusively), or those who have built reasonable foundation of Kanji to learn effectively in their intermediate level courses. This course provides students with opportunities to learn and review Kanji introduced in elementary level classes, and to expand their knowledge of Kanji, in order to prepare for their study in the higher-intermediate level courses. In class, students practice reading and writing Kanji with several compounds used in daily life. They may also try to find interesting kanji used in signboards, menus, flyers, magazines, comics, TV and movie subtitles and homepages on the Internet, etc.
JAPN 407-072: Kanji Foundation (1 credit)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 381 Kanji Foundation
This is a Kanji Foundation course aimed mainly for students whose first language DOES NOT make use of Chinese characters (but not exclusively), or those who have not yet built reasonable foundation of Kanji to learn effectively in their intermediate level courses. This course provides students with opportunities to learn and review Kanji introduced in elementary level classes, and to expand their knowledge of Kanji, in order to prepare for their study in the higher-intermediate level courses. In class, students practice reading and writing Kanji with several compounds used in daily life. They may also try to find interesting kanji used in signboards, menus, flyers, magazines, comics, TV and movie subtitles and homepages on the Internet, etc
JAPN 408-100: Advanced Japanese (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 506 Advanced Japanese
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 455, Advanced Japanese
JAPN 408-070: English-Japanese Translation (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 442 English-Japanese Translation
This course requires students to translate mainly from English to Japanese and understand the differece between the two languages.
JAPN 408-071: Higher Intermediate Japanese (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 402 Higher Intermediate Japanese
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 455, Higher Intermediate Japanese
JAPN 408-072: Japanese-Chinese Translation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 521 Japanese-Chinese Translation
This course is for Chinese speakers who have an advanced level of Japanese language skill. Numerous skills necessary in the translation will be taught by investigating the differences and contrasts between Japanese and Chinese languages. We will take up the problems which are especially difficult for Chinese speakers. By using practical materials, we will explain which translation is most appropriate as a means of transmitting information. To enhance learning, students are required to do many in-class practices. After completing this course students will deepen their knowledge of Japanese language.
JAPN 408-073: Pronunciation (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 361 or JPL 461 Pronunciation
JAPN 408-074: Reading Comprehension I (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 390 Reading Comprehension
Restrictions: designed for students also taking JAPN 306 and 367
JAPN 408-075: Reading Comprehension II (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 391 Reading Comprehension
Restrictions: designed for students also taking JAPN 401 and 405
JAPN 408-076: Reading Comprehension III (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 394 Reading Comprehension
Restrictions: designed for students also taking JAPN 455 and 467, Intermediate Japanese
JAPN 408-077: Speaking (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 411 Speaking
This course is designed for students at the 400-level. Students will practice how to choose appropriate speech styles in different situations.
JAPN 408-078: Special Topics - Intermediate Japanese III (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 307 Intermediate Japanese
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 455-073, Intermediate Japanese III
JAPN 408-079: Writing (2 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 421 or JPL 581 Writing
This course is designed for students who have advanced level proficiency in Japanese and want to improve their writing skills. This course will focus on the development of academic writing skills. Students will learn basic rules and styles for academic paper writing and write their own papers on a wide range of topics.
JAPN 455-070: Selected Authors, Works Themes: Advanced Japanese (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 506 Advanced Japanese
At the beginning of the semester, students will receive guidance regarding the course and advice on creating a study plan. After deciding what to study and which materials might best support their particular needs/goals, students are required to spend 4 hours or more per week on their independent study. Although students receive guidance, ultimately they are free to choose study materials of interest/value to them, and it is their responsibility to reach their particular goals. There are a wide variety of study materials available at the Language Development & Intercultural Studies Center (LDIC), so utilizing LDIC is strongly recommended. Students and their instructors will have regular (frequency will be decided by each instructor) meetings where students report their progress, share problems and receive guidance from the instructor when necessary. Evidence of more than 35 hours of independent study and a satisfactory record of each student’s study must be submitted to the instructor by the end of the semester in order to pass the course.
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 408-100, Advanced Japanese
JAPN 455-071: Selected Authors, Works Themes: Higher Intermediate Japanese (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 402 Higher Intermediate Japanese
Although this course focuses on the development of all four skills; reading, writing, speaking and listening, emphasis will be placed on reading comprehension. Authentic materials may include newspaper articles on relevant social or political issues, short essays, and short articles from academic texts.
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 408-071, Higher Intermediate Japanese
JAPN 455-073: Selected Authors, Works, and Themes: Topics in Advanced Japanese (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL 307 Intermediate Japanese
Explores the major issues in translating a Japanese literary text into English, including synonym choice, literal versus loose translation, poetic license and the tense-aspect controversy. Students will find their own method of translation, balancing creative expression with accuracy and fidelity to the text.
Prerequisite: Two 300-level Japanese courses
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 408-078
May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
JAPN 455-072: Selected Authors, Works, Themes: Intermediate Japanese II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JPL Intermediate Japanese 305 (6 credits)
Works of one or more outstanding authors or on a special theme. This course is designed for those who want to improve their overall Japanese language skills, with special emphasis on reading and writing. In this course the second half of “An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese” will be used as the core text, supplemented with authentic Japanese materials from several academic disciplines. Authentic materials may include newspaper articles on relevant social or political issues, short essays, and short articles from academic texts. Students will continue to be exposed to, learn and use expressions, vocabulary and the styles of writing found in academic texts and newspapers.
Prerequisite: Two 300-level Japanese courses
Restrictions: must be taken at Akita in conjunction with JAPN 355-071, Upper Intermediate Japanese
LLCU 360: Humanities Colloquium: Japanese Visual Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 370 Anime and Contemporary Japanese Visual Culture
You've all seen anime—but do you know the real story of anime's rise as a global pop culture phenomenon? All the fascinating interconnections between anime and other visual media in Japan and globally? The myriad ways we can interact with anime, manga, contemporary TV, cinema, and more? What aspects make these culture industry products Japanese, and what aspects make them transnational? If you are ready to expand your cultural horizons through screenings and in-depth discussions of the most riveting anime, films, and TV programs coming out of contemporary Japan, then this course is for you.
LLCU 380-070: Japanese Culture in Translation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 365 Representing Japan: Image, Sound, and People
Special topics in Japanese culture. This course will explore how Japan has been culturally represented within and outside the country for different purposes and audiences since the mid-nineteenth century. Students will comparatively examine various cultural artifacts and social events that provide a unique form of cross-cultural encounter - such as photography, world expositions, traditional and popular music, dance, sport events, tourism, political campaign and advertisements, etc
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 409-073: Topics in World Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PLS 360 - Chinese Politics and Thought
This course is to study the thoughts of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping;two great leaders in contemporary China. Mao and Deng could well represent two different Chinese political thoughts in 20th century. This course will equip students with useful information and conceptual tools for further research on China in the fields of politics, society, economics and business.
POSC 409-074: Topics in World Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 220 Japanese Politics
This course gives a wide and deep understanding of political issues currently ocurring in Japan. It stands on the following basic philosophy: “There is no national vitality without local vitality.” And, in addition to taking up most current political issues, the discussions are conducted in direction of decentralization with the emphasis on the underlying structural issues. Therefore, “change” here means to abandon the uniformity developed under the centralized system, with the central government telling the local governments what to do, and instead to re-embrace the uniqueness and diversity rooted in the decentralized system, allowing each locale to pursue a way of life based on their own values and traditions.
POSC 428-073: Topics in Asian Politics: Foreign Policy of Japan (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAS 240: Foreign Poilcy of Japan
In this course students will learn to critically understand Japanese foreign relations from diverse perspectives. By applying a well-known conceptual framework for foreign policy framework (the three levels of analysis), we will explore how Japanese foreign relations is not driven by grand theories, concepts or paradigms, but is more of a hybrid of reacting to the changes in the international system as well as implementing domestic politics at a specific time. The course first will follow the historical development of Japanese foreign relations under the Meiji Constitution and then focus on the postwar era.
POSC 428-070: Topics in Asian Politics: Japanese Constitution and Law (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LAW 160 Japanese Constitute and Law
The Constitution sets out the fundamental principles of Japanese government and the rights of its people. It is essential knowledge that requires consideration of the nature of government and the character of a nation. This course aims to provide students with sufficient knowledge and capacity for thinking about these fundamental questions of government and society.
UNIV 373-010: Study Abroad - Akita (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
The semester in Japan is designed for sophomores, juniors, and seniors regardless of major, who have completed Japanese 106, or the equivalent, prior to departure. Applicants must have earned grades of at least a B in all Japanese language courses. Exceptions may be made upon petition to the chairperson of the Japanese faculty, Dr. Rachael Hutchinson (rhutch@udel.edu). A basic knowledge of Japanese is essential, and a minimum 2.8 grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) is required at the time of application. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please send a copy of your official transcript to: IGS, Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716 USA.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Fall Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,400.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and IGS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in early April.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early August.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Estimated Tuition based on current year$5,935.00$15,930.00
Estimated Program Fee$550.00$550.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (estimated)$6,485.00$16,480.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,400.00$1,400.00
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onFebruary 20, 2018
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedMarch 22, 2018
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *early April
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly August
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Please note that this program is highly competitive and will accept only a limited number of applicants.
Contacts
Lisa Chieffo
Associate Director
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-2852
302-831-6042
lchieffo@udel.edu
Mark Miller
Faculty Director
Foreign Languages and Literatures
327 Jastak-Burgess
302-831-0653
markm@udel.edu
File Downloads
Akita-UD course equivalencies
Akita Tip Sheet
interest meeting ppt
advice and tips from Taylor Link

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.




  • University of Delaware   •   Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716   •   USA   •   Phone: (302) 831-2852   •   © 2017