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Program Information
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Spring 2018: Rome, Italy
January 09, 2018 - May 05, 2018 (dates are tentative)
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Meetings
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
10/12/2017 3:00 PM - 4:30 PMClayton Hall 213
10/27/2017 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM203 McDowell
11/10/2017 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM203 McDowell
Program Notes
Program Description

Study in Rome, “La Città Eterna”, home to over 2,500 years of history and more than three million Italians. This UD semester program is co-hosted by John Cabot University (JCU), an accredited, degree-granting liberal arts institution enrolling over 1000 students from across the world. JCU’s location in the Trastevere section of Rome, on the Tiber River, close to central Rome and Vatican City, make it ideally situated for students wishing to live and learn amidst a unique blend of the ancient and the contemporary.

John Cabot University maintains two campuses in Rome, each with its own character. Enter the Guarini Campus through its famous Porta Settimiana, part of the Aurelian Wall, dating from the third century. Guarini is located on the former grounds of the Accademia dei Lincei (National Science Academy), where Galileo was once a member. Here you'll find classrooms; the Aula Magna Regina auditorium (concerts, plays, films & lectures); the Frohring Library, including multimedia lab and media room; administrative offices; and two classic Italian terraces, where students gather to socialize. A five-minute walk from Guarini is the Tiber Campus, a state-of-the-art building with smart classrooms, a student lounge, the dining hall, the Student Activities office, and other student services. Both John Cabot University campuses are fully wireless and equipped with 21st-century learning technologies. JCU’s status as a fully accredited secondary educational institution means that it offers an array of services similar to those found on U.S. campuses: student clubs, sport and recreational activities, fitness center, computer labs, libraries, cultural and social events, counseling and medical services, and a residence life staff.

This semester in Rome program is designed for undergraduate students regardless of major. Courses are taught by JCU’s approximately 100 international faculty, many of whom were educated in the United States. Instructional methods and grading are based on the U.S. system. Instruction is in English, with the exception of Italian language courses. Some courses include out-of-class activities throughout Rome, which may require an additional fee.

This semester-long study abroad program offers opportunities for more immersive experiences such as internships (ITAL367) or community engagement. Contact the program coordinator for more details about either opportunity, or see JCU community service or JCU internships. Please note: internship placement is not guaranteed.

Students will be housed in double or triple rooms in furnished JCU or JCU-leased apartments with other JCU students. Most apartments are within a 20-minute walk or ride to JCU, and all include a washing machine, a full kitchen with appliances and utensils, linens, and a cleaning service. Some apartments are situated amidst apartments occupied by local residents, providing a perfect opportunity for meaningful contact with locals.

The Program Fee includes housing and fees, airport transfer in Rome, orientation week activities, all program-related activities, full access to JCU facilities and services, and international medical insurance.

The Program Fee does not include airfare, UD tuition, meals, books, return trip to airport, or the required "Permit to Stay" fee levied by the Italian government (currently $250 for U.S. citizens). The program officially begins when students arrive in Rome. Students will need to budget for meals, cell phone, books and supplies, and other personal expenses. Upon acceptance to the program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together. See the Cost section below for estimated airfare.

Due to the time required to obtain a visa, at the time of application to this program, students must have a valid passport which will remain valid for at least six months post program (November 2018).

Hear it from another student: Do you have questions about daily life on this program (free time, travel, housing, classes, etc.)? Ask one of our Ambassador Associates, a student currently studying on this program. Send an email to Matt Drexler (mdrexler@udel.edu), with the words "Ambassador Associate" in the subject line. Your email will be forwarded to a student at the overseas site, and that student will respond directly to you.
ACCESSIBILITY: Participants with disabilities should know that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. But UD students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
All course are taught in English with the exception of Italian (ITAL) courses.

Please note: Courses offered are subject to change as the host institution’s scheduling may change.
ART 129-070: Design in Visual Arts (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 101 Introduction to Graphic Design
Introduction to art and design principles within creative problem solving assignments using 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional media. Design organization criteria, technical craftsmanship, and artistic objectives interconnect to support production of original expressive statements.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to nonmajors and nonminors only.
ART 180-070: Photographic Approaches (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 199 Basic Photography
Introduces the basics of photography as a way to communicate ideas emphasizing content, composition, and technique. Examines contemporary artists and historic movements through research, gallery visits and lectures. Using a digital camera and visual editing software students create, edit and critique images.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors and non-minors only.
ART 230-070: Figure Drawing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 212 Figure Drawing
Drawing the human figure with emphasis on structure, proportion, and volume. Various dry media explored.
Prerequisite: ART112
ART 231-070: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 204 Beginning Painting
An exploration of beginning oil painting methods and material through both traditional and conceptual painting ideas, providing the student with a foundation for discovering their unique potential for self-expression.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 233-070: Drawing as Study (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 110 Drawing - Rome Sketchbook
This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 384-070: Photographic Strategies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 289 Digital Photography
Expand critical and technical skills to manifest your creative vision through the lens. Develop individual work with contemporary photographic tools from cell phones to scanners and 35 mm to DSLR. Advance techniques with image processing and printing in the darkroom and/or with digital imaging software.
Prerequisite: ART207 or ART280 or ART281 or ART289.
ARTH 199-070: Topics in Art History: Rome, Ostia, and Pompeii I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 190 Cities, Towns and Villas; Rome, Ostia, Pompeii
Rome, Ostia and Pompeii are three of the best preserved archaeological sites in the world. Through their study, we are able to comprehend the physical and social nature of Roman cities and how they transformed over the course of centuries. We explore the subjects of urban development, public and private buildings, economic and social history, and art incorporated into urban features (houses, triumphal monuments, etc.). In Rome, we focus primarily upon public buildings commissioned by Senators and Emperors: temples, law courts, theaters, triumphal monuments, baths. In Ostia, the port-city of Rome, we are able to experience many aspects of daily life: commerce, housing, religion, entertainment. Pompeii represents a well-to-do Republican and early Imperial period city which was influenced by the Greeks and Romans and preserves some of the most magnificent frescoes in the world. The course is conducted entirely on site, including a one-day excursion to Pompeii (equivalent to two class meetings).
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 239-075: Art and Architecture of Europe, Topic: Ancient Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 290 Ancient Rome and Its Monuments
Survey course focusing on the city of Rome from its origins in the 8th century B.C. to the reign of Constantine (312-337 AD). The class is taught entirely on site at archaeological sites and in museums in a first-hand encounter with the monuments of the city. The topography of the city and its surviving monuments and artworks are used as the primary sources for an examination of the historical and political development of the city, and of the aesthetic, social and cultural meaning of its visual culture. This course requires an activities fee of €40.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-076: Art and Architecture of Europe, Topic: Baroque Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 298 Baroque Rome & Its Monuments
Painting, sculpture and architecture from the time of Caravaggio and the Carracci to Bernini and Cortona. Examines topics such as the Counter-Reformation and its impact on the arts, the rise of naturalism and illusionism, the design process and the function of drawings, theatricality and rhetoric. This course requires an activities fee of €25.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-077: Art and Architecture of Europe, Topic: Medieval Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 291 Medieval Rome and Its Monuments
Survey of Roman monuments of art and architecture surviving from the thousand-year ‘Age in the Middle’ between Classical Antiquity and the Early Modernity, i.e. the Renaissance. This course requires an activities fee of €25.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-078: Art and Architecture of Europe, Topic: Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 294 Renaissance Rome & Its Monuments
This course will provide the student with a clear grasp of the Renaissance city and a range of artwork produced in Rome from the end of the Great Schism (1417) to the beginning of the Council of Trent (1545). The majority of contact hours will be on-site and therefore a primary aim of this course is to develop skills of visual analysis and will place an emphasis on architecture. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions within a socio-historic framework. Ultimately, the student will become intimately acquainted with the topography, urban makeup and history of the city and its monuments. This course requires an activities fee of €25.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
BUAD 301-070: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 301 Principles of Marketing
Management of the marketing functions, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, pricing, personal selling, and advertising. Emphasis on consumer and industrial markets.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 306-070: Introduction to Service and Operations Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 330 Operations Management
Analysis of major problems faced by operations managers at different levels of management. Topics include scheduling, forecasting, process design, inventory management and quality management.
Prerequisite: MATH201.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 309-070: Management and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 310 Organizational Behavior
Discusses the processes and procedures used to manage individual performance effectively in organizational settings.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 384-071: Global Business Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 330 International Business
Evaluation of the elements of the national, international, and global environments that influence the context and conduct of international business. Emphasizes aspects of the cultural, political, economic, legal-regulatory, trade, financial, and institutional environments.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 473-070: Consumer Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 310 Consumer Behavior
Explores a variety of topics including: the decision processes associated with buying, consuming, and disposing of products, services, and ideas; social, cultural, and psychological influences on consumer decision making and consumption patterns; the relationship between consumer behavior and marketing decision making.
Prerequisite: BUAD301
BUAD 475-071: International Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 330 International Marketing
Analysis of the concepts and practices relating to the marketing of products and services internationally. Focus on the uncontrollable environmental forces facing an international marketer, issues relating to the standardization of marketing strategies across countries and the unique problems of specific international markets.
Prerequisite: BUAD 100 or BUAD 301
COMM 212-070: Oral Communication in Business (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 101 Public Speaking: Oral Rhetoric and Persuasion
Includes an analysis of the types and principles of the communication inherent in the business and professional setting; a concentration upon the development of presentational skills: analyzing audiences, questioning, interviewing, researching, supporting, organizing and delivering information; an opportunity to develop and present materials within dyads, small groups and public contexts.
Restrictions: Not open to communication and communication interest majors.
Credit not given for both COMM212 AND COMM350.
COMM 245-070: Media and Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 220 Media, Culture, and Society
The relationship between media and culture; how media affect culture (i.e., socialization and role modeling); and exploration of new forms of mass communication.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 101-070: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 201 Principles of Microeconomics
Introduces supply and demand concepts with basic economic graphs. Examines models of perfect and imperfect competition and determinants of production price and quantity. Covers microeconomic issues such as the effect of government regulation and environmental problems.
Prerequisite: MATH114, MATH115, MATH221, MATH241 or higher.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 103-070: Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 202 Principles of Macroeconomics
Analyzes the determinants of unemployment, inflation, national income and policy issues relating to how the government alters unemployment and inflation through government spending, taxes and the money supply.
Prerequisite: ECON101
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 340-070: International Economics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 316 International Economics
Theory, problems and policy in international trade and finance with emphasis on developments since World War II.
Prerequisite: ECON 101 and ECON 103
Restrictions: ECON340 cannot be taken for credit after ECON441 and/or ECON443.
ENGL 217-070: Introduction to Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 210 Introduction to Cinema
Focuses on different techniques of acting, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound and color to assess how films encourage audiences to respond in the ways they do.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 365-070: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements: Perceptions of Italy in Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 282 Italian Visions: Perceptions of Italy in Literature
This course attempts to chart the incredible influence of Italy on the imaginations of British, American and European writers of the 18th and 19th centuries. By the end of the course, we will be able to appreciate how much these writers are influenced not just by Italy, but by each other’s responses to its rich resources, despite their very different cultural or historical perspectives. Students should develop an appreciation and awareness of importance of the transcultural and transnational relationships between these writers. In addition to reading, students will make on-site visits to places relevant to the literature studied.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
FINC 311-070: Principles of Finance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FIN 301 Intro to Finance
Introduces fundamental techniques and concepts related to the financial management of business firms. Topics include the time value of money, valuation, capital budgeting, working capital management, cost of capital, capital structure analysis, short and long term financing.
Prerequisite: ACCT207.
Restrictions: Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only. Open to students whose major requires this course.
FINC 415-071: International Finance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FIN 330 International Finance
Examines the international monetary environment and its impact on financial planning for the firm. Topics include exchange rates, currency restrictions, tax regulations, direct investment theory, capital budgeting, financing, risk management, and working capital management.
Prerequisite: ECON 302
Restrictions: Open to Junior and Senior Finance Majors only. Open to students whose major or minor requires this course.
HIST 339-071: Topics in Modern European History: Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HS 366 Italy from Mussolini to the Crisis of the First Republic
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites. Topics vary but usually focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Taught abroad only. May be repeated for credit when taken on different study abroad programs.
HIST 341-070: Ancient Rome (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL/HS 231 History of Ancient Rome and Italy
Students are encouraged to form opinions on such questions as why and how Rome came to rule its empire; why Julius Caesar was murdered; and why Augustus succeeded where Julius Caesar had failed. Readings in ancient sources. Extensive use of slides.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ITAL 105-070: Italian I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 101 Introductory Italian
Introduction to the Italian language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
ITAL 106-070: Italian II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 102 Introductory Italian II
Completion of basic Italian. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: ITAL105 Two to three years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
ITAL 107-070: Italian III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 201 Intermediate Italian I
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, reading texts of average difficulty.
Prerequisite: ITAL106 Four years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
ITAL 200-070: Italian Grammar Review (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 202 Intermediate Italian II
Systematic review of fundamental aspects of Italian grammar. Study of special problem areas. Some conversational practice.
Prerequisite: ITAL 107
ITAL 206-070: Culture Through Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 301 Conversation & Composition
Discussion of topics drawn from contemporary Italian life. Designed for students who wish to broaden their knowledge of Italian culture while improving their oral and aural language skills.
Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Restrictions: Taught abroad only.
ITAL 212-070: Italian Reading and Composition: Drama and Prose (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 302 Advanced Composition
Reading and discussion of some major 20th-century plays and prose texts. Several short compositions. Grammar review where appropriate.
Prerequisite: ITAL 200, 205, or 206
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ITAL 355-070: Special Topics: Introduction to Italian Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 310 Intro to the Study of Italian Literature
Provides students with a broad understanding of Italian literature. The course introduces the fundamental principles and techniques of literary analysis and applies them to the three genres of fiction, drama and poetry, while presenting a sample of works and authors from across the whole Italian literary tradition.
Prerequisite: ITAL310 or ITAL311.
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
ITAL 355-071: Special Topics: Italian Women Writers (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 335 Twentieth Century Italian Women Writers
The course provides an investigation on how the representation of female characters is expressed in literary works written by women. Through the particular perspectives of Italian women writers, the course explores versions of “feminine writing” and introduces gender- and genre-related issues. Class discussion and assignments will examine themes such as the construction of female identity, and the role women’s writings played in the context of social and political emancipation for women in Italy.
Prerequisite: ITAL310 or ITAL311.
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
ITAL 366: Independent Study (3 credits)
Available for 1 to 3 credits. Student should verify offering with Dept. Student will work with Dept. faculty member to create specifics of the study.
Restrictions: Must verify with offering Dept.
ITAL 367: Internship (3 credits)
120-150 hours of non-paid, graded, credit-bearing employment experience at an Italian company, non-profit, or other organization, with academic expectations such as a journal and final report. Guided oversight by JCU faculty. Requires an application and employer interview; placement not guaranteed. Those who would like to complete an internship for credit must have at least junior standing and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

To be eligible to apply for a non-credit internship through JCU Career Services, students should have at least sophomore standing and a minimum GPA of 2.7.

JCU Internships








Prerequisite: For credit-bearing: any two 200-level ITAL courses and GPA of at least 3.0
ITAL 455-070: Selected Authors, Works, Themes: Survey of Italian Literature II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 321 Survey of Italian Literature II
Analyzes the major writers of Italy from the 18th century to the present.Students are exposed to the evolution of Italian literature from a historical perspective, with emphasis on the major literary, philosophical, and cross-cultural influences that shaped Italy's modern literary production.
Prerequisite: Any two 300-level Italian literature courses
Restrictions: Can be repeated for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 330-071: Varying Authors, Themes, Movements: Italian Cinema (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITS/CMS 241 Italian Cinema
Study of modern Italian cultural history through cinema.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 330-070: Varying Authors, Themes, Movements: Studies in Medieval Catholic Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 278 Literature and Society in Ancient Rome OR RN 225 Mystics, Saints, Sinners: Studies in Medieval Catholic Culture
The course will begin by studying the theological foundations of self and world in the work of Augustine and Pseudo-Dionysius, before turning to an elucidation of central religious institutions such as the papacy and its relationship to imperial Rome, the monastery (we will study the rule of Saint Benedict and will visit a Benedictine monastery), the cathedral (we will visit San Giovanni in Laterano and Saint Peter’s), and the university (and the scholastic philosophy to which it gave rise). We will then turn to alternative expressions of medieval religious faith in the work of several mystics. Finally we will study the reactions of the Church to the rise of science in the fifteenth century (we will look at the trial of Giordano Bruno) and will end with an appraisal of the continuity and renewal of Renaissance Humanism.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
PHIL 244-070: Philosophy of Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 304 Philosophy of Art and Beauty
An introduction to main philosophic problems concerning art: the nature, evaluation and value of art.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 240-070: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 209 World Politics
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 270-070: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 223 Comparative Politics
Introduction to key concepts and patterns in comparative politics. Topics include democratic processes and democratization, economic and political development, political institutions, and civil society. Cases from different parts of the world are examined to provide a grounding in comparative analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 309-070: Political Culture by Country: Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 215 Italian Politics and Society
Overview of the origins of the Italian republic, including reading through its constitution. Description of how its political system reflected the Cold War confrontation; examination of why and how it experienced dramatic changes at the beginning of the 1990's; observation and analysis of today’s main political competitors; discussion of the impact that soccer has had on Italian society
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Offered only in conjunction with travel abroad programs. May be taken twice for credit when countries vary.
POSC 442-070: Topics in European Politics: Western Europe since 1945 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 250 Western European Politics
Examination of current trends in European politics. Topics will vary.
Restrictions: May be taken twice for credit when topics vary.
SOCI 204-070: Urban Communities (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/ITS 226 Rome: Modern City
Urbanization, rural-urban social differences and the organization of urban communities by race, class, ethnicity and stage in the life cycle. On-site classes will be held in a variety of Roman neighborhoods in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. They will include teacher-guided group discussions and observational activities to refine students’ skills of sociological analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 367-070: Sociology of Southern Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/ITS 225 Sociology of Southern Italy
Examination of the social history and contemporary realities of Southern Italy, focusing on the many paradoxes which continue to characterize the area, such as the influence of history and tradition alongside the often rapid social changes which have occurred since World War II. Some of the themes to be studied are: the Unification of Italy from a Southern perspective; the mass migrations of the twentieth century; the development of organized crime and the anti-Mafia movements; clientelist politics and civil society; the changing role of women.
UNIV 373-018: Study Abroad - Rome, Italy (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
The Semester in Rome is designed for undergraduate students regardless of major. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is required. A minimum 2.670 grade point average is preferred.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please send a copy of your official transcript to: IGS, Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716 USA.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Spring Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,300.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and IGS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in mid-October.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early January.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Final Tuition based on current year$5,935.00$15,930.00
Final Program Fee$10,300.00$10,300.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (final)$16,235.00$26,230.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,300.00$1,300.00
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onSeptember 20, 2017
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedSeptember 27, 2017
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *mid-October
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly January
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Maryann Rapposelli
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-6448
302-831-6042
mrap@udel.edu
File Downloads
Interest Meeting Slides
Approved Course List
JCU academic calendar

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.




  • University of Delaware   •   Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716   •   USA   •   Phone: (302) 831-2852   •   © 2017