Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[93]
Fall 2019: Prague, Czech Republic
August 28, 2019 - December 17, 2019
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Photo contributed by L. Henker.
Meetings
Interest Meetings:
11/28/2018 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
11/29/2018 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
02/22/2019 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
02/28/2019 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
04/19/2019 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM213 Clayton Hall
05/10/2019 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM213 Clayton Hall
Program Notes
If you are unable to attend an interest meeting, or if meetings have passed, please refer to the interest meeting power point found at the bottom of this page.
Program Description
Participants on the Prague program will experience the history and beauty of this dynamic capital city. Czech citizens will remind you that their country is part of Central (not Eastern) Europe, and one look at a map proves them correct. Prague is a city of stunning architectural, social and political contrasts. From 15th century government buildings to 1970's apartments to super-modern 21st century office complexes, Prague has much to interest the eye. Look a bit deeper to discover a culture and people who have adapted and thrived through centuries of political change. Take the time to ask people to share their stories, and you'll be amazed by what you'll learn.

The University of Delaware collaborates with CEA, which is the organization that coordinates all of the on-site program logistics. Based at Anglo-American University (AAU), the oldest private university in the Czech Republic, their campus is located in Thurn-Taxis Palace within Prague's baroque historical Mala Strana quarter. The newly renovated historical palace combines the beauty of typical Prague architecture with state-of-the art facilities and technology. All AAU buildings have WiFi, and students have access to a computer lab, student lounge, cafeteria, counseling center, career office and library. The university is surrounded by the city’s main historical attractions and is just a few minutes walk from Old Town Square over the famous medieval Charles Bridge.

Courses are taught in English by international faculty. Participants take classes with other international students as well as American students from other U.S. universities. AAU currently enrolls approximately 700 students. Note that the courses listed on this page may be offered, but are not guaranteed, and enrollment in specific courses can be competitive. Although students may be able to take courses in their major, flexibility is necessary, and they should select at least 8-10 potential courses in case first-choice options are not available.

Excursions differ each term, but semester students are typically offered three opportunities to explore outside of the city, plus multiple group outings within Prague. Past excursions have included an overnight trip to the UNESCO Heritage Site of Ceský Krumlov, a daytrip to Kutná Hora (a medieval town famous for its “bone church”), and a daytrip to Karlovy Vary, the Czech Republic’s largest, most famous spa city. All excursions are included in the program fee.

Internships are available for an added cost of approximately $300. Additional materials are required for internship participants (cover letter and resume--see samples downloadable at the bottom of this page). Students who opt for an internship enroll in one of four courses as their core course. See the course information below for details. Internships are only open to students Although specific placements are not guaranteed, students have interned in the fields of marketing, management, journalism, communication, international relations, and more. Please refer to the internship guide at the bottom of this page for more information.

Important: CEA requires that students have already completed 1 full year as a registered college/university student at the time of their application to the internship program. Additionally, 3-4 courses directly related to the internship field of interest or 6 weeks full time work in the field is encouraged when applying for internships.

Community outreach opportunities are also available, but vary widely by term. Prague staff will be available to help students find opportunities that match their interests once they arrive onsite. Past opportunities have included providing support to local schools in the areas of teaching, writing, and the English language and participating in the local media by acting as a correspondent or photographer.

Accommodations: Students reside in double/triple rooms in apartments, with full kitchens and internet access. Apartments have washing machines (but not dryers) and central heating (but not air conditioning).

Visa: Accepted students are responsible for applying for and obtaining a visa for the Czech Republic. Currently there is no application fee for the visa, but this may change at any time. Students will receive detailed instructions after acceptance but are ultimately responsible for obtaining their own visa.

The Program Fee includes airport pick-up upon arrival in Prague, housing, group excursions, social and volunteer opportunities, and international medical insurance. Participants should budget an extra $50 for visa photos and mailing expenses, $130 for books and supplies, $700-1300 for meals, $125 for a local transportation pass, and an additional $800-1200 for personal expenses (laundry, phone, etc.).

The Program Fee does not include airfare or airport transfers within the U.S. The program officially begins when students arrive in Prague. See the Cost section below for estimate airfare. For this program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together. You are responsible for arriving in Prague at the time indicated by the site director, in order to meet the program staff and take advantage of group transportation. Detailed instructions will be provided at your first orientation meeting.

For more information about the Prague semester program:
  • Attend an Interest Meeting
  • Read entries about Prague on our IGS blog
  • Scroll to the bottom of this page and take a look at the Interest Meeting PowerPoint presentation
  • Also at the bottom of this page, you'll find the Course Rubric, Dates and Deadlines calendar, Interview Questionnaire and general Visa Instructions
ACCESSIBILITY: Participants with disabilities should know that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. But UD students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
Important information about courses:
  1. The courses below have been pre-approved for UD students participating on this program.
  2. Although these courses may be offered in Prague during Fall Semester, the final course list is typically not announced until late May. The courses below are not guaranteed, and enrollment in specific courses can be competitive. Students should select at least 8-10 potential courses.
  3. Students take 4-5 courses (5 maximum), of which at least 1 must be a CORE COURSE (see notes in the course descriptions).
  4. Semester classes generally meet 3 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students spend an additional 6 hours per week on assignments and background reading for each course. Some courses include midterm exams, while most courses have final exams at the end of the term.
ACCT 208-070: Accounting II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ACC 263 Managerial Accounting
Introduction to managerial accounting. Topics: manufacturing accounting, cost-volume-profit analysis, job-order accounting, budgeting, standard costs and variance analysis, contribution approach to decision analysis, absorption and variable costing.

In Prague, this course deals with the presentation of information on which cost conscious management decisions will be made. Management accounting teaches how to decide the amount of funding needed for a given project. It also covers areas like budgetary control and standard costing.
Prerequisite: ACCT207
Restrictions: Not open to freshmen. Requires a grade of C- or better in ACCT207.
ACCT 352-070: Law and Social Issues in Business (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LBS 210 Introduction to Business Law
Focuses on the legal environment of business, including objectives of the law, sources of the law, regulatory and judicial process, and effect of government and society on the formation and evolution of the law.

In Prague, this course gives a general overview of law and legal systems. It covers the nature and sources of law, court systems, and the substantive areas of constitutional law, contracts, torts, criminal law, contracts, agency, and property from and within the EU as well as USA perspective. The course is geared towards providing students with a basic knowledge of all aspects of the law, critical legal thinking, and a comparative approach to the civil and common law systems. Emphasis is placed on a good overview and understanding of most practical legal issues related to business conduct, i.e. on the legal framework and its application to domestic, national, and international commerce.
Restrictions: Not open to accounting majors. Requires sophomore status.
ART 167-070: Seminar: Cross-Media Art Studio (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 302 Cross-Media Art Studio
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

In Prague, this course will introduce students to Studio Art with an emphasis on photography, but touching upon other important media from drawing, painting, sculpting, performance and self-performance to new media and video. Students will learn to use all possible media to find the right tools to express their ideas, concepts and feelings about themselves, contemporary society and nature.

This course is an inter-disciplinary exploration of photograph, video, performance, and all of the evolving forms of new media. Regardless of artistic ability, students will engage with studio art practices and art production in group and solo projects. Students will also critically respond to contemporary art through visiting cross-media art exhibits (visual, audio, haptic, interactive and new media), performances, installations and festivals.
Prerequisite: History of Art, Painting class, Cultural studies - recommended
ART 180-070: Digital Photography for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 252 Digital Photography
Additional Fee: $45.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 1000 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Required Supplies: Students should have, or have access to, a digital camera that allows for manual adjustment of exposure, shutter speed, aperture and focus.

Overview: The aim of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive overview of photography as a digital medium. Coursework will provide a platform for students to explore technique and process as well as their own creative pursuits. Particular emphasis will be placed on concept development, digital capture, editorial technique, and digital presentation. Post-production software programs will be introduced, but not highlighted in this class.

In addition to practical application, students will be introduced to a variety of contemporary visual artists through gallery visits and discussions. Upon completion of the course, students will have an improved understanding of digital photography in both form and function, laying the foundation for further exploration of the digital process.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 230-070: Figure Drawing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 385 Art Studio-Painting: The Figure in Central European Expressionism
Additional Fee: $90.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 2000 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Drawing the human figure through direct observation. Emphasizes strong fundamental skills, experimentation and imagination. Working with an assortment of traditional mixed media, students explore line,value,color and perspective to interpret form and space while developing original content.

In Prague, this painting course will center the use of the human figure as a primary subject of expression in Central European painting and technical studio instruction for this expression. After an introductory lecture, the class will move to the studio facilities to work directly from live models. Here students will be taught the basics of drawing from the figure while simultaneously applying the experiences and knowledge gained from the lectures and the museums in Prague. Students will work primarily from the model, but should be inspired stylistically by the specific Expressionist characteristics of Central European art. The premise is that the Central Europe of Prague and Vienna developed according to its unique history and artistic heritage, which differed from the cultures of other European capitals and regions and that this can be a valuable source of inspiration for the contemporary artist.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 231: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 381 Painting Studio I
Additional Fee: $90.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 2000 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

An exploration of beginning oil painting methods and material through both traditional and conceptual painting ideas, providing the student with a foundation for discovering their unique potential for self-expression.

In Prague, this is a painting course to be held in the studios of the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague. Students will paint from the model, still life, landscape and their own imagination, but inspired by the specific Expressionist and Surrealist characteristics of Central European art. The premise is that Central Europe of Prague and Vienna developed according to its unique history and artistic heritage, which differed from the cultures of other European capitals and regions and that this can be a valuable source of inspiration for the contemporary artist.

Students will be painting in some of the finest studios in Europe and work in one of the most visually inspirational cities in the world.

There are no prerequisites as we can accommodate beginners and more advance students in this multilevel course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 267-071: Seminar: Creative Photography (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 253 Creative Photography
The aim of this course is to provide students with the information needed to use photography as a creative medium. Coursework will provide a platform for students to explore how to apply their creative potential to different photographic themes. Particular emphasis will be placed on hands-on photography and discussing the results in class.
ART 289-070: Documentary Photography (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 251 Documentary Photography
Additional Fee: $45.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 1000 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Required Supplies: Students should have, or have access to, a digital camera that allows for manual adjustment of exposure, shutter speed, aperture and focus.

Introduces critical issues and practices in documentary photography and video. Explores the influence of social documentarians. Examines the relationship of word and image, the role of photo editors and the development of the photo-essay through discussion and studio experience.

In Prauge, this course, subtitled "Between Document and Art' aims to introduce students to documentary photography. Students will become familiar with international documentary photography, both historical and contemporary. During the course students will learn the basic theory and principles of documentary photography. The course places special emphasis on personal documentary projects, with the goal of practical application of theoretical knowledge. Students will gain hands-on experience by creating a documentary photography series themselves. Those who complete the course will have significantly improved their understanding of photography as both a means of documenting events, and as a form of fine art. In addition, by the end of the course students will have improved their practical skills to the point of being able to pursue more advanced work in documentary photography covering a wider range of subjects
ARTH 167-070: History of Art I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 101 History of Art I
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

In Prague, this course is a survey of art and architecture in the Western tradition from prehistoric times until the Middle Ages (ca. 40,000 B.C.E. - 1300 C.E.). The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the main developments in visual culture during this period, as well as to introduce students to the basic methodology of art-historical studies.
ARTH 199-075: Topics in Art History: Modernism - From Realism to Modern Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 275 Modernism - From Realism to Modern Art
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

An introduction to great artists and their masterpieces. Topics change with each time of offering. Specific topics may focus on a crucial moment in history, or on a particular theme explored throughout the ages.

In Prague, this course traces the beginning of Modernism to Realism of the second half of the 19th century and presents the history of Modern art to the post World War II point when New York replaced Paris as the world?s art center - the point when the modernist agenda of re-thinking all traditional values and radically redefining and extending their meanings was fulfilled literally and thus had reached its own limit. We will study and discuss painting, sculpture, and architecture and gain understanding of major twentieth-century stylistic movements, situating them within the historical, philosophical, social, and political contexts in which they arose. The classroom lectures will be combined with excursions to museums, art galleries, and historical sites relevant to the topics covered in the class.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit twice when topics vary.
ARTH 239-076: Art and Architecture of Europe: Prague Art & Architecture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 131 Prague Art & Architecture
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Primary focus on painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe from the Romanesque to the Modern eras. Subject matter determined by country in which overseas program is conducted.

In Prague, the focus of this course will be to survey the main characteristics of important artistic and architectural styles found in Prague, with the view to explore the interrelationship of their development with the key historical events and movements of the various eras. The chosen examples will therefore be considered not only from the perspective of style, but also from the point of view of their meaning and function within the prevailing political, religious, and socio-economic context. The aim is to have students develop an understanding of art and architecture as products not only of individual artists, but also of the larger cultural and historical influences of their age.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: CORE COURSE
BUAD 301-070: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 248 Introduction to Marketing
Management of the marketing functions, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, pricing, personal selling, and advertising. Emphasis on consumer and industrial markets.

In Prague, this is an examination of the overall marketing system from the marketing decision-maker's viewpoint. The course emphasizes product, price, promotion, and distribution as well as planning, research, and organization required to implement marketing concepts. Also, we study the managerial, economic, social, and legal implications of marketing activities, policies, and strategies.

Because of the recent dramatic changes in the way marketing is conducted through the internet and social media, a significant portion of the course will be spent on the use of web 2.0 and sites such as Facebook, youtube, twitter and others. We will attempt to balance the old and the new through case studies and real life marketing applications.
Prerequisite: Business Mathematics
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 306-070: Introduction to Service and Operations Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 415 Operations Management
Analysis of major problems faced by operations managers at different levels of management. Topics include scheduling, forecasting, process design, inventory management and quality management.

In Prague, the course examines decision making in operations management, focusing on those who are responsible for producing the goods and services sold by a manufacturing or service organization. This course will be taught with as many practical examples as possible. Topics include process analysis and design, quality and productivity management, Justin- Time (JIT) analysis, and the role of these topics in formulating and executing competitive strategy.
Prerequisite: MATH 201 or STAT 200
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 364-073: Business Administration in Practice (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 349 International Internship
Requires completion of at least 120 hours of a management, marketing, operations management, or international business internship with verification by the hiring company. Term paper relating the real-world duties and experiences of the internship to principles learned in traditional business courses also required.

In Prague, the aim of International Internship: The Multicultural Workplace is to equip you with everything you need to get a job and have a successful career. This course is comprised of two parts:

- First, you'll be placed in an internship within a sector related to your professional ambitions as outlined in the placement process.

- Secondly, you will enroll in an academic seminar where you will analyze and evaluate the workplace culture and the daily working environment you experience. The course is divided into key thematic sections grouped around NACE's eight career readiness competencies which guide the course learning objectives.

During the academic seminar, you will be challenged to reflect weekly on your internship experience within the context of your host culture by comparing and contrasting your experiences abroad with that of your home culture. By creating an intentional time to reflect on your experiences in your internship, the role you have played in the evolution of your experience in your internship placement and the experiences of your peers in their internship placements, you will develop a greater awareness of:

1) Your strengths relative to the career readiness competencies and;

2) The subtleties and complexities of integrating into a cross-cultural work environment.

Finally, in addition to personal development, this course gives you a powerful interviewing asset: a story to tell employers. Not a freshman essay of, 'How I spent my semester abroad,' but rather, "This is how working abroad enriched my knowledge, these are the skills I acquired and here's how I hope they can fit in at your company."
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE for Internship Program
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
BUAD 367-070: Seminar: Doing Business in China (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 369 Doing Business in China
In Prague, this course has the objective to provide its participants with a thorough understanding on peculiarities of doing business in China. The main focus of the course will be to equip students with practical skills needed in mastering doing business in the middle kingdom while providing an integrated business perspective on the Chinese historical, philosophical and economical development.
Prerequisite: Marketing and Management courses
BUAD 421-070: Human Resource Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 357 Human Resources Management
Explores traditional topic areas (e.g., planning, selection, training, compensation, performance appraisal, career development, legal regulations) and contemporary issues (e.g., workforce diversity, the link between human resource strategy and firm strategy) related to the effective management of human resources in organizations.

In Prague, the course will provide an overview of human resource management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues in organizational behavior. The course has been developed for the student of general management whose job will involve responsibility for managing people in a global environment.
Prerequisite: BUAD 309
BUAD 424-070: Ethics in the Workplace (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 301 Business Ethics
Examines the behavioral and organizational underpinnings of ethical and unethical workplace behavior, and the various bases (societal, religious, etc.) on which particular management practices can be ethically evaluated. Students are encouraged to develop their skills in articulating and implementing ethical behavior in businesses and other organizations.

In Prague, this course aims to provide students with solid skills to know and deal with the fundamentals of ethics. They are enabled to analyze business, social and environmental issues that are relevant to the development of Corporate Social Responsibility and sustainable business practices. The course focuses on the CSR practices of Multi-National Corporations (MNCs), the challenges and opportunities of acting responsibly in the arena often called "the global village". It also assesses the role of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in acting responsibly in a highly competitive environment. It discusses government strategies to attract Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and the dilemmas these present for responsible business practice and the complex interactions between stakeholders, firms, and government.

The course provides a comprehensive introduction to ethical considerations in business. Students are enabled to develop a deeper understanding of how to act responsibly towards all business stakeholders while, at the same time, not neglecting the firm's profitability. The course will discuss models of how CSR can create a sustainable ROI for companies. Students are encouraged to gain awareness of the interconnectedness of organizations and nations in a globalized world and how their actions as managers will affect different stakeholders, nations and the world as a whole.
Prerequisite: BUAD 309.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 473-070: Consumer Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 329 Buyer Behavior
Explores a variety of topics including: the decision processes associated with buying, consuming, and disposing of products, services, and ideas; social, cultural, and psychological influences on consumer decision making and consumption patterns; the relationship between consumer behavior and marketing decision making.

In Prague, this interdisciplinary course discusses the consumer as the focus of the marketing system. The course stresses the use of knowledge about consumer behaviour in marketing decisions. We will also look at contributions from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics to the understanding of consumer buying behaviour. Individual behavioural variables - needs, motives, perception, attitudes, personality, and learning - and groups, culture, and business are all examined in depth as they affect the consumer decision-making process. Analysis of how marketing programs, especially the communications mix, can be developed to reflect a commitment to providing consumer satisfaction [better: delight] concludes the course.
Prerequisite: BUAD 301
COMM 263-071: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 201 Intercultural Communication
Communicative processes in other cultures as well as subcultures in the US will be discussed. Students will become more mindful and aware of their own cultural patterns as well. Difficulties in cross cultural communication will also be discussed.

In Prague, Intercultural Communication examines the basic tenets of culture, theories of communication and the role of language in it; investigates social channels and factors supporting or preventing intercultural communication; studies cultural diversity of social networks in which speakers use language when they organize into ghettos, villages, immigrant communities, and professional and political groupings, and when they build boundaries and bridges to protect, isolate and converge along gender, age, business interests, social status, class, ethnicity and race; investigates globalization trends and ideologies that accelerate language demise; and tackles linguistic diversity underlying intercultural communication. The students apply their understanding of language rituals, speakers? networks, code-switching, multilingualism and other concepts when collecting data at Olsany cemetery and visiting virtually the multiethnic community of New York City.

What defines culture, communication and language? How and why do speakers build social networks in business, web and daily life? If language becomes an obstacle in intercultural communication, through what channels can communication be accomplished? Are rituals of politeness universal or culture specific? Is language triggered by culture or is it a universal instinct? Will English communicative rituals dominate intercultural communication as English becomes the global language? Or, is English going to split up into new languages?
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
Other: CORE COURSE
COMM 267-070: Seminar: Language & Power (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 380 Language & Power
In Prague, Language and Power is an advanced course on society, ideology and politics that analyzes language use in relation to power. Language is a unique communication system that sustains power, defines humanity and constructs our history. Through language we spread ideologies, create communities, transfer information and manage social discourse. We use language power to control political, economic and social domains, manipulate the public, advertise products to determine consumers' choices, forefront political agenda, gain control over minds and establish power over territories. The power of language is exercised in marginalizing minorities and immigrants, and advancing global languages. Language empowers us by enabling information transfer and shared imagination.
COMM 267-071: Seminar: Visual Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 260 Visual Culture
In Prague, this course is designed to engage the student in the creative process and foster understanding of the visual culture. Topics of study include visual expression and communication in painting, advertising, graphic design, photography, film, computer graphics and typography. Through theory, method and applications, students will develop an understanding of the visual culture and the creative processes inherent in them. Students will analyze, interpret and understand the role the visual phenomena play in their lives and in society. The course is organized around readings, critical evaluation and opinion sharing assignments, written assignments and projects designed to promote visual literacy and understanding of visual images.
COMM 350-070: Public Speaking (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 110 Public Speaking
Analyzes and applies theory and research in public speaking. Develops skills in preparation, presentation and evaluation of speeches. Includes classroom performances.

In Prague, the course is designed to help students communicate information clearly and expressively, developing a personal style that maximizes their expressive skills, with practice using visual aids which enhance the effectiveness of the communication. The course also focuses on interpersonal communication skills, such as listening and a variety of positive roles one can play in a group communication process. The course further intends to help students shape their ideas into effective persuasive presentations. Types of presentations (introducing others, personal experience speech, informative speech, demonstration speech, and persuasive speeches) are analyzed, prepared, presented and critiqued in class with a view toward clear organization of material, optimal delivery skills and effective contact with others. Attention is paid to speaking in multi-cultural environments.
Prerequisite: Composition course
ECON 101-070: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECO 120 Introduction to Microeconomics
Introduces supply and demand concepts with basic economic graphs. Examines models of perfect and imperfect competition and determinants of production price and quantity. Covers microeconomic issues such as the effect of government regulation and environmental problems.

In Prague, a basic introduction to microeconomic theory. This course explores those theories that explain in detail how an economy works. It introduces supply and demand, the firm, price theory, production and cost, with an application of these and other relevant theories to problems in the market economy. In this course, we will study different types of market structure, different kinds of firms, reaction to customers, demand and competitors, strategy and government interventions. Special attention will be devoted to game theory and strategic interactions. All the concepts will be applied to real life examples.
Prerequisite: One of the following: MATH 114, MATH 115, MATH 117, MATH 221, MATH 241, MATH 242, or MATH 243.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 103-070: Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECO 110 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Analyzes the determinants of unemployment, inflation, national income and policy issues relating to how the government alters unemployment and inflation through government spending, taxes and the money supply.

In Prague, as an introduction to macroeconomic theory, this course employs standard macroeconomic approaches and looks at the economy as a whole to gain an understanding of how it works. The course introduces the main macroeconomics concepts and topics: GDP, economic growth, national income, unemployment, inflation, the role of government, fiscal policy, the role of central banks and monetary policy, international monetary arrangements, bubbles and crashes. Students will learn why some countries are rich while others are not, what causes the unemployment or what the effects of inflation are. In addition, the course includes research concerning capitalist economies since the recent world-wide economic crash.
Prerequisite: ECON 101
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 167-070: Seminar: Introduction to Economic Thought (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECO 105 Introduction to Economic Thought
In Prague, an introduction to the rich tapestry of economic thought. A survey of economic ideas over the centuries. In this course students will study many important ancient, medieval and modern ideas contained within the history of economic thought. Students will analyze selected key elements and beliefs contained in many economic concepts, theories and systems as well as learn some of the limits of each. This course surveys the main schools in the history of the development of economic thought, beginning with the Classical school and the works of Smith, Ricardo, J.S. Mill, Thornton, Say, and others. It then reviews challenges to the classical school by Marx, Marginalists, and subsequent key figures like Marshall, Walras and the Neoclassicalists. Economic thought associated with the early 20th century transitionalists are briefly addressed, including economists such as Wicksell, Schumpeter, Fisher, and others. Selective chapters and passages of Keynes' General Theory are covered, focusing in particular on Keynes in areas of investment, interest rate theory and money demand. Post-1945 revisions of Keynes and Neoclassical economics in the form of early and late IS/LM analysis are reviewed though without the mathematics or graphs, and its main challenges by Friedman (Monetarism), Lucas (Rational Expectations), Real Business Cycle theorists, and Post-Keynesian thought (UK and US). The course concludes with a consideration of efficient markets theory and the views of its critics such as Tobin, Hyman Minsky, Shiller, and others. Throughout the course, economic theories will be examined in light of the interrelationships between theory, policies and conditions including responses to the current financial and economic global crises since 2007.
ENGL 306-071: Topics in Writing: Creative Writing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 351 Creative Writing
In Prague, the fundamental aim of this course is to improve your creative writing and critical thinking skills, enable you to generate writing in the future and to impart the creative and critical skills and methodology necessary for a productive career as a creative writer. To accomplish this, students will receive extensive training both in practical and theoretical aspects of writing though lectures, critical readings and workshops.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
ENGL 307-070: News Writing and Editing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JRN 200 Reporting I
News judgment, news gathering, feature writing, libel problems, and ethics. Assignments include writing for the campus newspaper.

In Prague, journalism is in the throes of massive changes, as information delivery systems continue to evolve and influence the speed, format and content of news coverage. Several elements are necessary to thrive and be successful in this environment. One is a mastery of core journalism skills - knowing how to develop, report and write stories that are accurate, balanced and informative. Another is presentation, knowing how to package and disseminate information across a variety of media platforms. The third is an awareness of the dynamic forces shaping journalism in the 21st century, not only in technology, but in critical areas such as freedom of the press, transparency, privacy and ethics. Students will receive instruction in all these areas, and demonstrate the skills they acquire in the online and print editions of the student publication Lennon Wall. Throughout the course, special emphasis will be devoted to grammar, spelling and other fundamentals of communicating clearly and effectively in written English.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Restrictions: Minimum grade of B required in ENGL 110.
ENGL 356-071: Studies in Modern/Contemporary Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LIT 282 Theater & Politics
Study of selected topics in 20th century British, American and world literature, e.g., the contemporary epic novel, post-colonial writing and politics.

In Prague, the course examines the depiction of political issues such as colonialism, totalitarianism, controversies concerning domestic and international policies, and terrorism in twentieth- and twenty-first-century theatre. It also aims to discuss the role that theatre might play as a form of cultural intervention in these issues.

The exploration of theatre and politics is based on an introduction to principal styles and genres of modern theatre that contemporary playwrights may use to address their themes, such as naturalism, epic theatre, and the theatre of the absurd. Influences of these styles will be traced in recent European, American and Latin American plays, and will be followed by a discussion of new theatrical genres, for instance, the monologue play or verbatim drama.

Classes will be complemented by the screening of extracts from productions and other visual material, and by optional attendance at any available theatre productions.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
ENGL 409-070: Topics in Journalism: Travel Writing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JRN 230 Travel Writing
Special studies and writing in selected kinds of journalism (opinion writing, science journalism) or in an aspect of the profession (history of American journalism, ethics of journalism).

In Prague, this course is intended as an introduction to travel writing and aims to teach students how to find story ideas, identify places of interest and write about them in a way that is new and fresh. Most of the course will be spent in classroom, but there may also be a few field trips. Students will be required to submit two long-form writing assignments in lieu of a midterm and final exam, as well as frequent smaller writing assignments. The course will focus on the practical rather than the theoretical. They will also learn how to 'pitch' travel stories to publications, and, ideally, to get their ideas published to generate valuable clips for their portfolios. This course is a hands-on workshop, where students learn the basics of what it entails to make it as a travel writer today. A focus on good reporting and writing basics will underline the course.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
HIST 101-070: Europe and the World I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIS 121 European History I
Europe from the ancient Near East to the Age of Discoveries. Social, cultural, and economic interactions within Europe and with the wider world through religion, conquest, and trade.

In Prague, this course is an interdisciplinary survey of the development of Europe from the Late Roman Empire to the end of the Middle Ages. In this course, we will look at the political, religious, economic, and cultural trends that together formed the medieval world, and consideration will be given to how many of these developments subsequently defined Europe to the present day. Lectures will be based mainly on primary source texts in English translation, as well as examples from art, architecture, music and literature. These primary textual and visual sources along with secondary readings from important medievalists will be the basis for short written exercises and class discussions. There will also be an excursion to the National Gallery collection of Medieval Art later in the semester.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: CORE COURSE
HIST 102-070: Europe and the World II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIS 122 European History II
The transformations of Europe since the middle of the 17th century through cultural, social, and economic developments, revolutions, wars, and interactions with other parts of the world.

In Prague, this course provides an overview of European History from approximately 1500 - 2000. It discusses politics, economics and the sacred in the Early Modern Period, including the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; the Industrial Revolution; the creation of national identities and states; the First World War; the inter-war period; World War II; the post-war Soviet Bloc, and Western Europe in the post-war era. Special attention is given to Central Europe.

The class emphasizes the differing belief systems that have shaped Europe and provided a unifying sense of identity. Some of these included: the supernatural ("religion"); the ideas of the "Enlightenment;" the creation of "national" identity; "race," and "communism." Much of the second half of the semester deals with the crisis years of 1914 - 1945, during which beliefs in "race" and "nationality" reached their culmination.

These belief systems occurred only in specific material contexts, so the course will also discuss the changing political and economic systems of Europe. For example, Early Modern governments were by modern standards tribal and unprofessional arrangements, but modern European states achieved a remarkable and often frightening degree of sophistication and precision. Similarly, economic power in the Early Modern Period was founded on the control of land and its resources, while in the modern age it consisted primarily in capital.

The course emphasizes change rather than continuity in European history. Group identification, borders, and the countryside/cityscape have all been changing constantly, and the Europe of 1500 was not the Europe of today. One of the many aims of this course is to describe these changes more specifically.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: CORE COURSE
HIST 103-070: World History I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIS 103 World History I
Principal political, economic, cultural and social developments in world history through the 16th century, relating the past to the present. Equal weight given to the history of Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe.

In Prague, this course is primarily an overview of Ancient Civilizations from approximately 3500 BC to AD 1500. It includes the civilizations of the Ancient Near East, Ancient and Medieval India, Ancient and Medieval China, the Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, the rise of Christianity and Islam, the Eurasian world in the Middle Ages, and finally, a brief overview of Native American Civilizations from their earliest appearance to the arrival of Columbus in 1492.

This "World History" course is conceived as an opportunity to restore balance to educational systems that have traditionally emphasized the history of "western civilization" and largely ignored the history of other regions. Thus, the emphasis is on "non-western" civilization, although "western" civilization (of course a part of "world history") is not ignored.

This course focuses more on comparison of civilizations than contrast. While differences between human civilizations are striking and important, the amount of similarity, and the ability of all humans to adapt to, learn from, and modify new cultures is also significant. Therefore, the class tries to focus on universal themes, such as the development of writing, the spread of "universal" languages, political ideals of global significance, imperial systems and their management, philosophies and ideologies, and the development of major religious systems and the unifying cultures they helped to create.

The class critically analyses the notion a historical "clash" between mutually antagonistic civilizations. The course looks at ways in which humans have sought to organize and unify themselves. It searches more for similarities and integration than for sensational "exoticism" and remote otherness (although there is much that is intriguing and surprising!). Rather than presuming perpetual antagonism and a simple "oppression" and "victimization" scheme, the course emphasizes cultural negotiation, continual change and adaptation, syncretism, and advantageous borrowing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
HIST 104-071: World History II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIS 104 World History II
Principal political, economic, cultural and social developments in world history from the 16th century to the present, relating the past to the present. Equal weight given to the history of Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe.

In Prague, this course is primarily an overview of World History from approximately 1500 to 2000. The first few weeks focus on the pre-industrial world, including the Age of Exploration, the Islamic Empires, Early Modern China and Japan, and the development of the early American colonies and the Atlantic Slave Trade. A key turning point in the class is the Industrial Revolution (week 5), which drew a sharp line between industrial and pre-industrial regions, which often (but not always) corresponded to "western" and "non-western." The remainder of the course looks at how individuals in pre-industrial societies quickly adapted to the new, often brutal, but sometimes liberating situation. This will include topics such as the two world wars, the international appeal of the "communist" model, and the vexing problems of decolonization.

Modern World History is a vast subject, so instead of discussing every detail, the course emphasizes selected themes of universal significance. One of the aims of this course is to restore balance to educational systems that have traditionally emphasized the history of "western civilization" and largely ignored other regions. However, "the west" is also part of the world, and in the modern era it has been especially influential (through imperialism, for example).

At the time of Christopher Columbus, it is possible to argue that the great world civilizations were roughly "equal" in economic, intellectual, and political sophistication. So where did notions of "western superiority" (often expressed in terms of "race") come from? What made the rapid subjugation of pre-industrial peoples possible in the nineteenth-century? How did people around the world respond to this rapid political, economic, and cultural subjugation?

Although there was plenty of antagonism in modern World History, this course emphasizes cultural negotiation, continual change and adaptation, syncretism, and advantageous borrowing. Rather than presuming a simple "oppression" and "victimization" scheme (although there were a lot of victims!), this course looks at how rapidly and skillfully people around the world learned the technologies, languages, and ideologies of a new age, despite horrific and unfair conditions. "Race" proved no barrier to the creation of a modern, global, industrial culture.

Instead of "exotic" differences (which there sometimes were), this course emphasizes unifying similarities and shared global cultures. It emphasizes, for example, shared beliefs about religion and magic, the global culture of the Industrial Revolution, the nearly universal appeal of nationalism, the various versions of "communism" and its world-wide appeal, and finally, the global appeal of racial ideology.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
HIST 327-070: Topics in Jewish History: Jewish Experience in Central Europe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIS 236 Jewish Experience in Central Europe
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Introductory courses on focused topics in the history of Jewish people from ancient to modern times. Course topics explore the development of religion, culture, politics, and demography of Jews throughout the Diaspora and in modern Israel.

In Prague, this course investigates the history and experiences of Central European Jewry. We will compare the cultural heritage, religious life, political situation, identity formation and self-understanding of Jews in Central Europe starting the in 9th century through today. We will spend considerable time in the following time periods: before, during and after the breakdown of Austria-Hungary, the Second World War and communism. This history course will examine the experiences of Jews throughout Central and Eastern Europe: from Germany in the West to Russia, Hungary and Ukraine in the East and everything in between. In this broad survey, we will pay specific attention to gender and class analysis in our approach to this material. In addition, together, we will explore the complicated history of anti-Semitism as it affected Jewish life in Central Europe as well as the numerous ways Jews flourished in Central Europe in spite of it.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Multicultural
Other: CORE COURSE
HIST 339-076: Topics in European History: Central European History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIS 237 Central European History
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries.

In Prague, this class is conceived as a general introduction to the history of Central Europe. The aim of the course is to achieve an understanding of the history of the different national and cultural entities that now constitute the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland and also Germany and a comprehension of their complex interaction. It will replace the evolution of the various political entities in the context of European history and will give the students the instruments for understanding their position in today's world.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: CORE COURSE
HIST 339-072: Topics in European History: History of the Cold War (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IRS 100 History of the Cold War
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries.

In Prague, the course begins by examining the uneasy alliance that developed in 1941 between the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union against the threat of Nazi Germany and the Axis powers. We will then trace the deterioration of this alliance after 1945 into hostile camps, and the intensification of superpower conflict in Asia during the 1950s.

The death of Stalin in 1953 brought with it some hope for a relaxation of these tensions. But by the end of the 1950s and the early 1960s, the Cold War had entered its most dangerous period, with crises in Europe and the Caribbean (the successive Berlin and Cuban Missile crises) which very nearly resulted in a nuclear conflagration.

A period of so-called détente followed in the later 60s and the 1970s. But a relaxation in tensions between the two superpowers was paradoxically characterized by an intensification of conflict on the periphery of the superpowers' spheres of influence - in South East, the Middle East and Africa. America's unending war in Vietnam, and the war fought between the Arab states and Israel in 1973 - almost brought the world economy to the brink of collapse in the 1970s.

The Cold War would enter another intense phase - the so-called "Second Cold War" - in the late 1970s and early 1980s, almost resulting in the outbreak of nuclear war in 1983. Yet, just at the point where the conflict seemed at its most intense and irreconcilable, it suddenly and unexpectedly ended with the coming to power in the Soviet Union of Mikhail Gorbachev and the rapid collapse of the Soviet empire in Eastern Europe in 1989 and of the Soviet Union itself in 1991.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: CORE COURSE
HOSP 464: International Hospitality Internship (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 349 International Internship
International internship under the supervision of a University of Delaware based professor and an onsite internship coordinator. Experience working in a hospitality related internship with written reflections on the cultural and business practices of the host country.

In Prague, the aim of International Internship: The Multicultural Workplace is to equip you with everything you need to get a job and have a successful career. This course is comprised of two parts:

- First, you'll be placed in an internship within a sector related to your professional ambitions as outlined in the placement process.

- Secondly, you will enroll in an academic seminar where you will analyze and evaluate the workplace culture and the daily working environment you experience. The course is divided into key thematic sections grouped around NACE's eight career readiness competencies which guide the course learning objectives.

During the academic seminar, you will be challenged to reflect weekly on your internship experience within the context of your host culture by comparing and contrasting your experiences abroad with that of your home culture. By creating an intentional time to reflect on your experiences in your internship, the role you have played in the evolution of your experience in your internship placement and the experiences of your peers in their internship placements, you will develop a greater awareness of:

1) Your strengths relative to the career readiness competencies and;

2) The subtleties and complexities of integrating into a cross-cultural work environment.

Finally, in addition to personal development, this course gives you a powerful interviewing asset: a story to tell employers. Not a freshman essay of, 'How I spent my semester abroad,' but rather, "This is how working abroad enriched my knowledge, these are the skills I acquired and here's how I hope they can fit in at your company."
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE for Internship Program
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
JOUR 301-070: Journalism in a Free Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JRN 220 Media in a Democracy
An exploration into the purpose of U.S. journalism in a democracy, raising issues of ethics, the First Amendment and the process by which information is gathered and presented by all members of the news community. Covers the impact of history, economics and technology on the future of journalism, as well as the growing importance of news literacy by news consumers.

In Prague, a free media is vital to a free society. In this course we will examine what freedom of the press means and how restrictions placed on the press serve as a detriment to a free and functioning society. We will also look into how media can influence political dialogue and how the changing face of 21st century media can take away from or add to that. We will analyze news coverage and look at the role the news media play in the political systems of modern societies. We will also look at the implications of globalization on the delivery and consumption of news.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ENGL 110.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE
JOUR 311-070: Multimedia Journalism (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JRN 276 Digital Tools for New Media
Focuses on writing and idea communication through a digital medium. Students will learn writing and reporting skills while creating their own news website. Students will learn how to combine those skills with pictures, audio and video to create a complete digital news package.

In Prague, digital technology is radically transforming the practice of journalism, recasting everything from newsgathering to end-user preferences. This class will give students an opportunity to try out currently used digital journalism tools and explore practical and ethical issues related to their use. Students will get hands-on experience documenting events and daily life using a variety of digital media ? photography, video, audio and text. The focus of the class is on reporting for the World Wide Web, social networks as sources of news and opinion, and how to use online storytelling tools effectively. The class assumes some familiarity with blogging, digital photography, audiovisual recording and the software platforms of social networks. Students are strongly advised to have their own computers and cameras (mobile phones are OK), and 360-degree cameras such as the Ricoh Theta are recommended but not required.
LLCU 167-070: Seminar: Elementary Czech (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CZE 101 Elementary Czech
Additional Fee: $200.00

In Prague, Elementary Czech aims at encouraging students to interact in a new language as well as giving them some insights into Czech life so that they can better understand the new cultural environment. The course focuses on everyday communication, introduces essential grammar rules and relevant topics of Czech Studies. It includes a field trip, Czech folk songs and a Czech feature film.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE
LLCU 167-071: Seminar: Elementary Czech Language & Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CZE 100 Elementary Czech Language & Culture
In Prague, this course aims at stimulating students to interact in a new language and cultural environment, and develop their own approach towards the Czech language and culture. The course introduces relevant topics of Czech Studies; the students will comprehend Czech culture, arts and linguistic legacy. Cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts will be provided and discussed. The course is also a journey into the Czech consciousness, soul and values. It explores Czech language and culture that is formed by centuries of traditions. Field trips will be organized and selected films by Czech directors will also be viewed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE
MUSC 101-071: Appreciation of Music (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HSS 200 European Music History & Appreciation
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

Introduction to Western music literature through a nontechnical presentation of various musical styles and forms.

In Prague, this course will introduce students to the world of music through listening and analysis, discussions, history context and visits of live performances. After a brief introduction of basic music elements, forms and instruments, it will provide an overview of major historical periods in Europe (Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and the 20th Century), and their main composers and compositions. In-class listening and concerts visits will improve students' critical thinking as well as understanding and appreciation of music.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Other: CORE COURSE
Restrictions: Not open to MUSC majors.
PHIL 102-070: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHI 125 Introduction to Philosophy
An examination of such central philosophical problems as ethics, theories of knowledge, the nature of reality, philosophy of religion and political philosophy.

In Prague, this course is designed to give students an overview of four major philosophical areas (epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics and politics) through readings and discussion of texts by a selection of noteworthy Western philosophers. Examples from the fields of literature, science and film will be used to illustrate and develop the ideas presented in the texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 204-071: World Religions (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: REL 140 Comparative Religions
Varieties of religious belief and practice from diverse cultures, includingrepresentative Asian and Western traditions, studied mainly in terms of theirhistorical development and importance.

In Prague, this course investigates what religion is and why it remains so potent a force in the world today. We will examine the definition of a religion and survey the major world religions (African Traditional Religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam), as well as postmodern religious relativism.

This course is designed to introduce you to the world's major religions, as well as to explore some crucial questions about religion: What is religion? How can someone compare religions? Are they all true? Why are people drawn to religion? We will explore these and other questions together through lectures, class discussion, and student panel discussions (see course requirements below).
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
POSC 240-071: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IRS 200 Introduction to International Relations
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.

In Prague, this course introduces the student to the history, theories, and practical side of International Relations. Though the term "International Relations" is often the term of preference to describe these three component areas, it is a misnomer, as the field covers and is concerned with sub-state, sub-national, supra-state, supra-national, and nontraditional political actors. These aspects shall also be covered in the course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Other: CORE COURSE
POSC 267-070: Seminar: Politics II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POS 102 Politics II
In Prague, this course aims to help students understand and explain political outcomes, processes and systems through the lenses of main theoretical approaches in comparative politics such as the institutional approach (historical institutionalism, neo and new institutionalism), Marxist approach, cultural approach and rational choice approach. The comparative method is emphasized throughout the course while applying the theories to contemporary case studies on topics ranging from revolutions, political protests, democratization, electoral politics, state formation and social policies.
POSC 270-071: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POS 101 Politics I
Introduction to key concepts and patterns in comparative politics. Topics include democratic processes and democratization, economic and political development, political institutions, and civil society. Cases from different parts of the world are examined to provide a grounding in comparative analysis.

In Prague, this course aims to teach the process and structure of political systems, states and governments from a comparative perspective. Starting from political ideologies, regimes and state institutions, we will move toward the relationship between the citizen and the state (voting, organization of parties, interest groups). Drawing from comparative case studies, it is hoped that students will learn to think analytically about how politics function in a variety of settings and come to appreciate different ways to understand it. Towards this goal, classes will aim to both provide important background to the topics each week as well as to allow time for discussion of the readings.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Global Studies Minor
POSC 285-071: Introduction to Political Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POS 201 Political Philosophy I
Basic introduction to political philosophy, organized not around particular historical periods or specific philosophers, but around some of the most important, enduring questions of political theory: What is the nature of the state? What are the obligations and responsibilities of citizens?

In Prague, this course introduces the students to the study of political philosophy. We will explore some of the most important philosophical questions that shape the way we understand and act in the world of politics. We will read selections from the seminal works of ancient as well as modern political thinkers and tackle such questions as the nature of the state and political power, the justification of political obligation, or the relation between political and economic freedom.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 300: Research Methods for Political Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POS 240 Social Science Research Methods
Introduction to research methods including research design and data analysis.

In Prague, students will learn to design research while using a variety of research methods, theories and concepts. Students will familiarize themselves with all phases of a research project, including philosophy of the research, its design and conduct, the collection, categorization, operationalization and analysis of research data and their evaluation.

You will be asked to work individually and in teams in order to demonstrate your facility with theories and their appropriate use, as well as to hone your research, public presentation and writing skills. Papers and presentations are treated as pedagogical exercises to augment your learning in the course.

Emphasis will be placed on an understanding of a research and the researcher's role. The course is a combination of a lecture and a seminar. The presentation of the material will be followed by discussions of the relevant empirical and theoretical studies.
Prerequisite: Composition 1 and 2
POSC 316-070: International Political Economy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POS 230 Political Economy
Interaction of international political and economic phenomena. Considers history and development of political economy, and the political underpinnings and effects of global monetary, trade, financial and investment systems. Both relations among advanced countries, and between the advanced and poor countries will be considered.

In Prague, this course examines the relationship between politics and economics in modern and contemporary societies, focusing on major issues of both domestic and international policy. Adopting a strong historical perspective, it analyses the role of the government and/or power relations in allocating economic resources in different economic systems (liberal-capitalist, socialist, Marxist, or mixed), the impact of economic relations in international relations as well as the use of economic models in generating change in different societies. After a study of the different scholarly perspectives on political economy, students may also study planning and problem solving, environmental issues, resource distribution, and the challenges of institutional adaptation, and changing political systems as in the cases of Central and Eastern European countries.
Prerequisite: Macroeconomics and Microeconomics
Satisfies the following requirements:
Global Studies Minor
POSC 339-070: European Union (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IRS 221 Contemporary Europe: History of European Integration
The European Union is an economic and political union that binds together twenty-seven European countries. This course provides an overview of the history, institutions, policies and controversies surrounding the European Union.

In Prague, this course is designed for students of political science, international relations and humanities who want to gain a deeper knowledge of the European Union and its integration processes. It will offer the students a comprehensive overview of European integration history, European Union institutions, documents and historical decisions which continue to shape events in present day policy-making.

Throughout the semester, step by step, we will learn about the post WWII context in which European integration took root, the early Communities and the reasons behind their inception, early years of integration and the crises they faced when great political personalities such as Charles de Gaulle or Margaret Thatcher clashed with ideas of supranational governance. We will cover the transformation of economic communities into a political and even a normative project in the post-Cold War era and debate the challenges that await the European Union in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE
POSC 401-070: Topics in Law and Politics: Jurisprudence (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LEG 254 Jurisprudence
In Prague, this upper-level course will introduce the students into philosophical thinking on law. The course is designed to convey a body of knowledge about the jurisprudence and to train the students to use that knowledge to frame and advance arguments relevant to the world today. It will discuss general themes of legal positivism and natural law theories. It opens particular questions, such as: Why do we obey law at all? Where does "legality" end and "revolution" begin? Why isn't law the same thing as justice? Is civil disobedience ever justified in a liberal democracy? Are war crimes tribunals "legal" proceedings or "revenge" proceedings? How can you tell a just and legal war from an unjust and illegal one? Why is an individual's "choice" - as in the case of abortion - considered a positive, Constitutional good? Why does the Anglo-American system of justice make legal resolution into a game while the Civil-Law Tradition stresses the inquisitorial approach?
POSC 464-071: Internship in Poltical Science and International Relations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 349 International Internship
Internship in a political science or international relations-related field. Includes preparation of a journal of activities and a final project.

In Prague, the aim of International Internship: The Multicultural Workplace is to equip you with everything you need to get a job and have a successful career. This course is comprised of two parts:

- First, you'll be placed in an internship within a sector related to your professional ambitions as outlined in the placement process.

- Secondly, you will enroll in an academic seminar where you will analyze and evaluate the workplace culture and the daily working environment you experience. The course is divided into key thematic sections grouped around NACE's eight career readiness competencies which guide the course learning objectives.

During the academic seminar, you will be challenged to reflect weekly on your internship experience within the context of your host culture by comparing and contrasting your experiences abroad with that of your home culture. By creating an intentional time to reflect on your experiences in your internship, the role you have played in the evolution of your experience in your internship placement and the experiences of your peers in their internship placements, you will develop a greater awareness of:

1) Your strengths relative to the career readiness competencies and;

2) The subtleties and complexities of integrating into a cross-cultural work environment.

Finally, in addition to personal development, this course gives you a powerful interviewing asset: a story to tell employers. Not a freshman essay of, 'How I spent my semester abroad,' but rather, "This is how working abroad enriched my knowledge, these are the skills I acquired and here's how I hope they can fit in at your company."
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE for Internship Program
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
PSYC 100-070: General Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to the process of psychological science. Includes coverage of research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, abnormal behavior and treatment, developmental psychology, and social and personality psychology.

In Prague, the objectives of this course includes the following: 1) to help students understand the vocabulary, principles, theories, and models of psychology that build a foundation for understanding our natural world, 2) to help students gain an appreciation that psychology has an experimental basis of scientific inquiry, 3) to help students understand the practical (applied), creative, and cultural dimensions of psychological scientific inquiry, and 4) to help students understand the dynamic interaction between society and psychology as a scientific enterprise, 5) to recognize and appreciate how psychological science uses its knowledge in ethical ways (i.e., promote the human condition), and 6) to help students write about psychology.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 303-070: Introduction to Social Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 250 Introduction to Social Psychology
Analysis of interpersonal behavior with special emphasis on problems of conformity and influence; the organization and dynamics of social groups; and the development of opinions and attitudes.

In Prague, the purpose of this course is to give students an insight into the dynamics between the individual and the society. The focus will be upon realizing how an individual is influenced by the environment, and in return how he/she can influence the environment. Other key topics will be the analysis of social identity and of social development of an individual. The course will also concentrate on forms of social behavior such as prejudices, stereotypes, aggression and altruism.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Does not count toward PSYC majors or minors.
PSYC 367-072: Seminar: Psychoanalysis of Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 361 Psychoanalysis of Art
What is Art? What emotions or sensations do you feel when you create? What is the relationship between art, dreams, mourning, phantasy, symbolization, subjectivity, identity, sexuality and the unconscious? In Prague, this course seeks to introduce the area of overlap between psychoanalysis and art, including the mutual influences, borrowings, and inspirations between these two supposedly separate domains. It includes the psychodynamics of the creative process and what motivates us to do art. It looks at the aesthetic experience, how psychoanalysis can help us understand the powerful phenomenon of being confronted with a work of art, taken in its broadest sense. This leads us to study developments in psychoanalytic aesthetics, explored with various examples from painting, literature and film. Finally, the course looks at the therapeutic aspect of art and at the contemporary clinical practice of art therapy, including experiential art therapy workshops. Previous knowledge of psychoanalysis is not required as this course functions as an introduction to a range of psychoanalytic theories through their application to art.

The course studies the relationship between art and mind including:

- the creative process

- the aesthetic experience

- introduction to key psychoanalytic theories and concepts

- psychoanalytic criticism of specific works of art

- the psychobiography of individual artists

- developments in psychoanalytic aesthetics, with examples from painting, literature and film

- the therapeutic aspect of art and the clinical practice of art therapy.
PSYC 367-071: Seminar: Psychoanalysis of Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 336: Psychoanalysis of Film
Everyone has an experience of film, a film you love or hate, a film which makes you feel good, bad, or ugly. A film to make you laugh, cry or fall in or out of love. A film that makes you think. In Prague, this course studies the psychology of cinema from a psychoanalytic perspective and in addition explores what we can learn about the mind, culture and society through the movies.
PSYC 367-070: Seminar: Psychology of Art & Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 280 Psychology of Art & Culture
In Prague, this course introduces several psychological approaches, including psychological, psychoanalytic, psychosocial, and neuroscientific, to the study of art, culture, and society. Areas of application include film, painting, literature, art therapy, psychohistory, consciousness, dreams, surrealism, gender, ecology, and economics. This course is a required course for a range of further psychological and psychoanalytic courses at AAU, including Psychoanalysis and Art, Psychoanalysis and Society, the Psychology of Environmental Crisis, and Screening Desire/Projecting Anxiety: The Psychoanalysis of Film. This course therefore serves as a foundation for and introduction to the key concepts, theories and approaches necessary for a deeper engagement in the psychoanalysis of culture, but also functions as a stand alone course for all those interested in art, culture, psychology or society to understand the basic tools, concepts and approaches in this area.
SOCI 201-070: Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
An overview of the sociological perspective of the study of society, social organization and social institutions with special emphasis on the social causes and consequences of human behavior.

In Prague, this course introduces students to fundamental theories, concepts, and areas of inquiry in Sociology. Emphasis is placed on economic, socio-historical, and philosophical settings that have prompted reflections on the nature of society and the individual, and on angles from which society may be studied. Students will be introduced to concepts such as class struggle, culture, globalization, gender roles, and the origins of concepts of race and racism. Together we will read works written by both classical and contemporary thinkers while continuously relating the relevance of their ideas to contemporary societies as well as our own lives. At completion of this course, students are able to understand and apply concepts and theories that they have learned to analyze the "world taken for granted" and initiate sociological reflection of their own.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 267-070: Seminar: Sub-Cultures: Lifestyles, Literature, Music (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOC 276 Sub-Cultures: Lifestyles, Literature, Music
Additional Fee: $35.00 * An additional course fee of approximately CZK 800 is charged to cover expenses associated with this course. Amount in USD is estimated and is subject to change based on exchange rate.

In Prague, an elective in the AAU Humanities programs. Provides critical insights into graffiti, street-art, counter-culture, underground, punk, hipsters, psychedelia, alter-globalization movement, etc. Multidisciplinary perspectives of cultural, literary, and media studies are explored. Seminal readings on subcultures are used to discuss the practices of "alternative" urban lives in postindustrial society and certain trends of artistic production. Focus is on political interpretation of youth subversion and disclosures of power mechanisms. Visuals and field trips to graffiti and other subcultural sites are a part of this course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE
UNIV 362-074: Experiential Learning (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 349 International Internship
Learning experience on or off campus under supervision of faculty member. Instructional learning out of class and beyond existing department courses. Non-major required discovery learning experiences such as service learning, fieldwork, co-op, apprenticeship, internship, and independent study.

In Prague, the aim of International Internship: The Multicultural Workplace is to equip you with everything you need to get a job and have a successful career. This course is comprised of two parts:

- First, you'll be placed in an internship within a sector related to your professional ambitions as outlined in the placement process.

- Secondly, you will enroll in an academic seminar where you will analyze and evaluate the workplace culture and the daily working environment you experience. The course is divided into key thematic sections grouped around NACE's eight career readiness competencies which guide the course learning objectives.

During the academic seminar, you will be challenged to reflect weekly on your internship experience within the context of your host culture by comparing and contrasting your experiences abroad with that of your home culture. By creating an intentional time to reflect on your experiences in your internship, the role you have played in the evolution of your experience in your internship placement and the experiences of your peers in their internship placements, you will develop a greater awareness of:

1) Your strengths relative to the career readiness competencies and;

2) The subtleties and complexities of integrating into a cross-cultural work environment.

Finally, in addition to personal development, this course gives you a powerful interviewing asset: a story to tell employers. Not a freshman essay of, 'How I spent my semester abroad,' but rather, "This is how working abroad enriched my knowledge, these are the skills I acquired and here's how I hope they can fit in at your company."
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: CORE COURSE for Internship Program
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
UNIV 373-024: Study Abroad - Prague (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
The Semester in Prague is designed for undergraduate students regardless of major. While on the program, students must maintain full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits). To be considered for acceptance, applicants must complete these steps:
  • Minimum GPA: Participants should have a minimum GPA of 2.80 (on a 4.00 scale).
  • Apply: Complete the on-line application by the deadline, and honestly disclose all discipline violations.
  • Recommendation: Ask a professor to submit a recommendation on your behalf, and make sure this is done by the deadline.
  • Interview: When IGS contacts you to schedule the interview, respond in a timely manner, and arrive on time for your appointment.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please send a copy of your official transcript to: IGS, Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716 USA.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Fall Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,300.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and IGS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in early April.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early August.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Final Tuition based on current year$6,365.00$17,080.00
Final Program Fee$9,350.00$9,350.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (final)$15,715.00$26,430.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,300.00$1,300.00
The rates above may not apply to you if you are a UD graduate student during the time you are studying abroad. Please refer to http://www1.udel.edu/finaid/rates.html for the appropriate rates.
Our partner organization, CEA, has several types of scholarships for which students can apply directly.

The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students does not apply to winter or summer session and is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onMarch 10, 2019
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedMarch 21, 2019
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *early April
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly August
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Sarah Spiegel
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-4408
302-831-6042
sspiegel@udel.edu
File Downloads
Czech Republic and USA - Cultural Differences
Prague - things to do and see
internship guide
sample cover letter and resume
interest meeting ppt
Prague visa guide

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.