Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[93]
Fall 2019: Paris, France - English program
August 26, 2019 - December 14, 2019
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Meetings
Interest Meetings:
11/13/2018 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
11/14/2018 3:30 PM - 4:30 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
02/18/2019 3:45 PM - 4:45 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
02/21/2019 3:45 PM - 4:45 PMIGS conference room, #213 Clayton Hall
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
04/10/2019 5:30 PM - 7:00 PMClayton Hall 213
05/07/2019 5:30 PM - 7:00 PMClayton Hall 213
Program Notes
Program Description
Study in Paris, where urban and suburban areas combine to form one of the largest and most beautiful cities in the world, where Romanesque, Gothic and Modern architecture create a skyline equally stunning by day and by night, where the basilica of Sacre-Coeur atop Montmartre overlooks 2000 years of history, and where the Seine meanders through the city highlighting the Ile de la Cite with its magnificent Cathedral of Notre Dame and the Ile des Cygnes with its smaller copy of the Statue of Liberty. Wander through the Latin Quarter and the Jardin du Luxembourg, and walk along the grand Boulevard St. Germain, where you can stop at one of the many cafes frequented by intellectuals and musicians after World War II. Discover the major open-air market and bazaar, Marche aux Puces at Porte de Clignancourt, at the end of Metro #4. Stroll along the elegant Avenue Montaigne and Rue du Faubourg St. Honore, centers of French haute couture.

The University of Delaware collaborates with CEA Study Abroad, the provider organization which offers courses to U.S. students at its Paris center in the Marais district. CEA's on-site staff make housing and excursion arrangements, manage course offerings and scheduling, inform students about local activities, and assist students if any problems arise. Wireless internet is available at the CEA Center; although there are a small number of computers for students' use, students are nevertheless highly encouraged to bring laptops.

Internships are credit-bearing and available at no additional cost to suitable applicants. Additional materials are required for internship participants (cover letter and resume--see samples downloadable at the bottom of this page). Students should be specific in their cover letter about the type of internship and host organization they are seeking so that the best possible match can be made, commensurate with the student's French language skills and the host organization's needs. Possible work areas could include finance, public relations, communication, social media content, journalism, and others. Although specific placements are not guaranteed, students go through an individualized placement process with the end result being a placement that best aligns to their goals. Students who opt for an internship enroll in a 3-credit course (e.g. COMM 364, POSC 464 etc.--see course list below) and should be prepared to intern for approximately 15 hours per week for eight weeks during the semester. Please refer to the internship guide and syllabus at the bottom of this page for more details about the placement process and general expectations.

Important: CEA requires that students have already completed 1 full year as a registered college/university student at the time of their application to the internship program. Additionally, 3-4 courses directly related to the internship field of interest or 6 weeks full time work in the field is encouraged when applying for internships.

Community Engagement (volunteer) opportunities are available at a variety of organizations throughout Paris; interested students should inquire with CEA staff upon arrival about these possibilities.

Accommodation includes two options:
  • Shared studio apartments: Apartments are populated by two U.S. students attending one of CEA's various programs in Paris and include one common living and sleeping room, bathroom, kitchenette, and washing machine, with all bedding and towels provided.
  • Residence halls: Buildings house 80-200 individuals, with rooms shared among 2-4 U.S., international, and/or French students or young professionals. Residence halls have a shared kitchen and bathroom, coin-operated laundry, and some bedding, but students must supply sheets and towels.
Students can expect a commute of 30-45 minutes via public transportation to their courses and the CEA Center regardless of which housing option they choose. All housing includes internet access.

The Program Fee includes housing, ground transportation from DeGaulle airport upon arrival with the designated time window, several group excursions and events, and international medical insurance. Students should budget additional funds for a public transportation pass, meals, free time travel, visa, and other personal expenses.

The program fee does NOT include airfare or transportation to/from U.S. airports. The program officially begins in Paris. Students will receive detailed travel instructions after acceptance, explaining how and where to purchase their plane ticket. See the Cost section below for estimate airfare. For this program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together. Prior to departure, students will be given instructions regarding pick-up at the Paris DeGaulle airport.

Before departure, students are responsible for applying for and obtaining a visa for France and should budget approximately $350 for this process. Students will receive guidance on visa procedures by the IGS Paris program coordinator but are ultimately responsible for obtaining their own visa.
ACCESSIBILITY: Participants with disabilities should know that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. But UD students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
All course instruction is in English except for French language courses, and classes are populated by other U.S. students participating CEA's program. Students must enroll in 4-5 courses (12-15 credits) for a letter grade (no auditing or pass/fail). One French course OR COMM 263 is required, in addition to 3-4 other courses.

Students wishing to enroll in a French course will take a preliminary placement exam online prior to departure, followed by an on-site oral examination upon arrival to finalize placement.

ART 180-073: Digital Photography for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHT 301 Photography in Paris
Introduces the basics of photography as a way to communicate ideas emphasizing content, composition, and technique. Examines contemporary artists and historic movements through research, gallery visits and lectures. Using a digital camera and visual editing software students create, edit and critique images.

When taught in Paris, the course focuses on how the camera can be used in a foreign environment as an exciting tool of documentary record, cross-cultural understanding, artistic expression and self-discovery. After an introduction to the fundamentals of photography, both traditional and digital, students' cameras will be trained on the city of Paris and the personal experiences absorbed here including the architecture, history, people, and rich culture. As students develop their technical, compositional and critical skills they will create a portfolio of images that will both showcase and celebrate your whole unforgettable study abroad experience.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: open to non-majors
ARTH 199-071: Topics in Art History: 20th Century Art: A History of Modernism (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARH330: 20th Century Art: A History of Modernism
An introduction to great artists and their masterpieces. Topics change with each time of offering. Specific topics may focus on a crucial moment in history, or on a particular theme explored throughout the ages. When offered in Paris, the course analyzes and surveys 20th century artistic expression in one of the most diverse, politically contentious and maddening periods in the history of art. To this end, it examines the origins of Modernism by looking at the late 19th and nearly 20th century artistic efforts (from Courbet, Manet and the Symbolists to the modernist works of the Cubists, Fauves and Futurists) to come to terms with the mechanized, urbanized and politically charged mood of fin-de-siècle industrial society in Europe. From here, and in the company of the Dadaists, Surrealists, cultural dissenters and abstract artists, the course traces the impact on artistic expression of the shattering experience of the Great War, of social revolution in Russia, Germany and later Spain, of interwar economic decline and cultural decadence, of the rise of European Fascism, and of the experience of Total War and barbarism in World War II. The course then follow the evolution of post-war art, through the works of Art Brut creators and New Realists, as part of the social commentary over the ideological struggles of Cold War polarization, mass consumerism, technological change, and social fragmentation in the latter decades of that most violent of centuries.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 239-095: Art and Architecture of Europe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARH 420 A History of Paris: An Architectural Perspective
Primary focus on painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe from the Romanesque to the Modern eras.

When offered in Paris, this course traces the history of Paris from an architectural perspective from the Gallo-Roman times to the 21st Century. The starting point is the conviction that architecture and city planning are more than utilitarian or aesthetic enterprises–that such efforts necessarily involve, and are often dominated by, political and ideological considerations. Therefore, the course analyzes the political and historical forces at work in the many styles of modern French building in order to demonstrate how each style reflects both the contemporary historical forces at work in each period as well as the political aspirations, in both the domestic and international spheres. To this end, students will explore the crucial role played by the Monarchy, the Church, the aristocracy, the French State, the bourgeoisie, and France's many Kings, Emperors and Republican Presidents in the drafting, designing, funding, and constructing of the many grand monuments, public buildings, and private mansions in Paris.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit three times when topics vary.
BUAD 364-070: Business Administration in Practice (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INT 423 International Internship: the Multicultural Workplace
Internship in a business-related field. Includes preparation of a journal of activities and a final project.

When offered abroad, this course is comprised of both a practical internship field component of 20 hours/week and a reflective and theoretical seminar component that together, are purposefully designed to challenge stuents to learn, to engage with, and develop fluency working within a multicultural context, while also strengthening the business competencies necessary to succeed in today’s workplace. Perhaps even more important, the course will cover areas vital to new graduates: job searching, how to present oneself and leveraging one's global and intercultural fluency.
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
BUAD 384-072: Global Business Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 320 International Business
Evaluation of the elements of the national, international, and global environments that influence the context and conduct of international business. Emphasizes aspects of the cultural, political, economic, legal-regulatory, trade, financial, and institutional environments.

In Paris, this course analyses both internal business practices of international firms and external global environments in which they operate. You will acquire essential and specialized knowledge in the many and diverse areas affecting sound and workable international business practices. Among the topics you will consider are the patterns of international trade; the structure and institutions of global finance; the competitive environment of the international marketplace; the basics of international organizational administration; the business operations of multinational firms; the cultural, political-economic and legal-labor factors affecting international business; the cross-cultural marketing and management techniques essential for dealing with foreign values, habits and expectations; and the challenges of ethical and economic constraints imposed upon both manufacturing and human resource management in international markets today.
BUAD 475-073: International Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 320 International Marketing
Analysis of the concepts and practices relating to the marketing of products and services internationally. Focus on the uncontrollable environmental forces facing an international marketer, issues relating to the standardization of marketing strategies across countries and the unique problems of specific international markets.
Prerequisite: BUAD 100 or 301
CIEG 211-070: Statics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGR 380 Statics
Analysis of force systems and equilibrium of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Determination of centers of gravity and of centroids. Analysis of statistically determinate trusses, simple frames and "machines." Introduction to the analysis of beams.

When taught in Paris, This course guides students through statics for engineering, the branch of mechanics that analyzes the forces and torques of bodies in equilibrium. Statics defines quantities such as the moment of a force, the centroid, and moments of inertia that describe how structures and bodies can remain at rest or maintain a constant velocity. Students will learn about trusses, joints, frames, and machines. Students will learn to understand the use of forces and moments and how these combine to achieve equilibrium. As a tool for engineering, statics will provide you with the methods to design structures capable of supporting and moving loads safely and effectively from beams to bridges. The course includes two- and three-dimensional force systems, moments, equivalent systems; trusses, frames, machines; centroids, centers of mass, moments of inertia, friction, internal axial and shear forces, and engineering applications.
Prerequisite: Calculus I (MATH 241) or equivalent
COMM 167-070: Mass Media and the Fashion Industry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 320 Mass Media and the Fashion Industry
In this course, students will explore the relationship between mass media and the fashion industry from 19th century Paris to today's new media platforms and globalized communication networks. And while the fashion industry provides an arena for conventional media business it also involves a coded and complex dialogue among creators, corporations, tastemakers and the masses. The first half of the course addresses therefore the primary forms of conventional fashion media (journalism, photography, film, new media) while the second half of the course emphasizes the media dialogue and diplomacy a well as its value arbitration (representation, taste, status, trend, globalization). As an integral part of this course, students will consider the various interactions between fashion and media by personally conducting interviews or fashion show reports along with a trend analysis in order to gain practical experience in the ways of fashion journalism. The course includes a shared blog component for posting of assignments and critiques of your visits to fashion industry headquarters or exhibitions.
Prerequisite: Introductory courses in Communication or Media Studies are advised
COMM 167-071: Media and Democracy in the Digital Age (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MED 370 Media and Democracy in the Digital Age
This course examines the relationship between the media and democracy with a particular emphasis on the new media technologies and their profound impact on the current, political processes worldwide. The course begins with an overview of the traditional theories of the media’s role in democracy and then will go on to investigate the effects of new communication technologies on the public sphere, media systems, democratic governance, and individual expression. Throughout the course we will study the French media system in depth, but we will also use various other worldwide empirical cases to understand how the media, and the new media technologies in particular, can enhance or undermine democratic processes. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with different media systems and provide a thorough understanding of the media’s role in democracy and its current challenges. Students will learn experientially by becoming citizen journalists themselves and researching and interacting with local players in Paris first-hand.
COMM 263-070: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 340 Communication and Global Competence
Communicative processes in other cultures as well as subcultures in the US will be discussed. Students will become more mindful and aware of their own cultural patterns as well. Difficulties in cross cultural communication will also be discussed.

When taught in Paris, this course explores the interaction between culture and communication and introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to attain global competence. In addition, this course introduces the construct of global competence; creates the opportunity to analyze and evaluate how our own cultural identity influences communication with others; engages interaction with the host culture; and prepares the students with knowledge and skills to be effective and ethical intercultural communicators. This class will include lectures, class discussions, simulations, interactive examples, case studies, media presentations cultural encounters, and field experiences. Required for all students who do not enroll in at least one French language course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
FASH 224-070: Clothing Design and Production: 1600 to the Edwardian Period (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARH 361 Haute Couture in Paris: History of Style & Fashion
Clothing design and production in America and Western Europe since 1600. Study of craft skills, growth of ready-to-wear industry, and Haute Couture.

When taught in Paris, this course is designed as a survey of the past 200 years of designing, making, wearing and commenting upon the clothes we wear. It begins by tracing out the origins of Haute Couture by threading its way back into late 17th century aristocratic circles and their social customs of dress. This historical exploration continues by analyzing the fabric of 18th and 19th century bourgeois mentality, sensibility and insecurity. Taken together, these early fashion and stylistic efforts help students unravel the complexities and diverse impulses of 20th century fashion designers and their creations. This course will also focus on the many benchmarks in women's fashion - the liberation from the corset, the introduction of pants into the women's wardrobe of fashion, the challenge to the textile industry with the arrival of mini-skirts and the explosive impact of the bikini.
Prerequisite: one 20th century European history course recommended
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
FREN 105-070: French I: Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 102 Beginning French II
Introduction to the French language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.

When offered in Paris, as part of active language acquisition, and in order to help you engage in diverse, cultural experiences, the instructor will lead a limited number of discovery excursions into the city of Paris including, but not limited to libraries, museums, theatres, or local bakeries.
FREN 106-070: French II: Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 201 Intermediate French I
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

When taught in Paris, as part of active language acquisition, and in order to help you engage in diverse, cultural experiences, the instructor will lead a limited number of discovery excursions into the city of Paris including, but not limited to libraries, museums, theatres, or local bakeries.
Prerequisite: FREN 105 or 2-3 years of high school French
FREN 107-070: French III: Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 202 Intermediate French II
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, and reading texts of average difficulty. When taught in Paris, as part of active language acquisition, and in order to help you engage in diverse, cultural experiences, the instructor will lead a limited number of discovery excursions into the city of Paris including, but not limited to libraries, museums, theatres, or local bakeries.
Prerequisite: FREN 106 or 4 years of high school French
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
FREN 167-070: Beginning French (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 101 Beginning French 1
This course is designed for the student having had no prior contact with the French language. In order to help students engage in diverse, cultural experiences, the instructor will lead a limited number of discovery excursions into the city of Paris including, but not limited to libraries, museums, theatres, or local bakeries.
FREN 167-071: Beginning French Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 111 Beginning French Conversation
Designed for students beginning university-level French language instruction, this course offers students a structured learning environment for a directed study of French phonetics and the acquisition of beginner-level, action-based conversations appropriate to the immersion experience, such as: ordering at the market, making a medical appointment, reserving a train ticket and booking a hotel to name a few. Over the course of the semester, you will hone your beginning level competences in “oral communication” through an action-based, intercultural approach that will also promote the favorable development of your personality and sense of identity in response to the enriching experience of otherness in both language and culture.
FREN 205-070: French Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 203 Intermediate French Conversation
Practical use of French by means of oral reports and discussions. Emphasis on improvement of basic conversational skills. Grammar review where appropriate, and/or some written work. When taught in Paris, students in the course will develop such conversational skills which will extend, on one hand, from practical, communicative situations to, on the other hand, more complex and demanding acts of speech such as “defending your point of view” and “giving and receiving compliments” among people with whom you are involved in daily life.To this end, you will learn and integrate into your daily usage an extended vocabulary of words, phrases, idioms and expressions. For the many political, cultural and current events and issues raised and debated in class, you will use different levels and styles of French, from the most formal to the most familiar. Conducted entirely in French, this class requires daily preparation as well as a high level of engagement on your part during class meetings.
Prerequisite: FREN 107 or 112 with grade of B or better
Restrictions: not intended for native speakers of French
FREN 208-070: Contemporary France I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CUL 350 French Civilization and Culture
An introduction to contemporary France, its culture, its people, their way of life and the issues confronting them. When taught in Paris, this course engages you in the life and culture of France’s capital city, Paris, in order to encounter, analyze and appreciate French society, culture and behavioral patterns. In this process, you will acquire knowledge of the main events, personalities and periods of the history of France and, importantly, of their ongoing influence over current French life and contemporary ideas. You will also survey the major institutions and power structures of French society and assess how they have changed over the last century. These you will investigate both in class and out in order to better identify and understand the principal ideological, political, social and cultural fault lines in France today.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: taught in English; not for French major credit
FREN 250-070: Introduction to Business French (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 310 Business French
Familiarizes students with characteristics of business French (terminology, syntactical patterns, etc.) and policies and practices of the French business community. When taught in Paris, you will study, analyze, and respond to various scenarios related to the business world: finding a prospective employer, applying for a job, and carrying out basic tasks on the job. Beyond these rote tasks you will also learn about the business environment in France and compare it to that of the United States. Finally you will have the opportunity to interact with business and economic professionals in order to practice your French in authentic situations.
Prerequisite: any 200-level French course
FREN 305-070: French Conversation and Composition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRE 301 Advanced French
Vocabulary building, grammar exercises and compositions. While in Paris, students will engage in discussion of cultural, social and political topics in French-speaking countries.
Prerequisite: FREN 211 and one other 200-level FREN course taught in French.
HOSP 464-070: International Hospitality Internship (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INT 423 International Internship: the Multicultural Workplace
International internship experience working in a hospitality related internship with written reflections on the cultural and business practices of the host country.Internship in a business-related field. Includes preparation of a journal of activities and a final project. When offered abroad, this course is comprised of both a practical internship field component of 20 hours/week and a reflective and theoretical seminar component that together, are purposefully designed to challenge stuents to learn, to engage with, and develop fluency working within a multicultural context, while also strengthening the business competencies necessary to succeed in today’s workplace. Perhaps even more important, the course will cover areas vital to new graduates: job searching, how to present oneself and leveraging one's global and intercultural fluency.
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
HOSP 467-070: The History, Culture & Business of Wine (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOC 310 The History, Culture & Business of Wine
In this introductory survey of the history, culture, and business of the French wine industry, students will gain first-hand knowledge and practical experience in one of Europe’s oldest international commercial and gastronomic ventures. The course introduces the origins, history and role of wine and its production in European society from Roman times to the 20th century. Students will learn how different wines are actually made, from first planting, to vine and grape growth, through to harvesting and the process called vinification–the various stages between picking the grapes and bottling the wine.Students will also gain a basic knowledge of wine chemistry and fermentation and an appreciation of the concept of terroir, all of which contribute to the many and varied attributes of wine products. The course also addresses the structure of the French wine industry, through learning of France’s varied wine regions, AOC and other qualitative classifications, and the many grape varieties used to make wine in Europe.
LEAD 200-070: The Leadership Challenge (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS354CDG Principles of Leadership: Theory and Practice
Introduces students to the challenge of leadership in an increasingly complex, global, and fast-paced world. Provides theoretical bases of leadership while encouraging students to develop their own leadership potential. When offered on this study abroad program, The course will answer the question: What makes someone a good “leader”? By examining the main approaches and exemplifying them through case studies from business organizations, class experiments and dynamic research. In each discussion, you will be given the opportunity to self-assess your leadership capacities, explore your values and core assumptions, and reflect on your own personal history. Through this, you will be able to discover your strengths, and focus on developing the areas that can help you achieve success as a leader, particularly in the business field.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
MATH 243-072: Analytic Geometry and Calculus C (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 245 CDG Calculus III
In this course you will cover material dealing with functions of multivariable calculus. These mathematics are an important tool in science and engineering and an extensions of the concepts from first and second-semester calculus. The content of this course will thus focus on: curves and surfaces in Euclidean 3-space, length and curvature, area and volume; surfaces, partial derivatives, total differential, tangent planes to surfaces; gradient; vector-valued functions; path integral; Stokes’ theorem, Green’s Theorem, and Divergence Theorem.In addition to these cognitive and knowledge skills, students in this course will consider the contributions of the French in science, mathematics, technology, and engineering as well as explore practical applications of math and science to the field of engineering.
Prerequisite: MATH 242
Restrictions: Includes use of computers to perform symbolic, numerical and graphical analysis. Students must download UD's Mathematica software prior to departure and bring their laptop with them to Paris.
PHIL 202-070: Contemporary Moral Problems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL/SUS 320 Environmental Ethics: Humans, Culture & Sustainability
The application of philosophical techniques to contemporary moral problems such as abortion, punishment, biomedical ethics, reverse discrimination and sexual morality. When taught in Paris, the aim of this course is to explore ethical and conceptual issues regarding the creation of ecologically sustainable societies. What exactly should we seek to sustain and why? What would a genuinely sustainable society look like? The course explores the philosophical foundations of a plausible environmental ethic that may reconcile human responsibilities towards nature to our ongoing quest for flourishing and self-understanding in a globalized, highly interconnected, overpopulated, and ecologically deteriorating world. The course examines such issues as the impact of different worldviews upon environmental behavior; our responsibilities to non-human nature and to future generations; climate change and the challenges it poses to our moral psychology and our ethical and political systems.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 204-070: World Religions (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: REL 310 World Religions
Varieties of religious belief and practice from diverse cultures, includingrepresentative Asian and Western traditions, studied mainly in terms of theirhistorical development and importance.When taught in Paris, the course also pays close attention to the multicultural and multiethnic realities of contemporary Europe and France, in particular, by offering platforms for interfaith dialogue and special visits to la Mosquée de Paris and la Grande Synagogue de Paris.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
POSC 309-070: Political Culture by Country: France (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POL 362 Current Political Issues in France
This course provides a survey and analysis of the major political, ideological, social, economic and cultural issues confronting France in the early 21st century. Students will first receive an overview of France’s quest for domestic political and social stability as well as international stature and cultural recognition abroad since the founding of the Fifth Republic in 1958.The course then turns to the many political issues determining the form and substance of political debate and decision-making in France today. These include the political fallout and ramifications of the 2012 presidential and legislative elections; France’s ongoing struggle to respond effectively to Greek debt and the related financial and identity crisis it is provoking in the EU; the many initiatives in France for reforming French political institutions; the current debates over what to do about unemployment, immigration, retirement, financial and fiscal regulation, cultural policies, health care, energy policy, education, housing, gender equality, discrimination; and finally what foreign policy role France can play both in sustaining European integration and in responding constructively to the Arab spring.
Prerequisite: One introductory course in Political Science
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
POSC 409-081: Topics in World Politics: Globalization: Politics, Culture & Governance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IRS 331 Globalization: Politics, Culture & Governance
The word Globalization is one of the more fashionable additions to the lexicon of international relations pundits have made since the end of the Cold War. Widely used, frequently abused and generally misunderstood, the term today has however become so clouded in cliché and indeterminacy that it risks meaning almost nothing at all. To remedy this situation, we set out in this course to investigate, analyze and reassess the elusive historical and social concept of globalization, looking closely at its manifold forms, varied content and troubling consequences. Employing the tools of sociology and the analytical methods of political science, we embark on an interdisciplinary investigation of the theory and practice of globalization. Students will simultaneously develop the requisite skills for identifying this phenomenon in current events, for situating it in the larger context of international relations, and for understanding the meaning and role of global governance as a logical and appropriate response to this phenomenon.
Prerequisite: Introduction to International Relations, Political Science or Sociology
Satisfies the following requirements:
Global Studies Minor
POSC 445-070: Human Rights and World Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 350 Human Rights: Universal Principles in World Politics
Alternative theories of human rights examined in cross-cultural and international contexts. International documents, contemporary cases (e.g. France) and U.S. foreign policies also examined and evaluated. When taught in Paris, This course provides a survey and analysis of the problems and challenges of setting and upholding universal standards of respect for international human rights in contemporary world politics. This requires an initial review of the historical, religious, and intellectual background here in Europe that gave rise to the early legal theories and doctrines upon which modern international human rights law would come to be based. The course will also address the difficult task of defining universal principles of human rights, of determining the content of such rights, of considering the different cultural and theoretical approaches to these rights, and of creating effective methods of monitoring and enforcement of human rights standards.
Prerequisite: Introductory courses in International Relations and 20th century European or world history are recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Global Studies Minor
POSC 464-072: Internship in Political Science and International Relations: Paris - English Program (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INT 423 International Internship: the Multicultural Workplace
Internship in a political science or international relations-related field. Includes preparation of a journal of activities and a final project. When offered abroad, this course is comprised of both a practical internship field component of 20 hours/week and a reflective and theoretical seminar component that together, are purposefully designed to challenge stuents to learn, to engage with, and develop fluency working within a multicultural context, while also strengthening the business competencies necessary to succeed in today’s workplace. Perhaps even more important, the course will cover areas vital to new graduates: job searching, how to present oneself and leveraging one's global and intercultural fluency.
Prerequisite: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
UNIV 362-072: Experiential Learning (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INT 423 International Internship: the Multicultural Workplace
When offered abroad, this course is comprised of both a practical internship field component of 20 hours/week and a reflective and theoretical seminar component that together, are purposefully designed to challenge stuents to learn, to engage with, and develop fluency working within a multicultural context, while also strengthening the business competencies necessary to succeed in today’s workplace. Perhaps even more important, the course will cover areas vital to new graduates: job searching, how to present oneself and leveraging one's global and intercultural fluency.
Restrictions: Enrollment contingent upon timely internship application and successful interview with sponsoring organization.
UNIV 373-041: Study Abroad - Paris English (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
The Semester in Paris is designed for sophomores, juniors, and seniors regardless of major and background in French, though some knowledge of the language is beneficial, particularly for those choosing the residence hall accommodation. A minimum 2.8 grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) is required. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please send a copy of your official transcript to: IGS, Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716 USA.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Fall Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,200.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and IGS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in early April.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early August.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Final Tuition based on current year$6,365.00$17,080.00
Final Program Fee$9,850.00$9,850.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (final)$16,215.00$26,930.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,200.00$1,200.00
The rates above may not apply to you if you are a UD graduate student during the time you are studying abroad. Please refer to http://www1.udel.edu/finaid/rates.html for the appropriate rates.
Our partner institution, CEA, offers several types of scholarships to which students can apply directly.

The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students does not apply to winter or summer session and is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onMarch 10, 2019
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedMarch 21, 2019
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *early April
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly August
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Kimberly Sorlin
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-2852
ksorlin@udel.edu
File Downloads
internship guide
sample cover letter and resume
internship course syllabus
Paris 19F interest meeting ppt
France Visa Procedures
CEA Emergency US contact info for UD staff or student families

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.