Program Information
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Fall 2021: World Scholars - Rome, Italy
September 01, 2021 - December 11, 2021 (dates are tentative)
Applications will be accepted beginning Saturday, May 01 2021.
Please contact the faculty director for more information.
Meetings
Program Notes
This program's deadline has been changed to 05/31/2021.
World Scholars - Rome is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program.
Program Description

The University of Delaware World Scholars Program is a four-year program for internationalizing a student's undergraduate career. Choosing from a wide range of majors, World Scholars are supported in their studies with internationally-focused academics, experiences, and opportunities that will prepare them to live and work anywhere in the world.

Class of 2024 UD World Scholars will study abroad twice, including fall semester of their sophomore year in Greece, Italy, Spain or New Zealand, and in any of 40+ destinations during their junior year.

Scholars heading to Rome, “la città eterna,” will study at our partner institution, John Cabot University (JCU), an accredited, degree-granting liberal arts institution enrolling over 800 students originating from across the U.S. and the world. JCU’s location in the trendy, bohemian Trastevere neighborhood not far from the Vatican and the banks of the Tiber make it ideally situated for students wishing to live and learn amidst a unique blend of the ancient and the contemporary.

John Cabot’s facilities include the Guarini campus with its patio and courtyard, whose entry gate dates from the third century, and the Tiber campus, just a ten-minute walk away. Both contain classrooms and offices and are equipped with wireless internet. JCU’s status as a full-fledged secondary educational institution means that it offers an array of services similar to those of a small U.S.-based campus and to which UD students have access, for example student clubs, sports activities, library, cultural and social events, counseling services, and a residence life staff.

Courses are taught by JCU’s approximately 100 international faculty, many of whom were educated in the United States. Instructional methods and grading are based on the U.S. system. Instruction takes place in English except for foreign language courses. UD students will take Introduction to Global Politics (POSC 240) together and may then choose additional options from a menu of recommended courses. Some of the courses include out-of-class experiences around Rome to take advantage of the city’s historic and artistic resources, which may require an additional fee.

UD World Scholars will live in a residence hall on the campus of John Cabot University, and will have upperclass residence assistants living with them. Students in this program will also benefit from the time and expertise of an additional staff member in Rome who will be assigned exclusively to the UD cohort. This individual will serve as 24/7 staff support to the students and as a liaison between the University of Delaware and faculty and staff at our partner institution, John Cabot University. This staff member will also gather students throughout the semester for excursions for special opportunities and excursions that take advantage of this incredible geographic location.

The program fee covers housing, medical insurance, some meals, airport transfers in Rome for those traveling on the recommended flights, orientation week activities, numerous excursions throughout the fall, opening and closing celebrations and full access to all JCU facilities and activities.

It does not include the cost of an Italian visa or Permit to Stay; students should budget approximately $250 for these documents. IGS staff will assist students with the visa application process.

NOTE: The program fee does NOT include airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Rome. For planning purposes only, airfare is estimated at $1,400. Students who wish to travel with the UD representative, must book the recommended flights.

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Before making the decision to study abroad, students with disabilities should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some study abroad locations may differ from the United States. Review our Diversity Abroad information with your family. You are also welcome to speak with World Scholar Program leadership to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Honors credit may be available. Check with the faculty director and the Honors program for approval (check before departure).
All courses are taught in English and meet UD graduation requirements.

Scholars will enroll in POSC 240 Introduction to Global Politics and will select three or four additional courses.

Class of 2024 World Scholars will attend a workshop on 11/11/2020 about mapping their academic plan. World Scholars should should review their major course requirements and meet with their academic advisor(s) to determine which courses keep them on track with their academic plan. Additionally, Scholars should select as many alternate course options that could be taken and keep them on track towards graduation due to potential time conflicts or courses not being offered.

World Scholars who do not see a course listed below that they need to take in Fall 2021 should email Meghan (gladlem@udel.edu). The email should include:
--Course code (ex. SPAN 301)
--Reason why you need to take this course - what requirement does the course fill for you?
--Confirm if your advisor agrees that you need to take this course

Please note that the courses listed below have been reviewed by UD departments and approved as UD course equivalencies. This is a comprehensive list and not ALL of these courses may be offered in Fall of 2021. Course offerings are subject to change. A list of offered courses will be available in late spring. IGS will notify both students and their academic advisors.
ART 180-073: Digital Photography for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 199: Basic Photography
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 204: Media/Design/Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 111: Introduction to Visual Communication
From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
ART 230-000: Figure Drawing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 212: Figure Drawing
Figure drawing is the traditional basis for training the artist’s eye and hand. Through specific exercises, students learn to control line and gesture, to model form in light and dark, and to depict accurately the forms and proportions of the human body.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 231-072: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 204: Beginning Painting
This course introduces the basic issues of oil painting through a series of classic problems: the still life, figure study, portrait and others. Emphasis is on control of color and light and dark value, while building form in a coherent pictorial space. Oil is the preferred medium, and students buy their own materials. The course introduces connections between studio work and the history of painting.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 233-070: Drawing as Study (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 110: Drawing (Rome Sketchbook)
This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 281: Darkroom Photography (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 105: Introduction to Photography
This course creates a foundation of knowledge of photographic history, theory, and practice, and is recommended as preparation for further study in photography. Students will encounter technical issues concerning both film and digital photography, including basic issues of camera functions and controls, darkroom procedures, and digital techniques and software. The course examines a broad range of subjects such as: the early history of photography, photographic genres, use of artificial and of natural light, and various modes of presentation and archival management. Shooting pictures is balanced with classroom work. The course will help students develop a formal and critical vocabulary, an understanding of the uses of photography, and inspiration for more advanced photo courses.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 101-000: Visual Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 141: World Art I: Visual Culture of the Ancient World
This survey course focuses on the art, archaeology and architecture of the Mediterranean world, roughly between 2500 BC – AD 300. The course investigates the material culture of the diverse cultural groups that shaped this cosmopolitan world: Sumerians, Assyrians, Minoans/Mycenaeans, Egyptians, Greeks, Etruscans, Persians, Italics and Romans. Special attention will be given to the interconnectivity and dynamic relationship of inspiration between these cultures. The aim is for a firm contextual understanding of the works examined, and of the cultural, political and historical aspects that shaped these. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
ARTH 199-070: Topic in Art History: Rome, Ostia, and Pompeii I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 190: Cities, Towns and Villas: Rome, Ostia, Pompeii
Rome, Ostia and Pompeii are three of the best- preserved archaeological sites in the world. Through their study, we are able to comprehend the physical and social nature of Roman cities and how they transformed over the course of centuries. We explore the subjects of urban development, public and private buildings, economic and social history, and art incorporated into urban features (houses, triumphal monuments, etc.). In Rome, we focus primarily upon public buildings commissioned by Senators and Emperors: temples, law courts, theaters, triumphal monuments, baths. In Ostia, the port-city of Rome, we are able to experience many aspects of daily life: commerce, housing, religion, entertainment. Pompeii represents a well-to-do Republican and early Imperial period city that was influenced by the Greeks and Romans and preserves some of the most magnificent frescoes in the world.

--On-site; mandatory trip; activity fee: €40 or $52

--STUDENTS SHOULD NOT REGISTER FOR BOTH AH190 and AH290
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199: Topics in Art History: Politics and Power in Roman Architecture - Augustus to Mussolini (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 181: Politics and Power in Roman Architecture - Augustus to Mussolini
This on-site survey investigates the history of Rome primarily through its monuments—its architecture and urban form. This course will provide the student with a clear grasp of how the city of Rome has changed over the course of two thousand years from a modest Iron Age settlement on the Palatine Hill to a thriving modern metropolis of the twentieth century. The student will become intimately acquainted with the topography, urban makeup and history of the city and its monuments and will acquire the theoretical tools needed to examine, evaluate and critically assess city form, design and architecture.

--On-site; activity fee: €25 or $33
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 199-000: Topics in Art History: The Art and Architecture of Imperial Rome (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 223: The Art and Architecture of Imperial Rome
The course focuses on the vibrant period between the 2nd century BC and the 4th century AD, which constituted the height of Roman power within a sprawling and culturally diverse Empire. It follows an overarching chronological format complemented by thematic investigations focused on particular media, locations, or traditions. In this way, portraiture and statues; mosaics; relief works; and wall painting will all be discussed for their intrinsic artistic value, for their stylistic development over time, and as shaped by the particular outlook of their patrons and their intended viewership. The course addresses themes like the impact of Greek art, elite and non-elite art, and what it meant to be 'Roman' in a multicultural empire.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 236-000: Arts of the Islamic World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 265: Islamic Art and Architecture: AD 650-1250
This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from the 7th to the 13th centuries. The phenomenal rise and establishment of Islamic civilization in three continents- Asia, Africa and Europe- in this period is studied through monumental religious and secular architecture and its applied decoration from mosaics to stucco and wall paintings and through painted ceramics, carved wood and ivories, metalwork, illuminated manuscripts, and embroidered and woven textiles. The form and function of buildings and artifacts, their changing patterns of use and their evolving meanings are examined in their original social, political, religious, and cultural contexts. One of the primary aims is to become familiar with the regional diversity of medieval Islamic visual culture and so also to consider what issues are involved in studying a tradition that flourished in several geographical areas, encompassing a variety of cultures and national and ethnic identities. Two special areas of focus are the urban design and architecture of Islamic medieval centers such as Cairo and Islamic court culture which, often centered around royal palaces such as Madinat al-Zahra in Spain, produced some of the most outstanding luxury arts of the Middle Ages.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-000: Art and Architecture of Europe: Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 220: Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology
This upper level survey of Greek art and archaeology focuses on the visual culture of Ancient Greece in the Aegean and Western Mediterranean during the first millennium BCE. Students are introduced to a broad range of the extant evidence: architecture, sculpture, painted pottery, and objects of daily life. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between visual culture and religion, mythology, politics. The course begins with an introduction to the history of the discipline of Classical Archaeology and an overview of pre-historic Greece.

--Mandatory overnight trip to Naples and Paestum which may require a fee.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-000: Art and Architecture of Europe: Ancient Roman Portraiture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 354: Ancient Roman Portraiture
Portraiture in Greece and Rome was a vital currency of social interaction and public engagement - across gender, class, location and context. As new archaeological data and research methodologies are transforming our understanding of its form and impact, the field is one of the most vibrant of ancient art. The course will discuss all aspects of what made a portrait: facial characteristics, hairstyles, body types, and clothing, as well as the inscribed base and placement. It will do so with a keen awareness of the developments and experimentations of the medium over time. The course will investigate themes like the uses of male and female portraits in public, the use of type-associations and role models, and the choices of statue types and status indicators. It will ask questions about who commissioned works, about workshop practices and distribution, and about the visual impact of techniques and form for the viewer, as well as why some portraits were destroyed or reworked.
Prerequisite: One previous course in Art History or Classical Studies or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-000: Art and Architecture of Europe: Italian High Renaissance Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 296: Italian High Renaissance Art
An extension of the study of Italian art and architecture in the Renaissance through the second half of the 15th century into the first three decades of the 16th. The works of Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Pollaiuolo, and others will be studied, along with works by those whose innovations initiated the High Renaissance style: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bramante, and Raphael.

--Site visits are an essential part of the course and may require a fee.

--Partially on-site; mandatory 3-day trip to Florence
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239: Art and Architecture of Europe: Medieval Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 291: Medieval Rome and Its Monuments
Rome City Series - An on-site survey of Roman urbanism, as well as developments in figural media and architecture, from the 4th to the 14th century. While the course will naturally emphasize the abundant religious art remaining in the city, it will also examine such secular achievements as towers, housing, defenses, and roads.

--On-site; activity fee: €25 or $33
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-000: Art and Architecture of Europe: Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 294: Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments
Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions of painting and sculpture within a socio-historic framework.

--On-site; activity fee: €25 or $33
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
BUAD 301-000: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 301: Principles of Marketing
This course will give students a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the strategic marketing planning process including: methods and tools of market assessment, customer segmentation analysis, development of the value proposition, positioning and planning of marketing tactics designed to deliver value to targeted stakeholders. Emphasis is placed on the need to align marketing principles and theories with the management skills needed for the preparation of a marketing plan. Students will be able to analyze opportunities and threats in both the macro and micro-environments. Students will also conduct a marketing research gathering data for effective decision-making and will develop their ability to evaluate gaps. In this course, students will begin to learn how to conduct a competitive analysis, analyze environmental trend, forecast changing market demand and develop competitive marketing strategies.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
BUAD 306-000: Introduction to Service and Operations Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 330: Operations Management
Management issues related to the procurement and allocation of resources in the production of goods and services in order to meet organizational goals. Topics covered include product and process design, facility size, location and layout, quality management, production planning and control.
BUAD 309-000: Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 310: Organizational Behavior
The course examines the disciplinary foundations of organizational behavior, the major conceptual models that purport to explain organizational behavior, the methods used to study organizations, and the trends in the field. Content is based on basic concepts of motivation, control, change, and team building, as well as the development of effective relationships in a diverse work environment. Note: this course is intensive in that students are asked to write individual papers, work in groups to formulate plans to resolve real life situations as described in various case studies, and present their recommendations to the assembled class.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
COMM 212: Oral Communication in Business (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 101: Public Speaking: Oral Rhetoric and Persuasion
This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.
Restrictions: Not open to communication and communication interest majors.
COMM 245-070: Mass Communication & Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 220: Media, Culture and Society
This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society—none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
COMM 325: Studio Television Production (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 230: Foundations of Digital Video Production
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
COMM 340: Politics and the Media (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMS 324: Political Communication
The course explores the relationship between media and the electoral process. Students will examine the history and current status of media, campaigns and elections, as well as how they interact to help shape public attitudes about key events and policy decisions. The course aims to build a foundation of issues and developments in the relationship between political actors and the press, so that students gain the skills and knowledge needed to critically evaluate and contextualize contemporary elections. At the end of the semester, students will be able to 1) identify the major developments in the relationship between political actors and the press; 2) understand the current role of the news media and other forms of communications in the electoral process and 3) demonstrate the skills and knowledge needed to critically evaluate contemporary and future elections from a media and communications perspective.
ECON 101-071: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 201: Microeconomics
This course introduces the students to the basic principles of microeconomics and the study of the behavior of individual agents, such as consumers and producers. The first part of the course reviews the determinants of supply and demand, the characteristics of market equilibrium, the concept of social welfare, and the consequences of price controls, taxation, and externalities on social welfare. The second part of the course deals with market theory, with a review of cost concepts and market structures: competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect competition.
Prerequisite: MATH114, MATH115, MATH221, MATH241 or higher.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 103-071: Introduction to Macroeconomics: The National Economy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 202: Macroeconomics
An introduction to the basic principles of the macro economy, such as national income accounting, determination of national income, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, macroeconomics in the open economy, and economic growth.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ENGL 102-000: Texts in Time: Study of the Works of a Single Modern Writer (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 346: Study of the Works of a Single Modern Writer
This course focuses on the work of one writer from the nineteenth century to the present. This course may be taken more than once for credit when different writers are studied. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
ENGL 102-000: Texts in Time: The Literature of Crime and Punishment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 235: The Literature of Crime and Punishment
This course explores the themes of crime and punishment in modern literature, with particular emphasis on the treatment of guilt (and the attendant concepts of legal and moral responsibility) as it is experienced by the individual consciousness of the perpetrator, of the accused, and in the relation between jailer and prisoner. Students in the course will see how literature, through its unique methods and concerns, is able to alert the reader to different understandings of the social, moral, ethical, and philosophical implications of what is only apparently a simple dichotomy between innocence and guilt, right and wrong, or good and evil. Each text or group of texts will be accompanied by an introductory definitional or theoretical reading from thinkers like Foucault, Benjamin, Arendt, and Nietzsche, that will serve not as an explicatory key, but as a guiding light in an exploration of the texts. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
ENGL 204: American Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 223: American Literature
The course deals with a chronological historical coverage of the development of American literature from the 17th century until modern times. Attention is given to the major historical, philosophical and literary movements that shaped American literature such as Puritanism, Transcendentalism, and American realism. Major canon American writers will be studied and analyzed. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ENGL 206: British Literature 1660 to Present (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 231: English Literature II: The Enlightenment to Romanticism
A continuation of the survey begun in EN 230, this course deals with works by major British writers in the period 1660 to 1832. Approximately equal attention is devoted to writers of the Restoration (excluding Milton) and 18th century, and to writers of the Romantic Movement. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ENGL 207: Introduction to Poetry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 210 Introduction to Poetry and Poetics
Major theories concerning the nature and source of poetic talent and a consideration of the traditional aspects of prosody and poetic form. The course emphasis falls upon competence with poetry as an art form rather than upon the knowledge of particular poets or literary periods.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 209-070: Introduction to the Novel (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 205: Introduction to the Novel
The course traces various developments in the genre of the novel from the 17th to the 20th centuries through a reading of selected representative texts. In addition, students are required to consider these works alongside of the development of theories about the novel. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 210-070: Introduction to the Short Story (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 211: The Short Story
By examining short stories, this course develops students’ critical abilities in reading and writing about narrative fiction. The students are introduced to a comparative perspective on literature and learn to identify and evaluate the short story’s formal elements, acquiring the skill to read fiction critically, to look beyond the content, to appreciate the ambiguities and complexities of the literary text, and to communicate their findings in critical papers of academic quality. The selection of short stories may vary, offering a historical perspective, a thematic one, or a selection of masterpieces in the genre.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 217-070: Introduction to Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 210: Introduction to Cinema
This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 280: Approaches to Literature for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 200 Introduction to Literature
This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing. Presupposing no previous knowledge in particular of literature, the course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in the three genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned texts, use various critical approaches, and write several critical essays on specified readings.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 284-000: Shakespeare for non-majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 245 Shakespeare
This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non-majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 221 Masterpieces of World Literature
The course is a study of representative works of world literature that can be selected from antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the 19th century and modern ages. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the western and non-western literary traditions. An important goal of the course is to promote an understanding of the works in their cultural/historical contexts and of the enduring human values which unite the different literary traditions. The course's pedagogy gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. Readings may include works of poetry, epics, drama and novels. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 300: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 215 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theories
Designed as an introduction to the theoretical approaches to literature, the course will stimulate students to think and write critically through the study of the principal topics of literary theory. The course will adopt both a historical approach, covering each theory in the chronological order of its appearance on the scene, and a critical approach - putting the theories to the test by applying them to a literary text. The course will also help students to move on to an advanced study of literature by introducing them to the research methods and tools for the identification, retrieval, and documentation of secondary sources.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
ENGL 305: Fiction Writing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 285 Literature and Creative Writing: How to Read Like a Writer
To supplement their traditional university study of composition and literary analysis, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills at reading literature as a source of help in improving their own writing. Designed primarily for students interested in creative writing, this course focuses on the reading of literature from the point of view of the practice, or craft, of fiction writing. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
ENGL 307: News Writing and Editing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DJRN 221 Introduction to News Reporting and Writing
This course introduces writing and reporting techniques for the mass media. It focuses on the essential elements of writing for the print, online and broadcast media. The course also covers media criticism, ethics in media, and the formats and styles of public relations.
ENGL 318: Studies in Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMS 360 Studies in Film: Race and Gender in Popular Media
Using contemporary theoretical approaches, this course examines both Race and Gender as social constructions, and the role and function of Cinema and Television texts in circulating and contesting those constructions. Focusing on analyzing Cinema and Television texts for their construction of meaning, this course looks at the complex ideological operations at stake in the operations, maintenance, and resistance to meanings constructed around race and gender.
ENGL 318: Studies in Film: Cinematic Rome (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMS/ITS 243 Cinematic Rome
An analysis of the social, aesthetic, political, and rhetorical implications of cinematic representations of Rome, from silent films to the present. This course will evaluate and discuss ten primary films, along with excerpts from a number of others. We will consider five main topics: Images of Ancient Rome; Before and After World War II; "Americans" in Rome, and Rome in America; Fellini’s Rome; and Urban Angst, Roman Style. As the semester progresses, we will consider how Rome functions as a "character" in the movies, as well as how The Eternal City comprises the mise-en-scène. We will assess the artistic representations of Roman monuments and streetscapes on movie sets, as opposed to location shooting. Special attention will be given to memory construction, as well as the rhetoric of "places and spaces" (how the physical/symbolic setting influences us). In this course, students will visit cinematic landmarks in Rome and write about their experiences
ENGL 324-071: Shakespeare (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 245: Shakespeare
This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
FASH 355: Global Fashion Consumer and Retailers (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 330 International Business
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business, with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.
FINC 311-000: Principles of Finance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FIN 301 Finance
This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The main areas covered include an overview of the financial system and the efficiency of capital markets, evaluation of financial performance, time value of money, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, international financial management, capital structure management, and the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Condu
FREN 105-070: French I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 101: Introductory French I
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in French. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.



Notes: FREN 105, All sections are for students who have never studied French or who have taken 2 years or less of French in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
FREN 106-070: French II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 102: Introductory French II
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Notes: FREN 106, All sections are for students who have taken 2 or 3 years of French in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
Prerequisite: PREREQ: FREN105
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Two to three years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
FREN 107: French III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 201
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, and reading texts of average difficulty.
Prerequisite: FREN 106; ?Four years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite. Satisfies College of Arts and Sciences language requirement.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
GREK 102-070: Elementary Ancient Greek II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GRK 102: Introduction to Greek II
After a brief review of key grammar and morphology from Greek 101, the course will complete the process of providing students with a sufficient grasp of Greek vocabulary, morphology and syntax to enable them to read unadapted passages from ancient Greek authors (with the aid of a lexicon) by the end of the course. There will be short readings of selections from Aesop, Lucian and Greek epigrams.
Prerequisite: GREK101 or equivalent
HIST 101-071: Europe and the World to 1648 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HS 120: Introduction to Western Civilization I
This survey course explores the foundations of Western societies and cultures and the transformations they underwent from prehistory through the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which diverse ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern peoples interacted to lay the groundwork for Western civilization, the ways in which political structures and cultures changed over the time period covered, and the development of Western religions and cultures. In addition, through the examination and discussion of a range of primary source materials, the course serves as an introduction to the practice of history, i.e., how historians examine the past and draw conclusions about it.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 102: Europe and the World since 1648 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HS 210 Nineteenth-Century Europe and the World
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the development of new political ideologies and systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 341-070: Ancient Rome (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL/HS 231: History of Ancient Rome and Italy
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ITAL 105-070: Italian I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 101: Introductory Italian:
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.
ITAL 106-070: Italian II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 102: Introductory Italian II
A continuation of IT101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Italian I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.
Prerequisite: ITAL105 Two to three years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
ITAL 107: Italian III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 201
A continuation of IT 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student’s ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with contemporary Italy.
Prerequisite: ITAL 106; Four years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite. Satisfies College of Arts and Sciences language requirement.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
ITAL 200: Italian Grammar Review (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 202 Intermediate Italian II
A continuation of IT 201. While continuing the review of grammar, the course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills. Short stories, newspaper articles, and films supplement the textbook.
ITAL 206: Culture Through Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 301 Advanced Italian I
This course is designed to move students forward toward advanced proficiency in Italian language. The course will reinforce students’ oral, writing, listening, and reading skills, while refining grammar structures studied in previous levels. Contemporary literary and journalistic texts, films and film excerpts, newspaper articles and other multimedia materials will acquaint students with central elements of Italian culture and traditions, while individual and group activities drawn from real-life contexts will give them the opportunity to integrate their knowledge and skills through experience.
Prerequisite: Placement test or permission of instructor
LATN 101-070: Elementary Latin I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LAT 101: Elementary Latin I
This course is a first introduction to the study of the Latin language. The course introduces all forms of nouns and pronouns in the five declensions and all tenses of the verb in the indicative and imperative. It emphasizes vocabulary development and the acquisition of reading skills in Latin prose. Assignments include considerable reading of continuous passages and translation from Latin to English and English to Latin. Attention is also given to Latin proverbs, abbreviations and cognates in English.
LATN 102: Elementary Latin II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LAT 102 Elementary Latin II
This course provides continued study of accidences and syntax, treating all tenses of the verb in the subjunctive, indirect discourse, paraphrastic constructions and deponents. Vocabulary development is continued through intensive reading of selections of Latin prose. Students are also introduced to verse forms and the study of inscriptions. Assignments focus on translation from English to Latin and Latin to English.
LATN 301: Advanced Intermediate Latin Prose (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LAT 282 Directed Readings in Latin
This course is designed to offer the opportunity to read texts in the original to students with a basic level of Latin language preparation. The level of readings may range from intermediate to advanced. Language levels will be determined at the beginning of the course, and students will be arranged in suitable reading groups. Texts appropriate to each group’s level will be chosen by the professor and the individual students. Texts will vary, but advanced students may choose from among annotated editions of Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, and Livy. All groups will work independently and in weekly reading groups with the professor, when issues of language, grammar, and literary technique will be discussed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
LLCU 316: Classical Mythology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 260 Classical Mythology
The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
LLCU 330: World Literatures and Cultures: Classical Rhetoric and Oratory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL/RH 372 Classical Rhetoric and Oratory
An examination of the nature, purpose, and place of rhetoric in classical antiquity, as conceived and practiced by ancient Greeks and Romans. Readings (in translation) include the use and conceptualization of an art of persuasion by Gorgias, Plato, Isocrates, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Cicero, Quintilian, and Augustine. This course prepares students to evaluate the use (and abuse) of devices and techniques of classical rhetoric in contemporary politics, economics, marketing, media, and visual arts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
LLCU 330: World Literatures and Cultures: Italian Cinema (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMS/TH 241: Italian Cinema
This course surveys films, directors, and film movements and styles in Italy from 1945 to the present. The films are examined as complex aesthetic and signifying systems with wider social and cultural relationships to post-war Italy. The role of Italian cinema as participating in the reconstitution and maintenance of post-War Italian culture and as a tool of historiographic inquiry is also investigated. Realism, modernism and post-modernism are discussed in relation to Italian cinema in particular and Italian society in general. Films are shown in the original Italian version with English subtitles.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 330: World Literatures and Cultures: Literature and Society in Ancient Greece (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 268 Literature and Society in Ancient Greece
This course introduces students to the civilization of the ancient Greeks through an in-depth study of ancient Greek literature and society from the eighth century B.C.E. through the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.E. Topics studied include the role of religion and myth in ancient Greece, politics and warfare, the status of women, the importance of athletics and other subjects pertaining to the ancient Greek World. Readings in translation include selected works of Hesiod, Homer, Pindar, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato and Plutarch.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
LLCU 330: World Literatures and Cultures: Literature and Society in Ancient Rome (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 278 Literature and Society in Ancient Rome
This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
LLCU 330: World Literatures and Cultures: Mystics, Saints, and Sinners: Studies in Medieval Catholic Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: RL 225
Through a close study of both primary and secondary materials in theology, spirituality, aesthetics, and social history, this course will introduce students to the major forms and institutions of religious thought and practice in medieval, Christian Europe (from Saint Augustine to the rise of humanism). The course will begin by studying the theological foundations of self and world in the work of Augustine and Pseudo-Dionysius, before turning to an elucidation of central religious institutions such as the papacy (and its relationship to imperial Rome), the monastery (we will study the rule of Saint Benedict and visit a Benedictine monastery), the cathedral (we will visit San Giovanni in Laterano and Saint Peter’s), and the university (and the scholastic philosophy to which it gave rise). We will then turn to alternative expressions of medieval religious faith in the work of several mystics, notably Meister Eckhart and Angela of Foligno. Finally we will study the reactions of the Church to the rise of science in the fifteenth century (we will look at the trial of Giordano Bruno) and will end with an appraisal of the continuity and renewal of Renaissance Humanism and its influence on the humanities as studied in a Liberal Arts Curriculum today.

--Partially on-site; activity fee: €10 or $15
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
MATH 115-070: Pre-Calculus (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 197: Pre-Calculus
This course provides an introduction to Calculus that focuses on functions and graphs. The properties of absolute value, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions will be studied, along with the techniques for solving equations and inequalities involving those functions.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: MATH010. Students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Only four credits from any combination of MATH113, MATH114, MATH115, MATH117, MATH127, MATH170 and MATH171 can count toward graduation.
MATH 221-074: Calculus I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 198: Calculus
This is a Standard Calculus course using an intuitive approach to the fundamental concepts in the calculus of one variable: limiting behaviors, difference quotients and the derivative, definite integrals, antiderivative and indefinite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: Requires two years of high school algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of precalculus, or MATH115, or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Credit cannot be received for both MATH221 and MATH241.
MSST 203: Introduction to Museums (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 271 Curating Museums and Galleries
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of museums and to curating practices. Classes will discuss the cultural position of the museum, the evolution of its function, the different forms of display, the historical developments of the act of collecting, the position of the visitor and the role of the curator. The primary purpose of the course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary for understanding how museums produce knowledge and structure the ways in which history, geography, cultural difference, and social hierarchies are mapped. Through a series of richly detailed case studies related to ancient and contemporary Rome museums, collections and institutions, classes will investigate the differences between the roles, the missions, the objectives, and the policies of conservation and exhibition-making in spaces, relating to modalities of thought. The course also intends to introduce the figure of the curator and its development from conservator and classifier to creative, critical protagonist of contemporary art culture. The course concludes with an overview of current debates around the contemporary need for museums, and large scale exhibition (such as Biennials and Triennials) and their perceived social functions
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
PHIL 102: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 240 Modern Philosophy
This course introduces you to modern philosophers’ revolutionary understandings of human beings’ place in the world. In a world challenged by new scientific discoveries and profound changes in society, these philosophers question their predecessors’ appeals to natural and supernatural order, and instead place the human mind, self, and society at the center of their philosophies. The radically different views about human knowledge and morality that they propose lead to rich debates over the senses and reason, matter and the mind, freedom and responsibility, and the self and community – all of which have profoundly influenced subsequent philosophy, and even society at large. To explore these views and debates, we will study the philosophies of crucial figures like Descartes, Hume, and Kant.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 102-072: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 101: Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
We all have opinions about what is true and false, right and wrong, what is just, divine, and beautiful, what the self, mind, and soul are, or what makes us free. But can we justify our opinions about such things? Have we given rational and open-minded consideration to criticisms and alternatives, or are our opinions perhaps based only on prejudices and assumptions? In this course you will learn to use philosophical thinking to test and improve your opinions and your ability to evaluate the claims of important philosophers. Through the study and discussion of philosophical texts, classic or contemporary, you will grapple with issues of fundamental human importance and develop your capacities for careful reading, clear writing and speaking, and logical argumentation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHYS 144: Concepts of the Universe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: NS 250 Astronomy
The course allows students to discover their place in the universe through the study of planets, stars, galaxies, and the cosmos. Knowledge of the universe and the laws governing its behavior take students on a journey of exploration and discovery from local neighboring planets in our solar system, beyond nearby stars and galaxies, out to the confines of the known observable universe.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PLSC 140: People and Plants: Feast or Famine (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: NS 220 Food and Agriculture
This is a survey course of agriculture, emphasizing the important food plants of the 21st century. The aim is to learn key processes which lead to the wide array of foods, which are available in developed countries. We start from the events of domestication, pass through the Green Revolution, and end with major plant crop commodities (such as bananas and coffee) being cultivated by “agribusiness” or also by “sustainable” farming methods. We also look at major issues related to agriculture today: for example, the development of biofuels which may use food stocks, and diseases and pests which threaten important monocultures. We look at the major achievements in agriculture of the 20th century, and try to anticipate the important uses and vulnerabilities of plant crops in the 21st century.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
POSC 150-070: Introduction to American Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 201: American Government
This course examines the main principles of American government – democracy, federalism and the separation of powers – and the legislative, executive and judicial institutions that simultaneously embody and challenge them. Special attention will be paid to such topics as state and local governments, political parties and elections, the role of the people, civil rights, the role of the media, American political culture and foreign policy.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 240-070: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 209: World Politics
An introduction to the theory and practice of international affairs, this course discusses the main schools of world politics as well as actors, structures and institutions of international relations. Through this framework the course explores key conflicts and issues in the post-World War II era, including problems of war, armed conflict, and peace, and the impact of recent trends in globalization on world politics.

--May be taken at the Honors level
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Required of all World Scholars in Rome
POSC 270-070: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 223: Comparative Politics
As both a subject and a method of study, comparative politics examines the nature, development, structure and functioning of the political systems of a selection of countries with very different cultures, social and economic profiles, political histories and geographic characteristics. Through case studies, students will learn to use the comparativist’s methods to collect and organize the information and develop general explanations.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 285-070: Introduction to Political Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 210 Introduction to Political Theory
An introduction to the history of political thought, from Ancient Greece to the 19th century. Through a close reading of selected canonical texts, students will examine the evolution of ideas about democracy, liberty, equality, justice, political authority, the social contract, different conceptions of human nature and the role of the individual in society. The theorists examined may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, de Tocqueville and John Stuart Mill.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 309-073: Political Culture by Country: Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 215: Italian Politics & Society
This course examines the evolution of Italian political culture from 1945 to the present. Highlighting the problems of developing a national identity and the legacies of Fascism and the Resistance in influencing the 1948 Constitution, the course will look at Italy’s position during the Cold War, the economic miracle of the 1950s, the political conflicts of the 1960s and 1970s, the end of the First Republic and the political scene since 1992, as well as the political influence of such actors as the Vatican and the Mafia. This course examines the major features of the political and social systems of the Italian Republic. Topics of analysis include the Constitution, the Italian economy, the role of the State, unions, the relationship between North and South, NATO, the U.S.-Italian partnership, and the European Union. Special attention will be given to the political developments leading to the establishment of the Second Republic
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Offered only in conjunction with travel abroad programs. May be taken twice for credit when countries vary.
PSYC 100-070: General Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 101: General Psychology
Introduces the study of psychology, the study of the human mind, in some of its many facets: epistemological issues, the brain, perception, learning, language, intelligence, motivation, development, personality, emotion, social influences, pathology and therapy, and prevention. These will be seen from the scientific and scholarly point of view, but with emphasis on their relevance to everyday life. An important focus of the course will be the significance of theories and how they influence the gathering of data, as well as the difficulty of objectivity when the object of study is also its primary tool: the human mind. One of the goals of the course will also be to prepare the student to read psychological literature with a critical eye, keeping in mind the difficulties involved in attempting to study human subjectivity in an objective way.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 303: Intro to Social Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 334 Social Psychology
The course focuses on the relationship between the individual and society, by examining how people form and sustain their attitudes, beliefs, and values. Students are introduced to current research findings in areas such as leadership and group dynamics, cults, prejudice and racism, aggression, altruism, and love and attraction. A group research project is required.
Prerequisite: Requires permission from JCU instructor
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 325: Child Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 321 Cognitive Development
This course aims to provide students with an understating of the developmental changes that occur in children’s thinking from birth to adolescence. Students will learn about current topics and theories in cognitive development as well as the experimental methodologies adopted in this field. Central topics will include brain development, perception, language, memory, category and concepts, social cognition, and problem solving.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 334: Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 335 Theories of Personality
Personality is generally defined as an individual’s unique stable pattern of thinking, feeling and behaving, and its study has been an extremely important focus in scientific psychology. This course examines the various theories of personality and, according to each theory, a personality’s structure and development. The scope of theories studied will be from the Freudian tradition through to Trait Theories, Biological Perspectives, Behavioral/Social Learning theories, Humanistic/Existential models and finally to more current Cognitive theories. Students will have opportunities to critically evaluate each theory/perspective, and in each of the theories address a variety of questions.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 340: Cognition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 307 Cognitive Psychology
This course will examine the structure and function of mental processes, which account for human behavior. Topics include attention, perception, memory, problem solving, decision making, cognitive development, language, and human intelligence. Individual, situational, gender, and cultural differences in cognition will also be explored. An individual research project or research paper is required.
Prerequisite: Requires permission from the JCU instructor
SOCI 204: Urban Communities (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/ITS 226 Rome: Modern City
This on-site course, which will be conducted in English, aims to introduce students to a sociological analysis of contemporary Rome. It focuses on the changes which are occurring in the city’s populations, its neighborhoods and patterns of daily life and commerce, and challenges conventional images of what it is to be a Roman today. On-site classes will be held in a variety of neighborhoods in the city in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. We will examine the issues and problems facing Rome today, such as housing, degradation and renewal, environmental questions, transportation, multiculturalism, wealth and poverty, social conflict and political identities. These issues will be contextualized within theories of urban sociology and also within an explanation of Rome’s urban development over the centuries and, in particular, since it became the national capital in 1870. Through readings, film clips, interviews and guest speakers, students will also analyze the way the city is narrated by some of its residents.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 367: Seminar: Sociology of Southern Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/ITS 225 Sociology of Southern Italy
This course will examine the Italian Mezzogiorno starting with this paradox – the reality of a society often engaged in rapid social change but one where change itself often appears impossible. We will look at the modern history of the region briefly, moving on to major themes and questions concerning how the Italian South has developed since the Unification of Italy and especially in recent decades. Issues to be studied include underdevelopment, modernization, social capital and civic spirit or the lack of it, the argument that the South is characterized by “amoral community”, the whys and hows of the great emigration of the last century, the land reforms after World War II, the attempt to overcome the region’s underdevelopment with the Fund for the Mezzogiorno, the issue of clientelist and corrupt politics, organized crime including the Sicilian Mafia, the Neapolitan Camorra, and the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta, the anti-Mafia movement, the current crisis of waste removal in Naples and its causes, the changing role of women in Southern society and others.
SPAN 105-070: Spanish I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 101: Introductory Spanish I
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Spanish. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.



Notes: SPAN 105, All sections are for students who have never studied Spanish or who have taken 2 years or less of Spanish in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: No Spanish background, two or fewer years of high school Spanish.
SPAN 106-070: Spanish II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 102: Introductory Spanish II
A continuation of SPAN101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Spanish I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: SPAN105
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Two to three years of high school Spanish acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
SPAN 107-070: Spanish III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 201: Intermediate Spanish I
A continuation of SPAN 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student’s ability to use Spanish effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with Spanish and Hispanic culture.
Prerequisite: SPAN 106 or SPAN 111 or equivalent courses or permission of instructor.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
THEA 226-070: Fundamentals of Acting I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DR 101: Introduction to Theatrical Performance
During this course students will learn to: collaborate creatively; employ basic acting techniques such as sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, status, etc.; develop an expressive speaking voice; engage with a variety of stage props; analyze the process of placing a dramatic text on stage; critique and enact a variety of theatrical techniques; define specific terms relating to the study of drama and theater; develop an appreciation for theater as an art form and a reflection of society; understand the responsibility of an actor’s work ethic, especially to one's fellow actors; initiate and upkeep a gradable class-by-class journal (either blog or v-log) of their personal growth throughout the course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
UNIV 373-019: Study Abroad - Rome World Scholars (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Restrictions: Restricted to UD World Scholar Admits
Requirements
World Scholars - Rome is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
Costs
Other important things to note:
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason.
Tuition charged to World Scholars is the same as that charged to other students at the University of Delaware. New rates are released every July.

The World Scholars Program Fee is a one-time fee that includes housing, dining, international insurance, select excursions and activities abroad, as well as resources to support your success provided by UD and our partner institutions. The program fee also serves as the foundation for the resources and opportunities that World Scholars will receive for the duration of their four-year participation in the UD World Scholars Program.

Scholars should reference the Financial Aid Award Notice, a packet received after admission, for their custom scholarship and need-based aid information. Note: Financial aid (federal, state and UD scholarships/grants, along with loans) is split evenly between the fall and spring semesters, with half of the overall award supporting program costs in the fall. Tuition payments must be made in accordance with the University of Delaware tuition and fee payment schedule.

To enroll as a Class of 2024 UD World Scholar, students must pay two enrollment deposits by May 1, 2020 -- $500 to confirm enrollment at UD and $500 to confirm enrollment in the World Scholars Program. Both deposit amounts are non-refundable and are deducted from the final University bill.

Other important things to note:
  • The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onMay 31, 2021
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $500.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Amy Greenwald Foley
Associate Director
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-3082
agfoley@udel.edu
Meghan Gladle
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE 19716
gladlem@udel.edu

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.