Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[100]
Fall 2021: World Scholars - Madrid, Spain
September 01, 2021 - December 11, 2021 (dates are tentative)
Applications will be accepted beginning Saturday, May 01 2021.
Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Palacio Real Madrid
Meetings
Program Notes
This program's deadline has been changed to 05/31/2021.
World Scholars - Madrid is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program.
Program Description

The University of Delaware World Scholars Program is a four-year program for internationalizing a student's undergraduate career. Choosing from a wide range of majors, World Scholars are supported in their studies with internationally-focused academics, experiences, and opportunities that will prepare them to live and work anywhere in the world.

Class of 2024 UD World Scholars will study abroad twice, including fall semester of their sophomore year in Greece, Italy, Spain or New Zealand, and in any of 40+ destinations during their junior year.

World Scholars in Madrid, Spain will experience their first semester as freshmen enrolled in UD courses at our partner institution, St. Louis University - Madrid (SLU-Madrid). Madrid, Spain’s capital, is an extraordinary city. One that features spectacular fountains, grand boulevards, and a maze of streets. A city that boasts the world’s finest art museums, most loyal fútbol fans, and late-night dinners. It’s a cultural crossroads—founded on the Moorish fortress that has become a modern-day, trend-setting melting pot, Spain’s political and economic engine.

And Saint Louis University’s Madrid Campus—SLU-Madrid—is an extraordinary place. As the international campus of Saint Louis University, you will be studying with students from over 60 different countries. SLU-Madrid students will expect you to learn about their cultures and ways of thinking. And they will learn from you.

UD World Scholars will live in a privately-run residence hall, "El Faro," located within a 10-minute walk of SLU-Madrid's campus. Scholars will reside on the same floor in double rooms, with other Scholars as roommates. A dining hall is located within El Faro, in which students will be able to enjoy breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Lunch may also be eaten, weekdays, on the campus of SLU-Madrid.

Students in this program will also benefit from the time and expertise of additional staff in Madrid who will serve as staff support to the students and as a liaison between the University of Delaware and faculty and staff at SLU-Madrid. This staff member will also gather students on a regular basis and will provide ongoing communication regarding planned excursions and special opportunities that take advantage of this incredible geographic location.

The Program Fee includes housing, medical insurance, some meals, airport transfers in Madrid, orientation week activities, numerous excursions throughout the fall, opening and closing celebrations, and full access to all SLU-Madrid facilities and activities.

It does not include the cost of a Spanish visa; students should budget approximately $200 for this.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Madrid. For planning purposes only, airfare is estimated at $1,400. For planning purposes only, airfare is estimated at $1,400. Students who wish to travel with the UD representative, must book the recommended flights.

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Before making the decision to study abroad, prospective students with disabilities should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some study abroad locations may differ from the United States. Review our Diversity Abroad information with family. You may also contact World Scholar Program leadership to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Honors credit may be available. Check with the faculty director and the Honors program for approval (check before departure).
All courses are taught in English and meet UD graduation requirements.

Scholars will enroll in POSC 240 Introduction to Global Politics and will select three or four additional courses.

Class of 2024 World Scholars will attend a workshop on 11/11/2020 about mapping their academic plan. World Scholars should should review their major course requirements and meet with their academic advisor(s) to determine which courses keep them on track with their academic plan. Additionally, Scholars should select as many alternate course options that could be taken and keep them on track towards graduation due to potential time conflicts or courses not being offered.

World Scholars who do not see a course listed below that they need to take in Fall 2021 should email Meghan (gladlem@udel.edu). The email should include:
--Course code (ex. SPAN 301)
--Reason why you need to take this course - what requirement does the course fill for you?
--Confirm if your advisor agrees that you need to take this course

Please note that the courses listed below have been reviewed by UD departments and approved as UD course equivalencies. This is a comprehensive list and not ALL of these courses may be offered in Fall of 2021. Course offerings are subject to change. A list of offered courses will be available in late spring. IGS will notify both students and their academic advisors.
ACCT 207: Accounting I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ACCT 2200 Financial Accounting
An introduction to financial reporting of results of operations, cash flow and financial position of corporate entities through general purpose financial statements. Emphasis is placed on the real-world environment of business and the use of financial accounting information for management decision making.
This course should not be taken by freshmen
ARAB 105-070: Introduction to Arabic (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 1010: Communicating in Arabic I
An introduction to the sounds and letters of Modern Standard Arabic (fusha) for beginners. Acquisition of basic communication skills and the elementary grammar structures and vocabulary of everyday situations.
ART 129-070: Design for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 2100: Design
The basic principles of composition and perception theories and how they apply to the fields of advertising, communication and graphic/industrial design. A presentation of forms and colors and their meanings, and a review of modern layouts and future trends towards a better understanding of the creative process.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 133-070: Drawing for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 2000: Drawing I
Introduction to black-and-white composition, with emphasis on the representation of three-dimensional reality on a two-dimensional surface. Analysis of line and mass as a means to explore objective and spatial concepts across media; composition and proportion of three-dimensional objects; free-hand sketching.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
ART 180-071: Photographic Approaches (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 2550: Photojournalism (Photographic Imaging and Digital Manipulation)
The world through a lens- retouched. An introductory non-darkroom photography course with emphasis on camera types and uses, films, lighting, exposures, composition and digital-image handling (Adobe Photoshop). An overview of the technical, aesthetic and professional aspects of photography and the new traditions brought about by digitalization. Students must possess a digital camera; specifications are posted online.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors and non-minors only.
ART 231-071: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 2200: Painting I
Introduction to the basic elements of painting: color, shape and spatial relationships; materials related to painting in oil and the development of traditional techniques. Study of impressionist theories of complementary colors, and practice in still-life, landscape and figure painting.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 150-070: Monuments & Methods in the History of Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 1010: History of Western Art
Presents a chronological survey of the major periods of art history (ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern) and introduces students to key concepts, terminology, analytical strategies, and critical questions relevant to understanding art.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199: Topics in Art History: Ancient Art Survey (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 2300 Ancient Art Survey
Study of the art and architecture of the great civilizations of antiquity, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy. Emphasis placed on understanding the cultural and historical context of this artistic production and its function in the ancient world.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199: Topics in Art History: Survey of Renaissance Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 2500: Renaissance Art Survey
An introduction to the art and architecture of the Renaissance, 1300-1600. Examination of works of art as products of the combined efforts of wealthy patrons, such as the Medici family and Pope Julius II, and the talents they patronized, such as Botticelli and Michelangelo. Works of art will also be examined from formal, theoretical and historical perspectives.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 239: Art & Architecture of Europe. Topic: Modern Art in Spain & France (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 3720: Modern Art in Spain and France
Concentrating on the work of artists in Spain and France, this course will cover some of the most important art movements in Western Art. Starting with romanticism (Goya) and ending with surrealism (Dali), and Arte Informal (Tapies), students will learn about modern art and the characteristics and significance of different periods and styles. Emphasis will be given to context, and the historical and artistic ties between Spain and France during the 19th and 20th Centuries. The course will also highlight issues related to modernity, modernism and the avant-gardes, as well as changes in the patronage and consumption of modern art.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239: Art & Architecture of Europe. Topic: The Golden Age of Spanish Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 3630: The Golden Age of Spanish Art
The art and architecture of Spain from its birth as a nation to its development into one of Europe's greatest empires. This course covers Spanish masters such as El Greco, Velazquez, and Murillo, and the architectural styles of the Renaissance and the Baroque.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239: Art & Architecture of Europe: Art & History of Madrid (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 2190: The Art and History of Madrid
First, the different historical periods and relevant events that influenced diverse artistic styles will be explained. Then, we will explore the most emblematic works of art from Madrid within their chronological context through slides, videos and museum visits throughout the course. Some visits will be led by the professor others while be made individually as part of the students' coursework.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239: Art and Architecture of Europe: History of Spanish Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 2180: History of Spanish Art
Spanish art from the Altamira cave paintings to the work of the great masters of modern art. Emphasis given to the most important artists and works of each period and style, including El Greco, Velazquez, Goya, Gaudi and Picasso. Supplementary visits to museums in Madrid.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 242: Woman as Image & Imagemaker (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 3010: Women in Art
This course considers the role of women, appearing as muses, patrons or creators in the history of art, and issues of gender as they relate to the politics of the visual arts. The study will cover a variety of periods and critical perspectives highlighting the work of artists such as Artemisia Gentileschi, Berthe Morisot, Frida Kahlo and Georgia O'Keefe.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
BISC 207-070: Introductory Biology I (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOL 1240/1245: General Biology + Lab
Introduction to fundamental principles of biology, with emphasis on the origin and definition of life; cells, their organization, chemical composition and metabolic activity; the basis of heredity; plant and animal phylogeny. Lab will cover experimental approaches used in molecular and cellular biology, genetics, and animal physiology. Students will learn to use scientific instruments and techniques implemented in these fields. Students will propose and test hypotheses, collect and analyze data, represent data visually, and practice written and oral scientific communication skills.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: CHEM103
BISC 267: Human Physiology (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PPY 2540: Human Physiology
How the body works. Study of the functioning of the human organism and its constituent cells and tissues. Review of the physical and chemical bases of physiology, and of cell structure and function. Focus on the preservation of the body's internal environment, and the protective mechanisms of the muscles, heart, kidney, liver, endocrine glands and the reproductive organs.
BISC 305: Cell Biology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOL 3040: Cell Structure and Function
Membrane structure/function, mitochondrial and chloroplast energy transduction and cellular thermodynamics, nuclear-cytoplasm information flow, protein sorting and modification in the ER and Golgi, the cytoskeletal framework, cell-cell signaling, cell cycle control, and the extracellular matrix and cell adhesion.
Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)
BUAD 384: Global Business Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IB 2000: Introduction to International Business
A broadly based introduction to the field of international business; consists of an inter-disciplinary survey of the fundamentals of (1) international trade; (2) environmental factors; (3) international institutions and agencies; and (4) company organization, managerial functions and operations around the world.
CHEM 103-100: General Chemistry (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 1110/1115: General Chemistry I + Lab
The science of substances: their composition, combination and change. Study of atomic theory, the structure of the atom, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, electronic structures of atoms, periodic properties of the elements, basic concepts of chemical bonding, Lewis symbols and the ionic bonding, molecular geometry and bonding theories, gases, solutions, intermolecular forces, liquids and solids, chemistry of the environment, and chemical kinetics. The lab course is aimed to complement the General Chemistry lecture course by introducing a number of practical experiments. Students will be exposed to aspects of basic chemical laboratory techniques and also some fundamentals of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: MATH-115
Students whose MATH Placement Examination score placed them in MATH-221 or higher need not take a MATH course coincident with CHEM-103. For majors in the physical and natural sciences, mathematics and engineering.
CHEM 104: General Chemistry (+Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 1120/1125 General Chemistry 2 (+Lab)
Continuation of CHEM 1110. Study of chemical equilibrium, Le Chartelier's principles, aqueous and acid-base equilibria, solutions, titration, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon; the nonmetallic elements, metals and metallurgy, chemistry of the transition elements, and coordination compounds.The lab course is aimed to complement the General Chemistry II lecture course by introducing a number of practical experiments.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
CHEM 321: Organic Chemistry I (+Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 2410/2415 Organic Chemistry 1 (+Lab)
The science of carbon. Modern organic chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Study of the structure and properties of organic molecules, and transition states; kinetics of reaction and reaction mechanisms: free radical substitution reactions of alkanes; stereochemistry, nucleophilic aliphatic substitution, and reactions of alcohols, ethers and epoxides; alkenes; electrophilic free radical, stereoelective and stereospecific reactions.This lab course is aimed to complement the Organic Chemistry 1 lecture course by introducing a number of practical experiments. Students will be exposed to important aspects in preparative organic chemistry, such as isolation and purification techniques and the set-up of chemical reactions.
CHEM 322: Organic Chemistry II (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 2420/2425 Organic Chemistry 2 (+ Lab)
Continuation of CHEM 2410. Study of alicyclic hydrocarbons; dienes, conjugation and resonance; alkynes; aromaticity, electrophilic aromatic substitution and aromatic-aliphatic compounds; neighboring group effects; aldehydes and ketones; enantiotopic and diastereotopic ligands and faces; carboxylic acids and their derivatives; carbanions; amines; phenols and aryl halides; conjugate and unsaturated compounds. The lab introduces a number of practical experiments on the most usual transformations carried out in any organic chemistry or biochemistry lab today. Students will deal with everyday life organic reactions and the experimental complications that come along with them.
CHIN 105: Chinese I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHIN 1010: Communicating in Chinese I
An introduction to Chinese. Emphasis on pronunciation and pinyin; introduction to the four tones and simplified characters. Vocabulary items and useful phrases for surviving simple daily life and travel in China.
COMM 245-071: Media and Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 2400/2500: Media & Society + Lab
We live in a swiftly changing media landscape that requires us to navigate a world of media options, engage in public policy disputes about the impact of media, and adapt to new modes of communicating with others. This 3 credit introductory course provides students with the background and critical skills necessary for understanding how media work and how they impact our everyday lives. By focusing on history, structure, and contemporary issues, the course seeks to give students critical media analytical skills necessary to succeed as professionals, citizens, and members of a global community.



The one-credit 'Media & Society Laboratory' immerses students in the technical and creative aspects of media production using the tools (hardware, software) of photography, video and audio, as well as implicating participatory media such as 'blogs'. Students apply the principles of each mode of production through the completion of a series of individual projects. Moreover, students are set up to explore their particular metacognitive technology practices (how do I learn to learn technology?) and for further practical/theoretical study in the Communication Department.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SLU-Madrid additional Lab Credit (SLU CMM 2500) for this course will NOT transfer to UD. Only 3 credits (SLU CMM will transfer.
COMM 263: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 1000: Human Communication and Culture
The burgeoning field of communication studies, focusing on essential theories and concepts. Emphasis both on interpersonal communication (language, small groups, non-verbal behavior); mass media, particularly popular culture (celebrities, new media); and political communication (media-State relations, elections).
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
COMM 350-071: Public Speaking (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 1200: Introduction to Public Speaking
Poise, polish and intensive practice in perhaps the most important professional skill there is. Extensive practice of the craft with guidance and regular feedback. Emphasis on techniques for structuring speeches, styles of presentation, and the use (and misuse) of argumentation and evidence.
If possible, Comm Interest majors should enroll in this course.
DANC 307-070: Ethnic Dance Styles: Latin Rhythms & Dance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DANC 2660: Latin Rhythms & Dance
An introduction to the movements and dance routines used in Cuban Salsa, Bachata, Cha-cha-cha and Argentinian Tango. Students will learn to recognize and perform each dance form in order to participate in the end-of-semester performance.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Course is taught in Spanish. Intermediate-level knowledge of Spanish is recommended.
DANC 307-071: Ethnic Dance Styles: Spanish Dance Flamenco (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DANC 2650: Spanish Dance: Flamenco
An introduction to the movements and dance routines used in the most basic Flamenco rhythms such as Rumba and Sevillanas. Students will learn to recognize and perform each dance form in order to participate in the end-of-semester performance.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Course is taught in Spanish. Intermediate-level knowledge of Spanish is recommended.
ECON 317-070: Latin American Economics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 3790: The Economies of Latin America and Iberia
Explores two major themes from the perspective of Latin America: the integration of national economies into the global economy and the role of the state in addressing market failure. Includes both theoretical and policy-oriented analyses.
May substitute for ECON 340 in IBS major
ENGL 214: Literature & Gender (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 2550: Gender, Identity and Literature
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Gender and Identity. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ENGL 217-071: Introduction to Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 1400: Introduction to Film Criticism
Commerce, high art and popular culture on the celluloid strip. An approach to film through an eclectic array of tools: formal analysis (mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing), theoretical constructs (auteurism, identification), and reading films as cultural expressions that betray social tensions of their time and place of production. Weekly screenings and analysis of films from a variety of time periods, genres and national cinemas.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 231: Studies in Environmental Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 2450: Nature, Ecology and Literature
How have writers struggled to reflect the complexity, beauty, and violence of the natural world? What particular insights upon the workings of ecology can literature offer? How does encountering nature through art differ from encountering nature through science? This course offers an introduction to the study of literature through the lens of writing about nature, ecology, and the environment. We will read broadly across historical periods and national traditions in order to discover how works of literature uniquely respond to the natural world. Possible texts include works by Sophocles, John Milton, the Gawain poet, Sir Walter Raleigh, William Shakespeare, Sir Edmund Spenser, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, William Wordsworth, William Carlos Williams and Stephen Crane.
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 2850: Nation, Identity and Literature
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of nation and identity. Through reading a wide variety of genres - including drama, fiction, and poetry - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative and reflective writing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 352: Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 3490: 19th Century British Lit
Nineteenth-century British literature explores the difference that historical context makes to the reading of texts, attending to chronological breadth of the nineteenth century. Historical contexts include literary history (the chronological succession of authors and of periods); periodization (the division of one period of literary history from another and the major characteristics of these periods); political, social, and cultural developments; and the changing ways in which texts are produced and received by readers and audiences.
ENGL 372: Studies in Drama: European Drama (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 3170: European Drama
This course takes you on a journey through European dramatic literature from ancient Greece to the 21st century, from Aristophanes through Shakespeare and Chekhov to Sarah Kane, against a backdrop of social, political, religious, cultural, and theatrical history. We will read and, when possible, view the plays, and bring them to life in class through close reading and discussion. There will be short response papers on each play and two longer critical papers.
ENGL 373: Studies in Poetry: War in Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 3400: War in Literature
A comparative study that focuses on European poetry of World Wars I and II, as well as some U.S. and Japanese writing. We will study how poetry expresses the individual and collective experience of war, memory, peace, and reconciliation, and how war shapes poetic innovation across the different political, cultural, and technological contexts of warfare during these wars. These influences include: "The Great War," with its trench, chemical, and aerial warfare; total war, fascism, the Holocaust, and nuclear warfare. Multidisciplinary readings from history of warfare, trauma studies, philosophy, feminism and gender studies, and literary and political theory provide different theoretical views to enhance understanding of the nature of war and its social and psychological impact.
ENSC 101-070: Introduction to the Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EAS 1080: Introduction to Environmental Science
A review of the elementary biology, chemistry and meteorology behind natural and man-made phenomena that change (or destroy) ecosystems. The crude costs and benefits to society of using or protecting natural resources. Focus on the Spanish and European experience.
Includes a manadatory day-trip to Peñalara National Park, Sierra de Guadarrama. Students may incur an additional cost for this trip.
FREN 105-071: French I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FREN 1010: Communicating in French I + Lab
Acquisition of basic communication skills through extensive study of French grammar and vocabulary, and practice in a variety of everyday situations. Emphasis on listening comprehension, reading strategies, and oral and written expression.



Notes: FREN 105, All sections are for students who have never studied French or who have taken 2 years or less of French in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
FREN 106: Elementary French II (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FREN 1020: Communicating in French II
Continuation of FREN 1010. Consolidation of essential grammar: use of past and future tenses, and hypothetical conditions; further development of listening and reading strategies; and extensive practice of verbal and writing skills.
GEOG 101-070: Physical Geography - Climatic Processes (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EAS 1030: Earth's Dynamic Environment II
Survey of basic meteorological concepts: composition of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; radiation and energy balances; effects of ocean currents on weather patterns; atmospheric optics, cloud and precipitation processes, local and global wind circulations; forecasting and severe weather phenomena.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
HDFS 201: Life Span Development (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: NURS 1430: Human Growth and Development through the Lifespan
Physical, mental, emotional, social, moral and spiritual characteristics and adaptive mechanisms. Concepts of death in the child, adolescent and adult. Family development tasks and family interaction, as they influence the individual throughout the life span.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
HIST 103-071: World History to 1400 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 1110: Origins of the Modern World to 1500
Developmental approach to the Western World as a confluence of classical, Islamic and Judeo-Christian traditions. Study of the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean and Near East (Greece, Rome and Byzantium); the Asian, Norman and Islamic invasions of Europe; the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Reformation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
HIST 104-070: World History since 1400 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 1120: Origins of the Modern World 1500 to the Present
Developmental approach to five hundred years of history, with emphasis on increasing European awareness of the rest of the world: the forming of the modern state, the first transatlantic encounters, Catholic and Protestant Reformations, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Ottoman Empire, encounters with Africa and Asia, Marxism, World Wars I and II, and contemporary society.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
HIST 135-070: Introduction to Latin American History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3170: Colonial Latin America
From Montezuma to Bolivar. A history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the Wars of Independence. Focus on major indigenous societies, the processes of conquest and colonization, the relationship with Europe in the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the colonial legacy.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
HIST 339: Topics in European History: History of the Jews in Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3770: History of the Jews in Spain
The Sephardic experience. The impact of an enormously versatile and dynamic minority group on Spanish culture, from early times to the present. Focus on Jewish philosophical and cultural contributions to Spanish and European society. Themes include the Jews in Muslim al-Andalus, Jewish mysticism and the Kabbalah, the Spanish Inquisition and the Jewish expulsion of 1492, and conversos (New Christians) and their dominance of the commercial and intellectual life of early-modern Spain.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Medieval Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3760: Medieval Spain
Study of 800 years of Jewish, Moorish and Christian occupancy in Spain. Focus on the way each of these civilizations contributed to the social, cultural and political formation of Spanish society, and analysis of the events which brought this era to an end.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 339: Topics in European History: The Spanish Civil War (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3340: The Spanish Civil War
No pasaran! The history of Spain as seen through its most important upheaval in modern times. The Spanish Civil War as a focal point to concentrate on the various themes, trends and issues of modern Spanish history. Analysis of the war as a turning point in modern history. Course requires a mandatory academic day-trip to El Escorial and the Valley of the Fallen.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 348: History of Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3320: Early Modern History of Spain: 1469-1818
Expansion and decline of an empire: a history of Spain from the reign of Ferdinand and Isabel to the Napoleonic invasion. Analysis of the unification and the colonization of America, from its sixteenth-century heyday through eighteenth-century decadence. Focus on political, socio-economic, religious and cultural perspectives.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
students may use ONLY ONE of HIST 3330 OR HIST 3320 for UD's HIST 348
HIST 384: History of Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3330: Modern History of Spain: 1808 to the Present
The altibajos of Spanish modernity. History of Spain from the French invasion to the present. Analysis of the nineteenth-century revolution, the First and Second Republics, the civil war, the Franco era and the democratic period from Adolfo Suarez to Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HLPR 233-070: Introduction to Global Health (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PUBH 2100: Introduction to Global Health
How health promotion and disease prevention occurs around the world. Particular attention paid to how disease burden, culture, and resource levels require changing approaches to public health interventions. An introduction to the way health and its many social determinants are promoted in different contexts around the world. Special attention to those areas of the world that bear the greatest burden of disease, with particular attention to the health situation of low- and middle-income countries.

Cross listed with UAPP 233.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
LATN 101-071: Elementary Latin I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LATN 1010: Reading Latin I
Introduction to the language of the Roman Empire. Focus on vocabulary, morphology, syntax and practice in reading Latin.
LATN 102-070: Elementary Latin II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LATN 1020: Reading Latin II
Continued study of Latin. New material includes the regular verbs, some irregular verbs, the fifth declension, the comparison of adjectives, the formation and comparison of adverbs, numerals, construction of time and place, subordinate clauses and uses of the subjunctive.
Prerequisite: LATIN 101 or one year of high school Latin acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
MAST 200-070: The Oceans (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EAS 1050: Introduction to Oceanography
Chemical and physical properties of sea water, waves, currents, tidal forces and tides, interaction of land and ocean in coastal environments, marine biology and ocean resources. Course requires a mandatory academic trip to the Mediterranean coast of Spain.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Open only to non-science majors or with permission from instructor or advisor.
Course requires a mandatory academic trip to the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Additional cost of approximately $350 assessed to student.
MATH 117: Pre-Calculus for Scientists and Engineers (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 1400: Pre-Calculus
An introduction to the concepts required for subsequent Calculus series. All about functions and their applications with algebra in modeling the real world. In particular, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and models.
If students need MATH115 for their major or as a prerequisite for taking MATH221, the MATH117 transfer would satisfy that requirement. SLU Math Dept. Chair explains that this course is for students who will continue taking higher level math courses with a focus on engineering. It is not recommended that business students take this course.
MATH 210: Discrete Mathematics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 1660: Discrete Mathematics
Sets, sequences, strings, symbolic logic, proofs, mathematical induction, sums and products, number systems, algorithms, complexity, graph theory and finite state machines.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
MATH 221-075: Calculus I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 1320: Survey of Calculus
Introductory differential and integral calculus, optimization and rate problems, calculus of rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, partial derivatives and applications.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Credit cannot be received for both MATH221 and MATH241.
SLU Math Dept. Chair explains that this course is geared towards business students due to examples used in the course.
MATH 302: Ordinary Differential Equations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 3550: Differential Equations I
Solution of ordinary differential equations, higher order linear equations, constant coefficient equations, systems of first order equations, linear systems, equilibrium of nonlinear systems, Laplace transformations.
MUSC 101-070: Appreciation of Music (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MUSC 1000: Approaching the Arts: Music
An introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the basic elements, genres and styles (classical and popular) of Western music. Incorporated into the syllabus are live concerts performed at venues around Madrid.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
MUSC 105-070: Music & Piano Fundamentals (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MUSC 1100: Music & Piano Fundementals
An introductory course in music notation, sight reading, ear training and the basic forms of western music. Students enrolled in this class will strengthen their performing and reading ability through basic musicianship exercises such as rhythmic duets, rounds and easy four part singing. Along with this practical side, the course will provide the minimum necessary background in music theory that every literate musician should possess. At the end of the class students will be able to build and recognize chords, identify the different forms of western music, and use musical terms and symbols.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 102-071: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 1050: Introduction to Philosophy: Self & Reality
Western philosophy, mathematics and science as they emerged in ancient Greece. Preliminary treatment of seminal work of the Presocratics and Socrates; primary focus on the writings of Plato and Aristotle. Analysis of the Greek contributions to logical, metaphysical and ethical thought.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 201: Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 4350: Survey of Social and Political Philosophy
A survey of selected works by major figures in the history of modern social and political philosophy. Readings are likely to include selections from Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, and Mikhail Bakunin, among others.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 203: Ethics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 2050: Ethics
An introduction to ethical theory and its application to cases. Whether ethical decisions can be rational; the debate between utilitarians and deontologists; egoism and altruism; different levels of moral discourse.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHYS 144-070: Concepts of the Universe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYS 1130: Introduction to Astronomy (+ Optional 1 credit Lab)
This course is a basic introduction to Astronomy for non-science majors. It does not apply toward the area of concentration with a major in Physics. The course enables the students to acquire a broad knowledge about the Solar System and the Universe. The course is straightforwardly descriptive and without complex mathematics; however, knowledge of basic algebra is assumed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Mandatory excursion to the Teide Observatory in Tenerife. Additional cost of approximately $350 assessed to student. Students may add optional 1-credit lab. Not for credit for students who have taken PHYS 133.
PHYS 201: Introductory Physics I (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYS 1310/1320: Physics I (+ Lab)
The science of energy and matter. Analysis of kinematics: straight line motion, circular and projectile motion. Introduction to Newtonian dynamics: Newton's laws and their application. Study of the work energy theorem and conservation of mechanical energy, and introductory thermodynamics and fluids.


Prerequisite: MATH115 or MATH117 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH221 or MATH 241 (Calculus).
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Requires a strong mathematics background in geometry, algebra and trigonometry. Only one course among PHYS201, PHYS207 and SCEN101 can count toward graduation.
Students must enroll in the one-credit lab to accompany this course.
PHYS 202: Introductory Physics II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYS 1330/1340: Physics II (+ Optional 1 credit Lab)
Continuation of PHYS 1310. Study of electrostatics, electric field and Coulomb's law; electric current, currents, resistance and Kirchoff's laws; magnetism, induced electromotive force; alternative currents; applications of waves; optics. Focus on modern physics: relativity, quantum physics, particles and cosmology. Laboratory in electricity, magnetism, and optics.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
This course was approved for 3 credits. 1 credit lab does not transfer back to UD
PORT 216-071: Intensive Beginning Portuguese I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PG 1010: Communicating in Portuguese I
Acquisition of basic communication skills through extensive study of Portuguese grammar and vocabulary, and practice in a variety of everyday situations. Emphasis on listening comprehension, reading strategies, and oral and written expression.
PORT 316: Intensive Beginning Portuguese, II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PG 1020: Communicating in Portuguese II
Continuation of PG 1010. Consolidation of essential grammar: use of past and future tenses, and hypothetical conditions; further development of listening and reading strategies; and extensive practice of verbal and writing skills.
Prerequisite: PORT 216 or equivalent.
Restrictions: Not open to native speakers of Portuguese.
POSC 166-070: Special Topics: Intro to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 1500: Introduction to Comparative Politics
Analysis and comparison of governmental institutions and procedures in liberal-democratic, communist and post-communist states. Examination of the impact of modernization, democratization and revolution on political processes.
POSC 240-072: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2930: Special Topic: Global Politics
This course analyzes the international dimensions of politics. It is divided into three parts. The first part offers a broad introduction to international relations theory. The process of globalization has altered our understanding of politics and the nature of international political interaction. While the traditional view of politics was state-centric, recent international developments have changed this perspective, adding new global actors. Students will investigate these changes, looking at different theoretical approaches. The second part of the course provides an historical approach. The starting point is the Cold War. Students will become familiar with the Cold War as an international system and its consequences. The end of the Cold war opened up a new period which was marked by inter alia humanitarian interventions and the promotion of democracy. The third part of the course explores institutional settings and domestic political conditions that help us to understand the emergence of different type of global leaders. It explores these dynamics against the backdrop of the post 2008 economic crisis. The course also offers an opportunity to debate the current global crisis of political leadership.



This course can be taken at the Honors level
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Required of all World Scholars in Madrid.
POSC 270: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 1600: Introduction to International Politics
Tension and contention in world politics: international conflict and its resolution. Theoretical and applied examination of the interaction between states, transnational organizations and international institutions. Study of the international system and the modern state; East-West, North-South conflicts and nuclear weapons; the Cold War and its aftermath. Emphasis on the European perspective.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 300: Research Methods for Political Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2000: Methods in Political Science
An introduction to research methods of political science. Topics include the behaviorist-traditionalist dichotomy; the nature of science; the application of scientific methods; the quantification of political phenomena; the function of theory and theory building; and surveys and computers.
POSC 309-075: Political Culture by Country (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 1000: Introduction to Political Science
Introductory study of the political process, the state, sovereignty, nationalism, functions of government, ideologies, political systems, forms of government, democratic and totalitarian models, federal and unitary models, constitutionalism, representation, political parties and interest groups. Particular attention given to political models at work in contemporary Europe.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
POSC 316: International Political Economy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2600: Introduction to International Political Economy
This course is an introduction to the field of International Political Economy. It explores the interaction of economics and politics in global affairs - the struggle for power and wealth within the international system. The main theme of the class is that neither international politics nor international economics can be understood in isolation. The course examines contending IPE approaches, and evaluates them in terms of their relevance in interpreting past and contemporary issues in international political economy, with special emphasis placed on the political and economic dimensions of the post-war international monetary, financial, and trading systems. The course will also contain a healthy dose of study and analysis of both the causes and effects of the current, post-2008 economic and financial crisis. Other topics include globalization, liberal democracy and economic decision-making, multinationals, international development, the New Green Deal, and regional economic organizations. The course aims at helping students to gain a better understanding of the interplay of the political and economic factors that ultimately determine the makeup of our 21st-century International Political Economy.
POSC 330: Political Terrorism (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2640: International Terrorism
Definitions and analyses of terror's complex causes and motivations-religious, political, economic and ideological. Consideration of both historical and theoretical perspectives; treatment of the problems that arise in defining terrorist organizations; analysis of the political economy of terrorist movements; and assessment of institutional responses to terrorist threats. Case studies used to illustrate and clarify the issues surrounding terrorist activity.
POSC 409: Topics in World Politics: Political Development in Contemporary Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 3567: Political Development in Contemporary Spain
Study of historical factors in the political development of Spain and their consequences in contemporary politics. Focus on the Second Republic, the Spanish Civil War, Franco, the Church and religion, the establishment of the new middle classes, the reign of King Juan Carlos I, the Spanish Armed Forces and the emergence of democratic Spain.
POSC 426: Latin American Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2570: Introduction to Latin American Politics
Democratization in Latin America is an ongoing process. More than thirty years on from the 1980s wave of democratization the region presents significant variations in its political trends. Political events such as those in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Argentina or Peru demonstrate that transition to democracy is risky and that democratic consolidation is far from being achieved. Rather than bringing more certainty or stability to the political arena, democratization has engendered new forms of organization by state institutions and civil society and new sources of antagonism and unrest. However, there seem to be few exceptions to the rule that democracy is the only game in town. This course analyses the challenges confronting democracy in the region.
POSC 439: Topics in African Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2550: Political Systems of the Sub-Sahara
This course will introduce students to the history and contemporary politics of sub-Sahara Africa. Starting with a historical overview, the course will take the students through pre-colonial Africa, the era of colonization, and the different roads of sub-Sahara African countries towards independence. The second part of the course will focus on contemporary Africa, with a special focus on development, conflict, and governance. By the end of the course, successful students will be able to explain the contemporary political and economical situation of sub-Sahara Africa's most important countries and regions.
May be crosslisted with UD's AFRA 439.
PSYC 100-071: General Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 1010: General Psychology
Introduction to modern psychology through lectures and practical work. Brief review of the history of psychology and of psychological research methods. Focus on biopsychology and neuroscience; sensation, perception; learning; psychology of action, cognition, motivation, emotion, social behavior, developmental and individual differences.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 207: Research Methods (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 2050: Foundations of Research Methods and Statistics
Fosters understanding of psychology as a science. Integrates introduction to basic designs, hypothesis generation, ethics, and writing conventions with computation of descriptive statistics and conceptual overview of inferential techniques. Preparation for: reading empirical articles, applied and advanced courses, working on faculty research, senior inquiry research projects. Team exercises in lab.
Students must enroll in both lecture and lab.
PSYC 334: Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 4390
A survey of mental disorders, their signs, symptoms, underlying causes and treatment, with emphasis on the analysis of signs and symptoms.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
This equivalency is for the non-major’s version of the course which does NOT count toward the major or minor. MUST take General Psych FIRST.
PSYC 340: Cognition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 3120: Cognitive Psychology
Discussion of higher-order cognitive processes, including memory functioning, reasoning, thinking, problem-solving, language production and comprehension.
PSYC 350: Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 3210: Developmental Psychology: Child
Survey of the facts and fictions of child development, as an introduction to the theories, research methods, and empirical findings that make up the field of Developmental Psychology. Emphasis on normative psychological development from conception to puberty, including aspects of cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional and personality development.
PSYC 370: Research in Personality (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 3310: Personality Theory
A survey of the major theories of psychology as they relate to human personality. Emphasis on historical and modern perspectives of personality development and the scientific study of personality psychology.
SPAN 105-071: Spanish I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 1010: Communicating in Spanish I
Emphasis on listening comprehension, reading strategies, and oral and written expression. Development of a solid grammatical base through study of verb conjugations, simple tenses, reflexive verbs and basic linguistic constructions.



Notes: SPAN 105, All sections are for students who have never studied Spanish or who have taken 2 years or less of Spanish in high school. Any questions contact Crista Johnson cristaj@udel.edu, Language Placement at 320 Jastak Burgess Hall .
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: No Spanish background, two or fewer years of high school Spanish.
SPAN 107-071: Spanish III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 1020: Communicating in Spanish II
Continuation of SPAN 1010. Further development of language skills essential for social and academic life in Spain. Consolidation of past and future tenses, introduction to subjunctive tenses and use of pronouns, prepositions and conjugations.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: SPAN105
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Two to three years of high school Spanish acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
SPAN 200-071: Spanish Composition & Grammar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 2010: Intermediate Spanish: Language & Culture
Development of language skills in the context of current issues in Spanish society and culture. Study of simple and compound indicative tenses; emphasis on present subjunctive conjugation and command forms; intensive review of all verb tenses and basic grammatical structures.
Prerequisite: SPAN 106 or SPAN 111 or equivalent courses or permission of instructor.
SPAN 206-071: Spanish Culture through Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 3020: Oral Communication (conversaciones y paseos por Madrid)
Focus on strategies for achieving greater understanding, accuracy and fluency in the language of modern-day Spain.
Prerequisite: SPAN107 or SPAN112
Restrictions: Taught abroad only. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN205 and SPAN206.
SPAN 300: Advanced Spanish Composition and Grammar I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 4000: Advanced Spanish Grammar
Review of advanced grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions and syntax to develop awareness of appropriate language use.
SPAN 306: Practical Oral/Written Expression (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 3040: In Conversation with the Hispanic World
Intensive practice of both formal and colloquial spoken Spanish, with particular attention to social, political, economic and cultural issues. Speaking skills developed through oral presentations, commentary and discussion, based on texts from diverse media sources.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200.
Restrictions: Taught abroad only.Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 305 and SPAN306.
SPAN 308-071: Contemporary Spain II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 2930: Special Topics - Introduction to Spanish Culture and Civilization
This is a communicative class intended for achieving a better understanding of the Spanish culture. It is designed to improve vocabulary and fluency through the discussion on several aspects of Spain and Latin America such as popular music, food, travel, art, politics, history, cinema or the media.
Prerequisite: Any two 200-level Spanish courses taught in the Spanish language.
Restrictions: Taught abroad and in Spanish.
SPAN 355-073: Special Topics: Intro to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 4200: Introduction to Hispanic Literature
Study of basic literary concepts and methods of textual analysis. Introduction to different literary genres and their historical development. Readings from a selection of outstanding canonical works from both peninsular and Latin American literature.
Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Course is taught in Spanish. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
SPAN 462: Topics: Hispanic Short Fiction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 4240: Contemporary Latin American Short Story
Short story trends, themes and techniques. Selections from outstanding authors with emphasis on Borges, Cortázar and García Márquez.
THEA 226: Fundamentals of Acting I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: THR 2510: Acting I: Fundamentals
The exhilarating challenge of the stage. The instruments-voice and body-and the basic tools: observation, memory, imagination, sensory awareness and repetition. Overcoming inhibitions and acquiring the focus and discipline necessary for performance.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
UNIV 373-025: Study Abroad - Madrid, Spain (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Restrictions: Restricted to UD World Scholar Admits
WOMS 201: Introduction to Women & Gender Studies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: WGST 1900: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to feminist thought and Women's and Gender Studies scholarship. The course material and discussions will focus on the different institutions of Western society such as families, schools, workplaces, and the media, and the way they construct and view gender differences. The course emphasizes how communication creates and reflects gender in society. We will consider how sexism, racism, classism, and global capitalism limit and shape the lives and contributions of the denizens of the 21st century.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Requirements
World Scholars-Madrid is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
Costs
Other important things to note:
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason.
Tuition charged to World Scholars is the same as that charged to other students at the University of Delaware. New rates are released every July.

The World Scholars Program Fee is a one-time fee that includes housing, dining, international insurance, select excursions and activities abroad, as well as resources to support your success provided by UD and our partner institutions. The program fee also serves as the foundation for the resources and opportunities that World Scholars will receive for the duration of their four-year participation in the UD World Scholars Program.

Scholars should reference the Financial Aid Award Notice, a packet received after admission, for their custom scholarship and need-based aid information. Note: Financial aid (federal, state and UD scholarships/grants, along with loans) is split evenly between the fall and spring semesters, with half of the overall award supporting program costs in the fall. Tuition payments must be made in accordance with the University of Delaware tuition and fee payment schedule.

To enroll as a Class of 2024 UD World Scholar, students must pay two enrollment deposits by May 1, 2020 -- $500 to confirm enrollment at UD and $500 to confirm enrollment in the World Scholars Program. Both deposit amounts are non-refundable and are deducted from the final University bill.

Other important things to note:
  • The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onMay 31, 2021
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $500.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Amy Greenwald Foley
Associate Director
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
agfoley@udel.edu
Meghan Gladle
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-6441
gladlem@udel.edu

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.