Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[103]
Spring 2022: Madrid, Spain
January 11, 2022 - May 12, 2022
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

View of Madrid from SLU-Madrid by Emma Straw
Meetings
Interest Meetings:
04/22/2021 7:00 PM - 8:00 PMZoom Link: https://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0ucemhqDsvEtHoTCDuzMonYjeffKZWQtd6
04/27/2021 7:00 PM - 8:00 PMZoom Link: https://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMtd-yorjIoH9DmSgSkIv9yFrrmoqKlx5zR
09/08/2021 11:00 AM - 12:00 PMZoom Link: https://slu.zoom.us/j/97532794320
09/09/2021 4:00 PM - 5:00 PMZoom Link: https://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwvduypqjwtGNJnGKkR-Htx5Ps28Ft4IF94
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
10/14/2021 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM127 Memorial Hall
12/02/2021 7:00 PM - 8:00 PMTBD
Program Notes
If you do not have a current passport, you should be aware that COVID-19 has delayed passport processing times significantly. The U.S. State Department has announced that it now takes an average of 18 weeks (4.5 months) to process a passport.

Given the circumstances, if you want to study abroad in 2022, you need to apply for or renew your passport NOW - even if you’re not 100% sure about your study abroad plans yet. We recommend expediting both the processing time and the shipping time for your passport.


Traveling and studying abroad during a global pandemic poses new challenges and requires accepting a higher level of uncertainty than in the past. Students who choose to study abroad at this time must be prepared to adapt to the evolving situation and must take responsibility to act in accordance with the rules, regulations, and recommendations of UD, their program leadership, and legal authorities of their home and host country. Due to the rapidly changing and unpredictable global and local response to COVID-19, these rules, regulations and recommendations are subject to change at any time.

The University will continue to monitor the ongoing situation with COVID-19 (coronavirus) as we approach the departure date for this program. Please reach out to your program coordinator or faculty director with questions and continue to monitor the UD coronavirus webpage for updates.

If UD decides to cancel a study abroad program, we will communicate directly with affected students. In this case, the University of Delaware will reimburse the cost of program fees, tuition and flights (if purchase was advised by CGPS).
Program Description

All applicants must have a valid passport by program's deadline.

Study at Saint Louis University’s Madrid Campus which was the first non-Spanish University to be officially recognized by Madrid’s higher education authority. At this small university with a wide range of courses, students will have the benefit of small classes taught in English while studying in the center of Spain.

As the international campus of Saint Louis University, you will be studying with students from over 60 different countries. Average class size is 16 and the student to faculty ratio is 11:1.

Madrid, the capital of Spain, is a one of a kind place, featuring spectacular fountains, grand boulevards, and a maze of streets. Madrid is a bustling and vibrant city that boasts the world’s finest art museums, most loyal fútbol fans, and late-night dinners.

Study abroad students also have access to the university’s resources which include a library, English Writing Center, a Spanish Language Center and Math Tutors.

Students will live in double rooms in a privately run residence hall with Spanish students located about a 10-15 minute walk to SLU-Madrid's campus. The residence has a dining hall in which students can enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner. Lunch may also be eaten, weekdays, on the campus of SLU-Madrid.

Community Engagement: Students have the opportunity to volunteer in the local community, the best way to get to know the Spanish.

The Program Fee includes housing, Spanish visa, meals at residence hall and international medical insurance. Students will need to budget for laundry, cellphone, bed linens, books and other personal expenses. Students are required to have a cellphone capable of making local calls in Spain and of sending and receiving text messages in Spain.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare to/from Madrid, nor does it include airport transfers in the United States. The program officially begins when students arrive in Madrid. Students will receive detailed travel instructions after acceptance, explaining how and where to purchase their plane ticket. See the Cost section below for estimate airfare. For this program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together.

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcomed and encouraged to study abroad, but should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
Please note: All courses are taught in English with the exception of SPAN courses.

Courses offered are subject to change as the host institution's scheduling may change.

Students take a maximum of 18 credits on the program.
ACCT 207: Accounting I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ACCT 2200 Financial Accounting
An introduction to financial accounting. Topics: the accounting cycle, merchandise accounting, accounting procedures for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant and equipment, stocks and bonds.
Restrictions: Not open to freshmen.
ARAB 105: Arabic I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 1010: Communicating in Arabic I
Introduction to the Arabic language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
ART 129: Design for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 2100 Design
Introduction to art and design principles within creative problem solving assignments using 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional media. Design organization criteria, technical craftsmanship, and artistic objectives interconnect to support production of original expressive statements.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors.
ART 133: Drawing for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 2000: Drawing I
Projects involving black-and-white and color studies in a variety of media, including charcoal, pencil, ink, and pastels.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Restrictions: Open to non-majors.
ART 180: Digital Photography for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 2550: Photojournalism
Introduces the basics of photography as a way to communicate ideas emphasizing content, composition, and technique. Examines contemporary artists and historic movements through research, gallery visits and lectures. Using a digital camera and visual editing software students create, edit and critique images.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors
ART 231: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ART 2200: Painting I
An exploration of beginning oil painting methods and material through both traditional and conceptual painting ideas, providing the student with a foundation for discovering their unique potential for self-expression.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 239: Art & Architecture of Europe: Golden Age of Spanish Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 3630: Golden Age of Spanish Art
Primary focus on painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe from the Romanesque to the Modern eras. Subject matter determined by country in which overseas program is conducted.

The art and architecture of Spain from its birth as a nation to its development into one of Europe's greatest empires. This course covers Spanish masters such as El Greco, Velazquez, and Murillo, and the architectural styles of the Renaissance and the Baroque.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239: Art and Architecture of Europe: Modern Art in Spain & France (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTH 3720: Modern Art in Spain and France
Primary focus on painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe from the Romanesque to the Modern eras. Subject matter determined by country in which overseas program is conducted.

Concentrating on the work of artists in Spain and France, this course will cover some of the most important art movements in Western Art. Starting with romanticism (Goya) and ending with surrealism (Dali), and Arte Informal (Tapies), students will learn about modern art and the characteristics and significance of different periods and styles. Emphasis will be given to context, and the historical and artistic ties between Spain and France during the 19th and 20th Centuries. The course will also highlight issues related to modernity, modernism and the avant-gardes, as well as changes in the patronage and consumption of modern art.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Offered only in conjunction with a study abroad program. May be repeated for credit three times when topics vary.
BISC 207: Introductory Biology I (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOL 1240 General Biology: Information Flow and Evolution & BIOL 1245 Principles of Biology I Laboratory
Molecular basis of life. Structure and function of cells, including signal transduction pathways. Energy transformations. Classical Mendelian genetics and the flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins. Laboratory focuses on the testing of hypotheses, data analysis and scientific writing.

Introduction to fundamental principles of biology, with emphasis on the origin and definition of life; cells, their organization, chemical composition and metabolic activity; the basis of heredity; plant and animal phylogeny. Lab will cover experimental approaches used in molecular and cellular biology, genetics, and animal physiology. Students will learn to use scientific instruments and techniques implemented in these fields. Students will propose and test hypotheses, collect and analyze data, represent data visually, and practice written and oral scientific communication skills.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: CHEM 103 and CHEM 133 or CHEM 107 or CHEM 111. Students who received credit in BISC205 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
BISC 208: Introductory Biology II (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOL1260 General Biology: Transformations of Energy and Matter & BIOL 1265 Principles of Biology II Laboratory
Mechanisms of evolution. Physiology of multicellular plants and animals. Principles of ecology with emphasis on the biology of populations. Laboratory focuses on testing of hypotheses, data analysis and scientific writing. Animal and plant anatomy also studied.
Prerequisite: BISC 207 or BISC 205.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: CHEM 104 and CHEM 134, or CHEM 108 or CHEM 112.
BISC 305: Cell Biology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOL 3040: Cell Structure and Function
The structure and function of eucaryotic cell organelles. Emphasis on dynamic processes such as membrane transport, cell motility and protein trafficking. Current studies from the literature and experimental techniques are also stressed.

Membrane structure/function, mitochondrial and chloroplast energy transduction and cellular thermodynamics, nuclear-cytoplasm information flow, protein sorting and modification in the ER and Golgi, the cytoskeletal framework, cell-cell signaling, cell cycle control, and the extracellular matrix and cell adhesion.
Prerequisite: BISC 208, and CHEM 104 and CHEM 134, or CHEM 108.
BUAD 306: Introduction to Service and Operations Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: OPM 3050 Introduction to Management Sciences and Operations Management
Analysis of major problems faced by operations managers at different levels ofmanagement. Topics include scheduling, forecasting, process design, inventorymanagement and quality management.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: MATH 201 or STAT200.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: COE Professional & Career Preparation Requirement
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 309: Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 3000 Management Theory & Practice
Examines individual, group, and organizational determinants of work behavior in organizations. Theory and concepts relevant to individual differences, attitudes, motivation, teams, leadership, power, and organizational culture and change are discussed with an emphasis on applying this knowledge to the challenges of management in a variety of organizations.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
Open ONLY to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.
BUAD 384: Global Business Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IB 2000: Introduction to International Business
Evaluation of the elements of the national, international, and global environments that influence the context and conduct of international business. Emphasizes aspects of the cultural, political, economic, legal-regulatory, trade, financial, and institutional environments.

A broadly based introduction to the field of international business; consists of an inter-disciplinary survey of the fundamentals of (1) international trade; (2) environmental factors; (3) international institutions and agencies; and (4) company organization, managerial functions and operations around the world.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
CHEM 103: General Chemistry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 1110 General Chemistry I
Matter, the changes that matter undergoes, and the laws governing these changes, with greater emphasis on atomic and molecular structure, chemicalbonding, and energy relationships. Properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions.

The science of substances: their composition, combination and change. Study of atomic theory, the structure of the atom, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, electronic structures of atoms, periodic properties of the elements, basic concepts of chemical bonding, Lewis symbols and the ionic bonding, molecular geometry and bonding theories, gases, solutions, intermolecular forces, liquids and solids, chemistry of the environment, and chemical kinetics. The lab course is aimed to complement the General Chemistry lecture course by introducing a number of practical experiments. Students will be exposed to aspects of basic chemical laboratory techniques and also some fundamentals of qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: MATH 114, MATH 115, or MATH 117 and CHEM 133. Students whose MATH Placement Examination score placed them in MATH 221 or higher need not take a MATH course coincident with CHEM 103.For majors in the physical and natural sciences, mathematics
CHEM 104: General Chemistry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 1120 General Chemistry 2
Continuation and application of CHEM 103 with additional emphasis on chemical spontaneity, equilibrium, rates of reactions, electrochemistry and organic chemistry.

Study of chemical equilibrium, Le Chartelier's principles, aqueous and acid-base equilibria, solutions, titration, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon; the nonmetallic elements, metals and metallurgy, chemistry of the transition elements, and coordination compounds.The lab course is aimed to complement the General Chemistry II lecture course by introducing a number of practical experiments.
Prerequisite: CHEM 103 and CHEM 133, CHEM 107 or CHEM 111. COREQ: CHEM 134.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: For majors in the physical and natural sciences, mathematics and engineering.
CHEM 133: General Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 1115 Lab for General Chemistry I
Laboratory topics and techniques covered include: stoichiometry, gases, liquids, solids, atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions in solution, and properties of solutions. 42h lab experiments.
Prerequisite: COREQ: MATH 114 or higher and CHEM 103.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 103
CHEM 134: General Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 1125 Lab for General Chemistry II
This laboratory course is the second in a two-semester sequence designed (and required) for science and engineering majors. Covers thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium among gases, liquids and solids, equilibrium in solution, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Topics touched on briefly include transition elements and types and nomenclature of organic compounds. Descriptive chemistry of representative elements is interspersed throughout the course. 42h laboratory experiments.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: CHEM 103 and CHEM 133 , CHEM 107 or CHEM 111. COREQ: CHEM 104.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Must take in conjunction with CHEM 104 General Chemistry
CHEM 322: Organic Chemistry II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 2420 Organic Chemistry 2
Second half of two-semester survey of structure, synthesis and reactions of organic compounds.

Study of alicyclic hydrocarbons; dienes, conjugation and resonance; alkynes; aromaticity, electrophilic aromatic substitution and aromatic-aliphatic compounds; neighboring group effects; aldehydes and ketones; enantiotopic and diastereotopic ligands and faces; carboxylic acids and their derivatives; carbanions; amines; phenols and aryl halides; conjugate and unsaturated compounds. The lab introduces a number of practical experiments on the most usual transformations carried out in any organic chemistry or biochemistry lab today. Students will deal with everyday life organic reactions and the experimental complications that come along with them.
Prerequisite: CHEM 321 COREQ: CHEM 326.
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Not for CHEM/BIOC BS majors.
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 326
CHEM 326: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 2425 Organic Chemistry 2 Laboratory
Laboratory work that introduces the basic laboratory techniques of organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 325. COREQ: CHEM 322.
Restrictions: Not for CHEM/BIOC BS majors.
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 322
CISC 108: Introduction to Computer Science I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CSCI 1300 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming
Computing and principles of programming with an emphasis on systematic program design. Topics include functional programming, data abstraction, procedural abstraction, use of control and state, recursion, testing, and object-oriented programming concepts. Requires no prior programming experience, open to any major, but intended primarily for majors and minors in computer science or mathematics.
Prerequisite: COREQ: MATH 115, MATH 117, or higher math course or math placement.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
COMM 245: Media and Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 2400/2500: Media & Society + Media Lab
The relationship between media and culture; how media affect culture (i.e., socialization and role modeling); and exploration of new forms of mass communication.

We live in a swiftly changing media landscape that requires us to navigate a world of media options, engage in public policy disputes about the impact of media, and adapt to new modes of communicating with others. This 3 credit introductory course provides students with the background and critical skills necessary for understanding how media work and how they impact our everyday lives. By focusing on history, structure, and contemporary issues, the course seeks to give students critical media analytical skills necessary to succeed as professionals, citizens, and members of a global community.

The one-credit 'Media & Society Laboratory' immerses students in the technical and creative aspects of media production using the tools (hardware, software) of photography, video and audio, as well as implicating participatory media such as 'blogs'. Students apply the principles of each mode of production through the completion of a series of individual projects. Moreover, students are set up to explore their particular metacognitive technology practices (how do I learn to learn technology?) and for further practical/theoretical study in the Communication Department.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
UD course COMM 245 earns 3 UD credits. Students must take 4 credits at SLU-Madrid CMM 2400 + CMM 2500. Students will not earn an additional 1 UD credit.
COMM 263: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 1000: Human Communication and Culture
Communicative processes in other cultures as well as subcultures in the US will be discussed. Students will become more mindful and aware of their own cultural patterns as well. Difficulties in cross cultural communication will also be discussed.

The burgeoning field of communication studies, focusing on essential theories and concepts. Emphasis both on interpersonal communication (language, small groups, non-verbal behavior); mass media, particularly popular culture (celebrities, new media); and political communication (media-State relations, elections).
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
COMM 350: Public Speaking (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMM 1200: Introduction to Public Speaking
Analyzes and applies theory and research in public speaking. Develops skills in preparation, presentation and evaluation of speeches. Includes classroom performances.

Poise, polish and intensive practice in perhaps the most important professional skill there is. Extensive practice of the craft with guidance and regular feedback. Emphasis on techniques for structuring speeches, styles of presentation, and the use (and misuse) of argumentation and evidence.
DANC 307: Ethnic Dance Styles: Latin Rhythms & Dance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DANC 2660: Latin Rhythms & Dance
Variable topics course from an array of cultural dance forms. Topics include dance forms of Africa, India, Hawaii, Brazil, among others.

An introduction to the movements and dance routines used in Cuban Salsa, Bachata, Cha-cha-cha and Argentinian Tango. Students will learn to recognize and perform each dance form in order to participate in the end-of-semester performance.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Course is taught in Spanish. Intermediate-level knowledge of Spanish is recommended.
DANC 307: Ethnic Dance Styles: Spanish Dance -Flamenco (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DANC 2650: Spanish Dance: Flamenco
Variable topics course from an array of cultural dance forms. Topics include dance forms of Africa, India, Hawaii, Brazil, among others.

An introduction to the movements and dance routines used in the most basic Flamenco rhythms such as Rumba and Sevillanas. Students will learn to recognize and perform each dance form in order to participate in the end-of-semester performance.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Course is taught in Spanish. Intermediate-level knowledge of Spanish is recommended.
ECON 100: Economic Issues and Policies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 1900 Principles of Economics
Takes a nontechnical approach to basic economics. Applies economic conceptsto contemporary issues, problems and policies. Covers both macro and microtopics.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Students who received credit in ECON101 or ECON103 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
ENGL 214: Literature & Gender (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 2550: Gender, Identity and Literature
Texts that explore and participate in the construction and negotiation of gender, sexuality and identity.

This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Gender and Identity. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 2850: Nation, Identity and Literature
Allows for exploration of a particular aspect of the intersection of literature and culture, and enables in-depth study beyond the period survey course. Topics vary according to the expertise of the instructor.

This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of nation and identity. Through reading a wide variety of genres - including drama, fiction, and poetry - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative and reflective writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
ENGL 372: Studies in Drama: European Drama (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 3170 European Drama
Special topics in an author or authors, a type or types of drama, a period or theme.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
ENGL 373: Studies in Poetry: War in Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGL 3400 War in Literature
Special topics in a poet or poets, a type or movement, a period or theme.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
FREN 106: French II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FREN 1020: Communicating in French II
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Consolidation of essential grammar: use of past and future tenses, and hypothetical conditions; further development of listening and reading strategies; and extensive practice of verbal and writing skills.
Prerequisite: FREN 105
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Two to three years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
HIST 103: World History to 1400 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 1110: Origins of the Modern World to 1500
The course explores principal political, economic, cultural and social developments in world history as they relate to the present. Start and end dates (along with geographic emphasis on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe) varies by instructor.

Developmental approach to the Western World as a confluence of classical, Islamic and Judeo-Christian traditions. Study of the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean and Near East (Greece, Rome and Byzantium); the Asian, Norman and Islamic invasions of Europe; the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Reformation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
HIST 104: World History since 1400 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 1120: Origins of the Modern World 1500 to the Present
The course explores principal political, economic, cultural and social developments in world history as they relate to the present. Start and end dates (along with geographic emphasis on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe) varies by instructor.

Developmental approach to five hundred years of history, with emphasis on increasing European awareness of the rest of the world: the forming of the modern state, the first transatlantic encounters, Catholic and Protestant Reformations, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Ottoman Empire, encounters with Africa and Asia, Marxism, World Wars I and II, and contemporary society.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
HIST 339: Topics in European History: History of the Jews in Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3770: History of the Jews in Spain
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries. The emphasis when taught in Newark is on particular aspects of European history distinct from national narratives. The syllabi are typically complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites when taught abroad. Topics vary but often focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place.

This course examines the history and culture of Jewish peoples in Spain during the Christian Reconquest of the peninsula, the formation of medieval kingdoms, and the final unification of Spain in the late 1400s. Special attention will be paid to the interaction (convivencia) between Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages and then growing persecution under the Spanish Inquisition to Jewish expulsion in 1492. Students take an analytical appraisal of Hispanic civilization, which will allow them to reassess and evaluate problems such as social diversity, identity and religious tolerance.
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Medieval Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3760: Medieval Spain
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries. The emphasis when taught in Newark is on particular aspects of European history distinct from national narratives. The syllabi are typically complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites when taught abroad. Topics vary but often focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place.

Study of 800 years of Jewish, Moorish and Christian occupancy in Spain. Focus on the way each of these civilizations contributed to the social, cultural and political formation of Spanish society, and analysis of the events which brought this era to an end.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: EG BREADTH: COE Breadth Requirement
HIST 348: History of Spain: 1479-Present (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HIST 3320: Early Modern History of Spain: 1469-1818
History of Spain from the unification of the crowns of Aragon and Castile in 1479 to the present. Emphasis on the rise and decline of the Spanish empire, expansion into the New World, and the obstacles for political, social and economic modernization since 1715.

Expansion and decline of an empire: a history of Spain from the reign of Ferdinand and Isabel to the Napoleonic invasion. Analysis of the unification and the colonization of America, from its sixteenth-century heyday through eighteenth-century decadence. Focus on political, socio-economic, religious and cultural perspectives.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
LATN 102: Elementary Latin II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LATN 1020: Reading Latin II
Completion of elementary Latin.

Continued study of Latin. New material includes the regular verbs, some irregular verbs, the fifth declension, the comparison of adjectives, the formation and comparison of adverbs, numerals, construction of time and place, subordinate clauses and uses of the subjunctive.
Prerequisite: LATN 101 or equivalent.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: One year of high school Latin acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
MAST 200: The Oceans (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EAS 1050: Introduction to Oceanography
Integrates physical, chemical, geological and biological principles into an overview that addresses why and how the oceans work. Draws heavily on current ocean issues to illustrate processes and problems.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Open only to non-science majors or with permission from instructor.
MATH 115: Pre-Calculus (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 1400: Pre-Calculus
The various classes of functions and their graphs are explored. Function classes include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric. Skills and concepts needed for calculus (MATH221) are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Requires a grade of C- or better in MATH010 or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placement Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement for more information.
Restrictions: Students who received credit in MATH117, MATH221, MATH222, MATH231, MATH241, MATH242, or MATH243 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
MATH 210: Discrete Mathematics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 1660: Discrete Mathematics
Elements of sets and logic. Relations, functions. Integers. Induction and recursion. Principles and techniques of counting. Graphs. Paths and circuits.

Sets, sequences, strings, symbolic logic, proofs, mathematical induction, sums and products, number systems, algorithms, complexity, graph theory and finite state machines.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: MATH 241, MATH 242, or MATH 232.
MATH 221: Calculus I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 1320: Survey of Calculus
Topics include functions, graphing functions, limits, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration, and techniques of integration. Business applications are emphasized.

Introductory differential and integral calculus, optimization and rate problems, calculus of rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, partial derivatives and applications.
Prerequisite: MATH 115, or MATH 117 or an acceptable score (determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences) on the Math Placement Exam. More information on the Math Placement Exam is available at https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Students who received credit in MATH222, MATH231, MATH241, MATH242, or MATH243 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
SLU Math Dept. Chair explains that this course is geared towards business students due to examples used in the course.
MATH 302: Ordinary Differential Equations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 3550: Differential Equations
Solution and applications of initial-value problems for a single or a system of ordinary differential equations. Topics include the solution of first-order equations, linear first-order systems, linear second-order equations, and elementary phase plane analysis of nonlinear systems. Mathematical software will be used to study some of these topics.

Solution of ordinary differential equations, higher order linear equations, constant coefficient equations, systems of first order equations, linear systems, equilibrium of nonlinear systems, Laplace transformations.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 and MATH 349 (or equivalent knowledge of eigenvalues and eigenvectors). Students who do not meet the MATH 349 prerequisite are advised to take MATH 351 instead of MATH 302.
Restrictions: Students who received credit in MATH305, MATH342, MATH351, or MATH352 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
PHIL 102: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 1050: Introduction to Philosophy: Self & Reality
An examination of such central philosophical problems as ethics, theories of knowledge, the nature of reality, philosophy of religion and political philosophy.

Western philosophy, mathematics and science as they emerged in ancient Greece. Preliminary treatment of seminal work of the Presocratics and Socrates; primary focus on the writings of Plato and Aristotle. Analysis of the Greek contributions to logical, metaphysical and ethical thought.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 203: Ethics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 2050: Ethics
Study of moral value, moral obligation and moral virtue through comparison of notable schools of ethical theory, including utilitarianism, existentialism, Kantianism, classical Greek eudaimonism, pragmatism and Thomism.

An introduction to ethical theory and its application to cases. Whether ethical decisions can be rational; the debate between utilitarians and deontologists; egoism and altruism; different levels of moral discourse.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHYS 144: Concepts of the Universe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYS 1130: Introduction to Astronomy
Survey of astronomy emphasizing early and modern concepts. Stars, planets, galaxies, cosmic evolution and intelligent life are studied in the context of physical principles which describe the dynamics of the universe. Scientific process is used to interpret observations that shape our perceptions of the cosmos.
PHYS 202: Introductory Physics II (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYS 1330 College Physics II & PHYS 1340 College Physics II Laboratory
Second course in a sequence with PHYS 201 that provides an introduction to physics for students in the life and environmental sciences. Topics include wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and optics.

Study of electrostatics, electric field and Coulomb's law; electric current, currents, resistance and Kirchoff's laws; magnetism, induced electromotive force; alternative currents; applications of waves; optics. Focus on modern physics: relativity, quantum physics, particles and cosmology. Laboratory in electricity, magnetism, and optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 201 or PHYS 207. Only one course from PHYS202 and PHYS 208 can count toward graduation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 207: Fundamentals of Physics I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYS 1610 University Physics I & PHYS 162Univeristy Physics I Laboratory
First course in a sequence with PHYS 208 that provides an introduction to physics for those in physical sciences and engineering. Emphasis on Newton’s laws of motion and conservation principles. These are applied to motion in a gravitational field, and to rotation of a rigid body. Integrates conceptual understanding with extensive problem solving and laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: COREQ: MATH 232 or MATH 241.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: One year of high school calculus is recommended.
POSC 270: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 1600: Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to key concepts and patterns in comparative politics. Topics include democratic processes and democratization, economic and political development, political institutions, and civil society. Cases from different parts of the world are examined to provide a grounding in comparative analysis.

Tension and contention in world politics: international conflict and its resolution. Theoretical and applied examination of the interaction between states, transnational organizations and international institutions. Study of the international system and the modern state; East-West, North-South conflicts and nuclear weapons; the Cold War and its aftermath. Emphasis on the European perspective.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 300: Research Methods for Political Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2000: Methods in Political Science
Introduction to research methods including research design and data analysis.

An introduction to research methods of political science. Topics include the behaviorist-traditionalist dichotomy; the nature of science; the application of scientific methods; the quantification of political phenomena; the function of theory and theory building; and surveys and computers.
POSC 330: Political Terrorism (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2640: International Terrorism
Selectively examines cases, trends and organizations which have made the violence termed terrorism so salient. Also examines whether governments, including the U.S., are responding appropriately to the challenge.

Definitions and analyses of terror's complex causes and motivations-religious, political, economic and ideological. Consideration of both historical and theoretical perspectives; treatment of the problems that arise in defining terrorist organizations; analysis of the political economy of terrorist movements; and assessment of institutional responses to terrorist threats. Case studies used to illustrate and clarify the issues surrounding terrorist activity.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
POSC 339: European Union (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 4630 European Union
The European Union is an economic and political union that binds together twenty-seven European countries. This course provides an overview of the history, institutions, policies and controversies surrounding the European Union.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
POSC 409: Topics in World Politics: Political Development in Contemporary Spain (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 3567: Political Development in Contemporary Spain
Topics in world politics. Topics will vary.

Study of historical factors in the political development of Spain and their consequences in contemporary politics. Focus on the Second Republic, the Spanish Civil War, Franco, the Church and religion, the establishment of the new middle classes, the reign of King Juan Carlos I, the Spanish Armed Forces and the emergence of democratic Spain.
POSC 426: Latin American Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLS 2570: Introduction to Latin American Politics
An examination of the dynamics that explain current politics in the region.

Democratization in Latin America is an ongoing process. More than thirty years on from the 1980s wave of democratization the region presents significant variations in its political trends. Political events such as those in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Argentina or Peru demonstrate that transition to democracy is risky and that democratic consolidation is far from being achieved. Rather than bringing more certainty or stability to the political arena, democratization has engendered new forms of organization by state institutions and civil society and new sources of antagonism and unrest. However, there seem to be few exceptions to the rule that democracy is the only game in town. This course analyses the challenges confronting democracy in the region.
PSYC 100: General Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 1010: General Psychology
Introduction to the process of psychological science. Includes coverage of research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, abnormal behavior and treatment, developmental psychology, and social and personality psychology.

Introduction to modern psychology through lectures and practical work. Brief review of the history of psychology and of psychological research methods. Focus on biopsychology and neuroscience; sensation, perception; learning; psychology of action, cognition, motivation, emotion, social behavior, developmental and individual differences.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 207: Research Methods (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 2050: Foundations of Research Methods and Statistics
Reviews the major issues involved in the design of psychological experiments. Includes measurement issues, internal and external validity of experiments, research with single subjects, and research ethics. Discusses both laboratory and field research.

Fosters understanding of psychology as a science. Integrates introduction to basic designs, hypothesis generation, ethics, and writing conventions with computation of descriptive statistics and conceptual overview of inferential techniques. Preparation for: reading empirical articles, applied and advanced courses, working on faculty research, senior inquiry research projects. Team exercises in lab.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in PSYC 100 or NSCI 100.
Restrictions: Open to PSYC and NSCI majors and minors.
Students must enroll in both lecture and lab for PSY 2050: Foundations of Research Methods and Statistics.
PSYC 340: Cognition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 3120: Cognitive Psychology
Examination of how the mind works, covering topics such as perception, vision, attention, memory, language, concepts and decision making. Major themes include understanding the mind/brain relationship, using empirical data to develop and evaluate cognitive theories, and understanding the implications of cognitive research for everyday life.

Discussion of higher-order cognitive processes, including memory functioning, reasoning, thinking, problem-solving, language production and comprehension.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207 and in PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301), except for Neuroscience majors.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
PSYC 350: Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 3210: Developmental Psychology: Child
An analysis of theory and research in developmental psychology including the topics of developmental processes, developmental risk, systems theory and contemporary social issues.

Survey of the facts and fictions of child development, as an introduction to the theories, research methods, and empirical findings that make up the field of Developmental Psychology. Emphasis on normative psychological development from conception to puberty, including aspects of cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional and personality development.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207, and PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
PSYC 370: Research in Personality (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY 3310: Personality Theory
An analysis of contemporary issues and research in personality including the assessment of personality traits, the personality situation interaction and the social and biological bases of individual differences.

A survey of the major theories of psychology as they relate to human personality. Emphasis on historical and modern perspectives of personality development and the scientific study of personality psychology.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207, and PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
PYSC 380: Psychopathology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PSY4390: Abnormal Psychology
Exploration of research on diagnosis, etiology and treatment of major pathological disorders. Emphasis on original research articles, class discussion and assessment instruments, in addition to analysis of video-taped interviews with patients used to illustrate the disorders.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207, and PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
SPAN 105: Spanish I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 1010: Communicating in Spanish I
Introduction to the Spanish language and a development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.

Emphasis on listening comprehension, reading strategies, and oral and written expression. Development of a solid grammatical base through study of verb conjugations, simple tenses, reflexive verbs and basic linguistic constructions.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: No Spanish background, two or fewer years of high school Spanish.
SPAN 107: Spanish III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 1020: Communicating in Spanish II
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, and reading texts of average difficulty.

Further development of language skills essential for social and academic life in Spain. Consolidation of past and future tenses, introduction to subjunctive tenses and use of pronouns, prepositions and conjugations.
Prerequisite: SPAN 106
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Four years of high school Spanish acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
SPAN 200: Spanish Composition & Grammar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 2010: Intermediate Spanish: Language & Culture
First part of a thorough grammar review and intensive practice, targeting structure, essential vocabulary, speaking, listening and extensive writing.

Development of language skills in the context of current issues in Spanish society and culture. Study of simple and compound indicative tenses; emphasis on present subjunctive conjugation and command forms; intensive review of all verb tenses and basic grammatical structures.
Prerequisite: SPAN 107.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
SPAN 206: Spanish Culture through Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 3020: Oral Communication
Discussion of topics drawn from contemporary Spanish or Latin American life. For students who wish to broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture while improving their oral and aural language skills.

Focus on strategies for achieving greater understanding, accuracy and fluency in the language of modern-day Spain.
Prerequisite: SPAN107
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Taught abroad only. Students who received credit in SPAN205 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
SPAN 300: Advanced Spanish Composition and Grammar I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 4000: Advanced Spanish Grammar
Second part of a thorough review and intensive practice, targeting structure, essential vocabulary, speaking, listening and extensive writing.

Review of advanced grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions and syntax to develop awareness of appropriate language use.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
SPAN 306: Practical Oral/Written Expression (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 3040: In Conversation with the Hispanic World
Strengthens skills in grammar and vocabulary in preparation for advanced courses. Includes oral exposes, discussion of articles and videos, textual analysis and compositions.

Intensive practice of both formal and colloquial spoken Spanish, with particular attention to social, political, economic and cultural issues. Speaking skills developed through oral presentations, commentary and discussion, based on texts from diverse media sources.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200.
Restrictions: Taught abroad only. Students who received credit in SPAN305 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
SPAN 355: Special Topics: Introduction to Spanish Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 4200: Introduction to Spanish Literature
Explores an area of special interest in Hispanic literature.

Study of basic literary concepts and methods of textual analysis. Introduction to different literary genres and their historical development. Readings from a selection of outstanding canonical works from both peninsular and Latin American literature.
Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
STAT 200: Basic Statistical Practice (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH3850: Foundations of Statistics; OPM2070: Intro: Business Statistics or STAT1100: Introduction to Statistics
Uses data from a variety of disciplines to explore topics in statistical data analysis, estimation, and inference. The following topics will be covered: graphical displays; measures of position, central tendency, and variability; basic probability rules; discrete probability distributions; binomial distribution; normal and standard normal probability distributions; sampling distributions; the t distribution; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for one mean or proportion; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for two means or proportions; correlation and simple linear regression.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Confer with Program Coordinator to determine which SLU-Madrid course equivalent is appropriate based on your major.
UNIV 373-026: Study Abroad - Madrid, Spain (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
The Semester in Madrid, Spain is designed for undergraduate students regardless of major. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required. A minimum 2.800 grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) is required.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please email a copy of your official transcript to the Program Coordinator.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Spring Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,400.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and CGPS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in mid-October.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early January.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • CGPS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Final Tuition based on current year$6,490.00$17,420.00
Final Program Fee$12,800.00$12,800.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (final)$19,290.00$30,220.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,400.00$1,400.00
The rates above may not apply to you if you are a UD graduate student during the time you are studying abroad. Please refer to http://www1.udel.edu/finaid/rates.html for the appropriate rates.
The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students does not apply to winter or summer session and is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onSeptember 20, 2021
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedSeptember 29, 2021
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *mid-October
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly January
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Marie Gleason
Study Abroad Coordinator
302-831-2852
302-831-6042
mgleason@udel.edu
File Downloads
Video

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.