Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[103]
Spring 2022: Athens, Greece
January 03, 2022 - April 17, 2022 (dates are tentative)
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Photo Credit: Elizabeth Stulir, 18W Athens
Meetings
Interest Meetings:
04/06/2021 4:00 PM - 5:00 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEud--hqD4sEt2fIqhKQ9-reCfMnOTUMHUy
04/21/2021 6:00 PM - 7:00 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEkde2opjIrHNLIL_zBv-A0d4Uu4yMahIL_
09/09/2021 12:30 PM - 1:30 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMqc-qqrzIpE9P-XGmYTymqo0FOHMD6mQAi
09/14/2021 7:00 PM - 8:00 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJApf-6sqzMrHtNCjTmxm2hHov6WAeb6er5v
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
10/14/2021 7:00 PM - 8:30 PMVisa Process - Ray Street, C Lounge and Zoom TBD
10/21/2021 4:00 PM - 5:00 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAldempqD0tHdQCG0xQjZDoMmzcxyaw00Z-
11/18/2021 4:00 PM - 5:00 PMTBD
Program Notes
If you do not have a current passport, you should be aware that COVID-19 has delayed passport processing times significantly. The U.S. State Department has announced that it now takes an average of 18 weeks (4.5 months) to process a passport.

Given the circumstances, if you want to study abroad in 2022, you need to apply for or renew your passport NOW - even if you’re not 100% sure about your study abroad plans yet. We recommend expediting both the processing time and the shipping time for your passport.


In order to be prepared to apply for their Greek visa, by October 1 all applicants must have a passport valid six months after the program's end date.

Traveling and studying abroad during a global pandemic poses new challenges and requires accepting a higher level of uncertainty than in the past. Students who choose to study abroad at this time must be prepared to adapt to the evolving situation and must take responsibility to act in accordance with the rules, regulations, and recommendations of UD, their program leadership, and legal authorities of their home and host country. Due to the rapidly changing and unpredictable global and local response to COVID-19, these rules, regulations and recommendations are subject to change at any time.

The University will continue to monitor the ongoing situation with COVID-19 (coronavirus) as we approach the departure date for this program. Please reach out to your program coordinator or faculty director with questions and continue to monitor the UD coronavirus webpage for updates.

If UD decides to cancel a study abroad program, we will communicate directly with affected students. In this case, the University of Delaware will reimburse the cost of program fees, tuition and flights (if purchase was advised by the CGPS).
Program Description

Make your home in the place where modern education, democracy, and Western civilization began. Walk in the steps of ancient philosophers and travel to sites of classical antiquity that you may have only seen in books or movies. Spend a semester studying in Athens at the University of Delaware's partner, the American College of Greece (ACG). Founded in 1875, ACG is the oldest American-accredited college in Europe and the largest private college in Greece. Located in the Athens metropolitan neighborhood of Aghia Paraskevi, ACG's 64-acre campus overlooks the capital city. ACG is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education in the U.S. and boasts top faculty and scholars from across the globe and an international student body representing 58 countries.

ACG on-campus facilities and resources include a simulated trading room, fully online library, computer labs, both a black box theatre and outdoor amphitheatre, as well as an Olympic-sized swimming pool and indoor athletic arena. ACG's status as a full-fledged secondary educational institution means that it offers the services and amenities to support a successful semester, including counseling, career services, health services, a writing center, and more. In addition, UD students in Athens may choose to participate in student clubs, music, theatre, intramural sports, and Intercollegiate athletics such as basketball, rugby, soccer, swimming, tennis, volleyball, and water polo.

ACG courses are taught in English except for foreign language courses. Some of the courses include out-of-class experiences around Athens (which may require an additional fee) to take advantage of the city’s historic and artistic treasures.

Experiential Learning
Semester-long study abroad programs may offer opportunities for more immersive experiences such as internships or community service engagement. This program includes community service opportunities as offered through ACG. The university provides extensive off-campus activities, including community outreach opportunities, field trips, service-oriented clubs, and a 3-day "Meaningful Engagement Trip" to another region of Greece (at an additional cost and via competitive application), all designed to facilitate intercultural understanding and respect through true cultural and linguistic immersion experiences.

Students will live in double-occupancy apartment-style residence halls with kitchens and laundry and fitness facilities just a short walk from campus. Students may choose to purchase a campus dining plan and/or opt for single accommodation for an additional fee (availability not guaranteed).

The Program Fee includes housing, airport pick-up in Athens during specified arrival window, international health insurance, several excursions, as well as full access to all ACG facilities and campus activities.

NOTE: The program fee does NOT include airfare, meals, airport ground transportation upon return may be included dependent on travel details, or visa expenses. Students are responsible for obtaining their Greek visa and should budget approximately $175 for associated expenses which includes an FBI background check. Students will receive detailed travel instructions after acceptance. See the Cost section below for estimate airfare. For this program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries. After acceptance, students will receive instructions regarding how to take advantage of ACG's pick-up service on the program's starting date. The program officially begins when students arrive in Athens.

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcomed and encouraged to study abroad, but should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
All courses are taught in English except for foreign language courses. Note that course offerings are subject to change. A final list will be available in mid-November. Maximum enrollment is for 15 credits.
ANTH 101: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 1000 Introduction to Anthropology
Major ideas and areas of study in social and cultural anthropology. Use of ethnographic data and film to illustrate the anthropologist’s view of societies in their sociocultural and ecological dimensions.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
ANTH 102: Human Biology, Behavior, and Evolution (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 2002 Human Evolution and Physical Anthropology
Biological evolution: principles and mechanisms. The evolution of primates. Contemporary studies of primate behavior. Biological endowment and the creation of culture. Gaps and problems in the theories of the evolution of humans.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
ANTH 235: Anthropology of Food (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HHU 2218 LE Food In/As Culture: Perspectives On Greek Culinary Traditions
An interdisciplinary treatment of food as key element of political, social, and cultural dimensions of Greek experience. Combining theoretical and methodological approaches in archaeology and anthropology, and focusing on the Greek context, the course guides students through an exploration of culinary practices from the prehistoric to the present days, placing emphasis on food as a sign of ethnic, gender, religious, local, trans-local and multicultural identities. Short field trips in the city center and museums unveil the long culinary history of the city of Athens, highlighting multicultural influences in the development of Greece's distinctive culinary culture.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Crosslisted at ACG with HSS 2218
ANTH 325: Peoples of Europe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 2010 Greek Folklore & Ethnography
Cultures and subcultures of Europe, with special attention to the rural sectors and their historical development. When offered in Athens, this course discusses the history, theory and evolution of folkloric studies in post revolutionary Greece. It is useful to students who study Greek history, literature and culture because it defines elements that helped shape a Modern Greek sense of identity. It offers a suitable medium for comparison with other states that became independent in the nineteenth century.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ANTH 350: Contemporary Topics in Anthropology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 2011 Anthropology in Greece Today
Greek socio/cultural anthropology in twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A critical appreciation of writings about identity, gender and politics in Greece from an anthropological perspective.
APEC 343: Environmental Economics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 3334 Environmental and Resource Economics - Level 5
This course introduces the student to the consequences of the interaction of market activity to the environment. It enables the student to understand how environmental problems are the outcome of market failure and, consequently, the role of governments in addressing such problems. It introduces the student to theory and practice of alternative environmental regulatory policies and natural resource management policies at the national and international levels. It complements the economic theory courses that students have taken by illustrating how abstract economic models are actually used at the national and international levels to address issues related to environmental problems.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ART 129: Design for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 1005: Fundamentals of 2D Forms - Color & Design I
Introduction to art and design principles within creative problem solving assignments using 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional media. Design organization criteria, technical craftsmanship, and artistic objectives interconnect to support production of original expressive statements.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Other: May serve as ART 209 for ART majors
Restrictions: Open to non-majors.
UD ART majors require course substitution for ART 209 Core Design
ART 133: Drawing for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 1003: Fundamentals of 2D Forms - Drawing I
Projects involving black-and-white and color studies in a variety of media, including charcoal, pencil, ink, and pastels.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Other: May serve as ART 235 for ART majors
Restrictions: Open to non-majors.
UD ART majors require course substitution for ART 235 Core Drawing
ART 180-000: Digital Photography for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 1017: Digital Image
Introduces the basics of photography as a way to communicate ideas emphasizing content, composition, and technique. Examines contemporary artists and historic movements through research, gallery visits and lectures. Using a digital camera and visual editing software students create, edit and critique images.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors.
Not applicable for UD ART majors
ART 204-000: Media/Design/Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 2001/GD 2001: Visual Literacy
An investigation of a variety of visual structures as they appear in contemporary cultures through art, design and media. Visual rhetoric and visual meanings are examined through texts and creative practice.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
Other: Course satisfies Core requirements for UD ART majors
ART 231: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 3025 Painting
Introduction to fundamental concepts of painting, both abstract and representational. Compositions showing the function of color, value scale, placement, proportion and volume.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Other: May serve as ART 236 for ART majors
UD ART majors require course substitute for ART 236 Core Painting
ART 250: Introduction to Sculpture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AR 1007: Fundamentals of 3D Forms - Sculpture 1 - Level 4
Introduction to a wide variety of construction techniques and tools to create sculpture working in metal and wood including welding and woodshop equipment.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 289: Documentary Photography (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HFP 2202 LE Documentary Photography
The course teaches students to develop a meaningful relationship with lived experience through documentary photography, a form of visual storytelling that chronicles historical events and/or significant scenes of life. Through readings as well as hands-on experience, students will be guided to explore the cultural, aesthetic, political, and ethical issues involved in this artistic and journalistic genre. Major emphasis is placed on experiential learning of the subject, and for this reason much of the course is taught on site. The course presupposes only basic knowledge of photography, as well as ownership of a digital camera.
ARTH 198: Studies in World Art & Architecture: Art of Ancient Greece (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AT 2005 Art of Ancient Greece - Level 4
The art of ancient Greece from the Geometric period through the coming of Rome. Diverse types of artistic production, including religious and secular architecture, sculpture, pottery, grave artefacts. Greek Art in its historical and social context.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 198: Studies in World Art and Architecture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AT 1000 History of Art I
Monuments and artworks of the world, studied in a comparative and/or cross-cultural perspective. Topics highlight global cultural diversity in the history of art and architecture. When offered on this program, the course content is a survey of Western art from the Palaeolithic through the Medieval periods.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit twice when topics vary.
ARTH 198: Studies in World Art and Architecture: History of Architecture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AT 1025 History of Architecture
Examination of Western architecture from the Early Modern Period to the Present, through a series of key monuments and their context.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 198: Studies in World Art and Architecture: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 2122 Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens
A site-based introduction to the topography and monuments of Athens from the Geometric period up to the Roman period.



-Required museum visits



-Additional fees apply.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199: Topics in Art History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AT 1001 History of Art II
An introduction to great artists and their masterpieces. Topics change with each time of offering. Specific topics may focus on a crucial moment in history, or on a particular theme explored throughout the ages. When offered on this program, the course is content is a survey of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, through a series of key artworks.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit twice when topics vary.
ARTH 199: Topics in Art History: Aspects of Greek Arts in Athens (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 2027 Aspects of Greek Art in Athens
An introductory exploration of aspects of Greek art, broadly defined chronologically, through 'hands on experience,' utilizing the collections available in museums, in galleries and on sites in Athens.

-Students who have taken AT 2005 (Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece) cannot take AH 2027 (previously AT 2027) for credit when it addresses Ancient Greek Art.

-Students who have taken AT 2017 (Modern Greek Art) cannot take AH 2027 for credit when the content relates to Modern Greek Art.

-Required museum visits.

-Additional fees apply.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 199: Topics in Art History: Modern Greek Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AT 3017 Modern Greek Art
Modern Greek art from the formation of the Greek state in the nineteenth century to the present. Focus on the historical/political/social events that determined the developments of art in conjunction with the creation of modern Greek identity.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 239: Art & Architecture in Europe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AT 3021: The Bronze Age of Greece
Primary focus on painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe from the Romanesque to the Modern eras. Subject matter determined by country in which overseas program is conducted. When offered on this program, the course content is the art and archaeology of Crete, the Cycladic islands and the mainland of Greece from 4000 to 1000 BC.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
BISC 267: Seminar: Introduction To Biology I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BI 1000 LE Introduction to Biology I
An integrated exploration of the fundamentals of biology as a science, the nature of life, biological chemistry, cell biology, metabolism and human body anatomy and function.
BISC 267: Seminar: Introduction to Biology II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BI 1101 Introduction to Biology II - Level 4
An integrated exploration of major principles of biology. Emphasis on diversity of life, development, cell division, molecular biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Consideration of issues and applications related to society.
BISC 302: General Ecology (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BI 1007 Environmental Ecology - Level 4
Fundamentals of the science of ecology, including an introduction to life and the physical environment. Adaptations of organisms and evolution, population structure and regulation, species interactions, community ecology, biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological applications.
Whatever grade the student earns in BI1007 would apply to both UD BISC 302 and BISC 367
BISC 366: Independent Study: Introduction to Molecular Biology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BI 1002 Introduction to Molecular Biology
Principles and applications of molecular biology, with emphasis on recombinant DNA technology, gene isolation and cloning, gene transfer into mammalian cells, transgenic animals, regulation of gene expression,molecular diagnostics,molecular biology of cancer and gene therapy.
BISC 366: Independent Study: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BMS 3220 Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
An analysis of essential microbiology and infectious disease. The course introduces the major classes of micro-organisms and through their biological adaptations relates them to human activity. Their beneficial and harmful roles on humans is discussed through case studies, disease profiles and epidemiological analysis.
Prerequisite: BISC 205 or BISC 207
BISC 367: Introduction to Molecular Biology (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BI 1002 Introduction to Molecular Biology
Principles and applications of molecular biology, with emphasis on recombinant DNA technology, gene isolation and cloning, gene transfer into mammalian cells, transgenic animals, regulation of gene expression,molecular diagnostics,molecular biology of cancer and gene therapy.
BUAD 301: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MK 2030 Fundamentals of Marketing
Management of the marketing functions, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, pricing, personal selling, and advertising. Emphasis on consumer and industrial markets.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 302: Marketing Research (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MK 4358 Marketing Research
Focuses on the marketing research process as an aid in marketing decision making. Defining marketing problems, identifying marketing information needs, developing methods to gather information, and applying research results to marketing problems.
Prerequisite: BUAD 301, and MATH 202 or MISY 262, and MISY 160 or CISC 101.
BUAD 306: Introduction to Service and Operations Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 4343 Operations Management
Analysis of major problems faced by operations managers at different levels ofmanagement. Topics include scheduling, forecasting, process design, inventorymanagement and quality management.
Prerequisite: MATH 201 or STAT200.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: COE Professional & Career Preparation Requirement
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 309: Organizational Behavior (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 3034 Managing People & Organizations
Examines individual, group, and organizational determinants of work behavior in organizations. Theory and concepts relevant to individual differences, attitudes, motivation, teams, leadership, power, and organizational culture and change are discussed with an emphasis on applying this knowledge to the challenges of management in a variety of organizations.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 384: Global Business Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IB 2006 LE International Business - Level 4
Evaluation of the elements of the national, international, and global environments that influence the context and conduct of international business. Emphasizes aspects of the cultural, political, economic, legal-regulatory, trade, financial, and institutional environments.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 386: International Business Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IB 3121 Global Business Management - Level 5
Focuses on management of international business through analysis of opportunities and challenges that face international companies. Develops the perspectives and frameworks that guide how managers direct international business activities.
Prerequisite: BUAD 100 or BUAD 309
BUAD 421: Human Resource Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 4131 Strategic Human Resources Management
Explores traditional topic areas (e.g., planning, selection, training, compensation, performance appraisal, career development, legal regulations) and contemporary issues (e.g., workforce diversity, the link between human resource strategy and firm strategy) related to the effective management of human resources in organizations.
Prerequisite: BUAD 309
BUAD 473: Consumer Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MK 3159 Consumer Behaviour
Explores a variety of topics including: the decision processes associated with buying, consuming, and disposing of products, services, and ideas; social, cultural, and psychological influences on consumer decision making and consumption patterns; the relationship between consumer behavior and marketing decision making.
Prerequisite: BUAD 301
BUAD 475: International Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MK 4157/IB 4157 International Marketing
Analysis of the concepts and practices relating to the marketing of products and services internationally. Focus on the uncontrollable environmental forces facing an international marketer, issues relating to the standardization of marketing strategies across countries and the unique problems of specific international markets.
Prerequisite: BUAD 100 or BUAD 301.
BUAD 477: Digital Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MK 4104 Digital and Social Media Marketing
Explore the possibility and limitations of various internet marketing media and learn how to apply and adapt basic and advanced marketing strategies to construct and critically evaluate internet marketing efforts, their impact, and their practical use in marketing contexts. Develop skills related to social media, web analytics, and a wide variety of other formats. Examine strategies for creating, managing, and measuring two-way marketing conversations with consumers on a variety of digital platforms, including mobile devices.
Prerequisite: BUAD 301
Restrictions: Open to international business studies and marketing majors only.
CHEM 100: Chemistry & the Human Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CH 1005 LE An Introduction to the Organic World
An introduction to modern organic and biological structures. An issues based approach that studies biological, environmental, nutritional and material science-related topics via a chemical perspective with an emphasis on the chemistry of livings things.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
CHEM 101: General Chemistry (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CH 1002: Principles of Chemistry
Fundamental laws of chemical action and the properties, uses and methods of preparation of the more important elements and their compounds. Includes 42 hours of laboratory work that introduces basic experiments in general chemistry.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: One year of high school chemistry recommended; high school algebra or concurrent enrollment in MATH 010 or higher mathematics course strongly recommended. Only one course among CHEM101, CHEM 103, CHEM107. and CHEM 111 can count toward graduation.
CHEM 321: Organic Chemistry I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CH 3220 Organic Chemistry - Level 5
First half of two-semester survey of structure, synthesis, and reactions of organic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHEM 104 and CHEM 134, CHEM 108 or CHEM 112. Co-req: CHEM 325.
Restrictions: Not for CHEM/BIO BS majors.
CHEM 325: Organic Chemistry Laboratory i (1 credit)
Provider Equivalent: CH 3330 Organic and Biological Chemistry Lab - Level 5
Laboratory work that introduces the basic laboratory techniques of organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 104 and CHEM 134 or CHEM 108. Co-req CHEM 321.
Restrictions: Not for CHEM/BIOC BS majors.
CISC 101: Principles of Computing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 1070 Information Technology Fundamentals
Introduces students to the central ideas of computing and computer science including programs, algorithms, abstraction, the internet, and information systems. Instills ideas and practices of computational thinking and engages students in activities that show how computing and computer science change the world. Explores computing as a creative activity and empowers students to apply computational thinking to all disciplines including the arts, humanities, business, social and physical sciences, health, and entertainment.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Does not count toward graduation if taken after any other CISC course. Not open to students with credit for MISY 160 or APEC 135 .
CISC 106: General Computer Science for Engineers (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITS 2188 Introduction to Programming
Principles of computer science illustrated and applied through programming in a general-purpose language. Programming projects illustrate computational problems, styles, and issues that arise in engineering.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 or any higher level MATH course
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Student may not receive credit for both CISC106 and CISC 108.
CISC 106: General Computer Science for Engineers (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 2276 C Language Programming - Level 4
Principles of computer science illustrated and applied through programming in a general-purpose language. Programming projects illustrate computational problems, styles, and issues that arise in engineering.

C language logic and code structure; data types; scalars and aggregates; pointers and address arithmetic; files and devices; programming and debugging techniques.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 or any higher level MATH course
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Student may not receive credit for both CISC106 and CISC 108.
CISC 167: Mobile Application Development (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3225 Mobile Application Development
Programming mobile devices; user interface design; user interface building; input methods; data storage; motion sensing; memory management; exception handling.
CISC 167: Network Administration (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3319 Network Administration
Installation and administration concepts. Management, monitoring, and optimization of system performance, reliability, and availability. Design issues and support in a corporate environment. Troubleshooting and end user support.
CISC 167: Seminar: Designing for the Web (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3015 (Same as GD 3015) Designing for the Web
A brief history of the web; web standards, browser standards; choosing a domain name; hosting management tools; web publishing; web design and development tools; website architecture; using image editing software to design web layouts; HTML, CSS, search engine optimization; social media integration; interface design standards; user interaction experience.
CISC 167: Seminar: Mobile Application Development (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3225 Mobile Application Development
Programming mobile devices; user interface design; user interface building; input methods; data storage; motion sensing; memory management; exception handling.
CISC 167: Seminar: Network Administration (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3319 Network Administration
Installation and administration concepts. Management, monitoring, and optimization of system performance, reliability, and availability. Design issues and support in a corporate environment. Troubleshooting and end user support.
CISC 167: Turning Data into Decisions (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 1112 Turning Data Into Decisions
Data protection legislation; ethical use of data; the contribution of data analysis to organizational sustainability; visualizing data using graphs, charts and 3D maps; using functions and analytical tools for what -if analysis; using data reporting tools; linking of worksheets and workbooks; importing and manipulating data.
CISC 181: Introduction to Computer Science II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3234 Object Oriented Programming
Principles of computer science illustrated and applied through programming in an object oriented language. Programming projects illustrate computational problems, styles and issues that arise in computer systems development and in all application areas of computation.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CISC 108 or CISC 106.
COREQ: MATH 221, MATH 241, or a higher level math course or math placement.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
CISC 320: Introduction to Algorithms (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3413 Algorithms and Complexity
Design and analysis of algorithms: worst/average case analysis, proofs for correctness and performance of algorithms. Algorithmic strategies (divide and conquer, greedy methods, dynamic programming, etc.). Algorithms for searching, forming and traversal of strings, trees and graphs. Categorization of computational problems: classes P and NP. NP completeness.
Prerequisite: MATH 210 and a minimum grade of C- in CISC 220.
CISC 361: Operating Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 2293 Operating Systems Concepts
Principles and techniques employed in the development of operating systems and their control programs. Includes management of memory, processors, I/O devices.
Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in both CISC 220 and CISC 260. CPEG 222 may be substituted for CISC 260.
Restrictions: A minimum gradeCISC 360 recommended as a prerequisite.
CISC 437: Database Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3260 Fundamentals of RDBMS
Physical and logical organization of databases. Data retrieval languages, relational database languages, security and integrity, concurrency, distributed databases.
Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in CISC 220
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC437 and CISC637.
CISC 449: Topics in Computer Applications: Digital Media Capstone Project (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITS 4959 Digital Media Capstone Project
Contents will vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC449 and CISC649.
CISC 449: Topics in Computer Applications: Interactive Multimedia Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4371 Interactive Multimedia Systems
Contents will vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC449 and CISC649.
CISC 449: Topics in Computer Applications: Modelling Methodologies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3129 3D Modelling Methodologies
Contents will vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC449 and CISC649.
CISC 449: Topics in Computer Applications: Software Development Capstone Project (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4918 Software Development Capstone Project
Contents will vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC449 and CISC649.
CISC 459: Topics in Communications, Distributed Computing and Networks (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4827 Networking Capstone Project
Contents vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Prerequisite: CISC 450
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC459 and CISC659.
CISC 459: Topics in Communications, Distributed Computing and Networks: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4426 Distributed Systems
Contents vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Prerequisite: CISC 450
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC459 and CISC659.
CISC 459: Topics in Communications, Distributed Computing and Networks: Virtualization Concepts & Applications (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4426 Virtualization Concepts & Applications
Contents vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty.
Prerequisite: CISC 450
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC459 and CISC659.
CISC 474: Advanced Web Technologies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4314 Internet Programming
Programming and architecture of web servers and the technologies for implementing high performance, sophisticated web sites for applications like e-commerce. Students learn how to install and set-up a web server, how to write and install programs for a web server, and how to design and implement multi-tier client/server applications with database backends.
Prerequisite: CISC 275
CISC 479: Topics in Architecture and Software (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4135 Game Design
Contents will vary to coincide with the interests of students and faculty.
Prerequisite: CISC 361
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC479 and CISC679.
CISC 483: Introduction to Data Mining (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3333 Data Mining and Big Data
Concepts, techniques, and algorithms for mining large data sets to discover structural patterns that can be used to make subsequent predictions. Emphasis on practical approaches and empirical evaluation. Use of a workbench of data mining tools, such as the Weka toolkit.
Prerequisite: CISC 220 and MATH 205 or MATH 350.
CISC 489: Topics: Artificial Intelligence: Game Programming (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4417 Game Programming
Contents vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty. When offered on this program, the course contents are: the conceptual framework of interactive environments. Game programming approaches. Techniques and tools. Manipulation of visual effects and sound. Object animation. Movement control. Worlds. Interactivity.
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC489 and CISC689.
CISC 489: Topics: Artificial Intelligence: Web Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 4541 Web Science
Contents vary to coincide with the interests of students and current faculty. When offered on this program, the course contents are: Social network characteristics. Network measures and models. Data mining in social networks.
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both CISC489 and CISC689.
COMM 263: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 3020 Intercultural Communication
Communicative processes in other cultures as well as subcultures in the US will be discussed. Students will become more mindful and aware of their own cultural patterns as well. Difficulties in cross cultural communication will also be discussed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
COMM 301: Introduction to Communication Research Methods (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CN 4632 Communication Research Methods
The conceptual bases of research methodology: formulating questions, designing, conducting and analyzing research.
Prerequisite: COMM 256 or COMM 245 or COMM 330
Restrictions: Not open to freshmen.
COMM 330-000: Communication & Interpersonal Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SP 2206: Interpersonal Communication
Introduces key principles of interpersonal communication and discusses their application across diverse contexts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
COMM 350: Public Speaking (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SP 2300: Presentation Skills
Analyzes and applies theory and research in public speaking. Develops skills in preparation, presentation and evaluation of speeches. Includes classroom performances.
CPEG 202: Introduction to Digital Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC2186 Computer Systems Architecture
Analysis and design of logic circuits. Topics include: Boolean algebra and its application to switching circuits, simplification of switching functions, design of logic circuits at gate level and with MSI and LSI components. Analysis and design of synchronous and asynchronous sequential state machines.
CRJU 110: Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JS 1001: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Overview of the American criminal justice system. Examination of its various phases: investigation and detection of crimes by the police; prosecution of alleged offenders; adjudication of cases by courts; imprisonment of convicted offenders; re-integration. Study of the role, organization, ethics and limitations of law enforcement, courts and corrections. Study of their interactions and interdependence. Emphasis on the IV and V Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
DANC 367: Body Awareness and Movement (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DA 2018 LE Body Awareness and Movement - Level 4
Practical anatomy and physiology of the moving body. Health & safety of the moving body, awareness of an individual's body schema, movement range and kinaesthetic sense as a foundation to understand the expressive potential of kinetic form. Ethics of working "physically" with others.
ECON 100: Economic Issues and Policies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 1003: LE Economics of Everyday Life
Takes a nontechnical approach to basic economics. Applies economic concepts to contemporary issues, problems and policies. Covers both macro and microtopics.

Key economic principles and basic business operations in a free market society. Essential economics for citizens and consumers. Basic quantitative skills needed for managing one's personal finances, and for interpreting economic developments in a way that will allow one to make informed decisions as a citizen.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Students who received credit in ECON101 or ECON103 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
ECON 101-000: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 1000: Principles of Microeconomics
Introduces supply and demand concepts with basic economic graphs. Examines models of perfect and imperfect competition and determinants of production price and quantity. Covers microeconomic issues such as the effect of government regulation and environmental problems.
Prerequisite: COREQ: One of the following: MATH 114, MATH 115, MATH 117, MATH 221, MATH231, MATH232, MATH 241, MATH 242, or MATH 243.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 103-000: Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 1101: Principles of Macroeconomics
The role of the government in a mixed economy. National income accounts. Economic fluctuations, unemployment and inflation. Fiscal and monetary policy. Macroeconomic controversies.
Prerequisite: Co-requisites recommended: One of the following: MATH 114, MATH 115, MATH 117, MATH 221, MATH 241, MATH 242, or MATH 243.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 167: Seminar: Economic History of Europe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 2011: Economic History of Europe
The economic development of Europe from the early Middle Ages to the present. The allocation of scarce resources throughout history and the emergence of institutions attempting to solve problems associated with such allocation. The relationship between economic events and cultural, political, social, religious, and demographic trends and between economic events and economic thought.
ECON 308: Banking and Monetary Policy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 3240 Money and Banking
Nature and economic significance of money, credit and the banking system; the origin and management of the money supply; and effects of monetary changes on price levels, output and employment.
Prerequisite: ECON 103
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
ECON 342: Studies in International Economics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 3221 Economic Development of Modern Greece - Level 5
Major trends in Greek economy since WWII. Fiscal and monetary policies. Sectoral analyses and discussion of problems, like inflation, tax evasion, the public debt, the balance of payments, education, and social security. From accession to the EEC to membership of the Eurozone. The onset of crisis, 2009-10.
Prerequisite: ECON 101, ECON 103
ENGL 205: British Literature to 1660 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 2220: English Literature: Chaucer to Swift
Study of representative Medieval and Renaissance British works, set in their historical and cultural contexts, introducing appropriate critical concepts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
ENGL 207: Introduction to Poetry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 2348 Introduction to Poetry
Close analysis of a wide range of English and American poets and poems from all periods, with a concentration on various aesthetic and thematic aspects of the genre.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 222: Introduction to Professional Writing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 3742 Professional Communication
Designed specifically for English majors who want to explore professional writing careers, this course introduces the rhetorical theory, genre studies, and practical writing skills that form the basis of numerous professional writing and editing disciplines.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GL 2224 Currents in Modern Greek Literature
Survey of Modern Greek literature (in English translation) from the late nineteenth century to the present. Focus on the prose and poetry of major authors. Works examined for their individual stylistic and thematic elements within the context of literary and cultural movements.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 300: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 3305: Introduction to Literary Studies
Introduces students to a broad range of key concepts, movements, and figures associated with literary theory and criticism.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
ENGL 300: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 4660 Criticism Theory & Practice
Introduces students to a broad range of key concepts, movements, and figures associated with literary theory and criticism.
Prerequisite: ENGL110
ENGL 317: Studies in Fiction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 2340 Introduction to Fiction
Detailed study of the short story and its evolution. Works by European, English, and American writers.
ENGL 318: Studies in Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GL 2227 LE Modern Greek Cinema - Level 4
Introduction to Modern Greek cinema through an analysis of the theoretical, historical and aesthetic elements that have shaped its identity.
ENGL 338: Studies in Victorian Fiction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 4429 The Victorian World
Studies of significant British texts from the nineteenth century, the social forces they shaped, and those by which they were shaped. Content varies by expertise of instructor.
Crosslisted with WOMS337
ENGL 340: American Literature to the Civil War (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 2222 The Making of America: American Literature to 1865
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ENGL 341: American Literature from the Civil War to WWII (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 3323 (Re)Writing America: Realism to Modernism
ENGL 347: Studies in American Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 4468 American Romanticism
Special topics, ranging from the beginnings to contemporary American literature; may include studies in a single author or authors (e.g., the detective stories of Poe) or period and genre studies (e.g., the Harlem Renaissance or the humor of the old southwest). Variable content.
Crosslisted with AFRA347.
ENGL 365: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 4453 Shakespeare: The Great Tragedies
Particular areas or writers to be announced.
Restrictions: Cannot be substituted for ENGL324: Shakespeare
Crosslisted with JWST365
ENGL 371: Studies in Fiction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 2340 Introduction to Fiction
Detailed study of the short story and its evolution. Works by European, English, and American writers.
ENGL 372: Studies in Drama (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 2244 Perspectives on Drama
A theme-based approach to drama, with emphasis on the ways in which cultural and theoretical contexts shape literary techniques and performance traditions.
ENGL 373: Studies in Poetry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GL 2221 Modern Greek Poetry
Survey of modern Greek poetry from the nineteenth century to the present. Major literary trends: romanticism, symbolism, surrealism. Emphasis on specific poets: Solomos, Palamas, Cavafis, Sikelianos, Seferis, Elytis.
ENTR 267: Introduction to Entrepreneurship Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 2062 Introduction to Entrepreneurship Management
The significance of entrepreneurship to an economy. Theory and practice of entrepreneurship in start-ups and in established organizations. Entrepreneurial behaviours and challenges.
ENTR 367: Corporate Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 3019 Corporate Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Managing innovation in start-ups and in existing organizations. Skills for introducing, analyzing, and managing the offering of break-through products and services. Practical application of innovation inside corporations.
ENWC 167: Conservation of Wildlife and Mediterranean Ecosystems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ES 4126 Conservation of Wildlife and Mediterranean Ecosystems
An analysis of terrestrial, aquatic and marine Mediterranean ecosystems and wildlife with emphasis on endangered and protected species, conservation and management techniques.
ENWC 167: Seminar: Conversation of Wildlife & Mediterranean Ecosystems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ES 4126 Conservation of Wildlife and Mediterranean Ecosystems - Level 6
An analysis of terrestrial, aquatic and marine Mediterranean ecosystems and wildlife with emphasis on endangered and protected species, conservation and management techniques.
FINC 311: Principles of Finance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FN 3005 Foundations of Corporate Finance
Introduces fundamental techniques and concepts related to the financial management of business firms. Topics include the time value of money, valuation, capital budgeting, working capital management, cost of capital, capital structure analysis, short and long term financing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 207 and MATH 201. PREREQ for HRIM majors: ACCT 207 and MATH 201 or STAT 200
Restrictions: Not open to Freshmen. Open to students whose major requires this course.
FREN 105: French I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 1000: French I
Introduction to the French language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
FREN 106: French II - Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 1101: French II
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: FREN105
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Two to three years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
FREN 107: French III - Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 2202 French III
Intermediate French. Review of French grammar and syntax. More complex aspects of French structure. Readings and discussion in French. Aspects of French civilization, history, social development and the arts.
Prerequisite: FREN 106
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: Satisfies College of Arts and Sciences language requirement.
Restrictions: Four years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
FREN 250: Introduction to Business French (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 2210 Business French
Familiarizes students with characteristics of business French (terminology, syntactical patterns, etc.) and policies and practices of the French business community.
Prerequisite: Any 200-level course taught in the French language.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
GEOG 230: Human Impact on the Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ES 1000: Environmental Science: Ecosystems & Biodiversity
Provides an introduction to the past, present, and future impacts of humans on Earth. Topics include anthropogenic impacts on vegetation, animals, soils, water, landforms, and the atmosphere, and possible future impacts as a result of global change. Particular attention is paid to the interconnections among environmental systems and the influence of human activities.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
GEOG 235: Conservation of Natural Resources (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ES 1005: Contemporary Environmental Issues
Physical, social and economic problems involved in integrating resource management and maintaining environmental quality.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
GEOG 372: Introduction to GIS (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GG 3115: Geographic Information Systems - Level 5
Fundamental geographic concepts and principles necessary to effectively use GIS to examine geographic problems. Hands-on training is provided in the use of professional GIS software in the context of collecting, managing, processing, analysis and presenting geographic data. Emphases is placed on the nature of spatial data, modeling techniques, spatial analysis and cartographic design.
GEOL 105: Geological Hazards & their Human Impact (+ GEOL 115 Hazards Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GG 1000: Environmental Geology
Geological processes and events that adversely affect humans and civilization. Methods for predicting and dealing with geological hazards. May be taken with a 1 credit lab, GEOL 115 Geological Hazards Laboratory: Laboratory investigation of environmental geological processes and their impact on society: earthquakes, volcanoes, coastal hazards, rivers and streams, groundwater. Identification of earth materials and study of earth processes using topographical, geological and tectonic maps.
Prerequisite: COREQ: GEOL 105
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
GEOL 167: Seminar: An Introduction to Earth & Space Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ES 1007/SC 1007: An Introduction to Earth & Space Science
An introduction to earth and planetary science; a study of earth systems and their interactions as driving forces for the earth's evolution. The structure and composition of the earth systems, the formation of the solar system, stars and galaxies are discussed.
Listed as ES 1007 in fall & SC 1007 in Spring. ACG syllabus matches UD GEOL113 Earth Science but lacks laboratory component, so equates to 3-credit elective course.
GREK 101: Introduction to Ancient Greek (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 1002 Ancient Greek I
An introductory course for students who wish to study elementary ancient Greek. The course covers the essentials of vocabulary, grammar and syntax through oral and written exercises so that students can begin to translate ancient Greek into English. Practice in reading, writing and translating from ancient Greek into English, with excerpts from Greek literature.
GREK 102: Elementary Ancient Greek II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 1103 Ancient Greek Language II
Completion of elementary Greek.
Prerequisite: GREK 101 or equivalent.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
HDFS 220: Child Development I: Prenatal to Age 3 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 2207: Developmental Psychology: The Preschool Years
Study of prenatal development and the physical, perceptual, social-emotional, and cognitive-language developmental domains of children birth to three. Emphasis on nurturing relationships and understanding child development within cultural contexts of children’s families. Directed observation in infant/toddler settings.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
HDFS 316: Learning and Development in HRA (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 3118 Developing Human Capital - Level 5
Introduction to workplace principles of coaching and training practices, employee skill assessment and performance management, and how to motivate staff, facilitate training sessions and cultivate interpersonal relationships from a team context.

The role of developing human capital in achieving corporate objectives, through effective needs assessment, employee development plans and career management. Evaluation of the training and development effort, learning theories and e-learning.
HDFS 428: Diversity and Inclusion in Human Relations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 4017 Managing Workforce Diversity
Examination of diversity and inclusion practices and related legal issues in human relations and industry; focus on historical foundations and designing and assessing inclusive policies to address personnel and business needs.
HIST 101-000: Europe and the World I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 1000: Survey of Western Civilization
Europe from the ancient Near East to the Age of Discoveries. Social, cultural, and economic interactions within Europe and with the wider world through religion, conquest, and trade.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 102: Europe & the World II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 1001: Survey of Western Civilization II
The transformations of Europe since the middle of the 17th century through cultural, social, and economic developments, revolutions, wars, and interactions with other parts of the world.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 254: The Jewish Holocaust 1933-1945 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 3036: Modern European Antisemitism & the Holocaust
This course emphasizes the rise of Modern Antisemitism starting with the French Revolution and continuing to the climax of the Holocaust. The course is focused on Hitler's Antisemitism and the path to the Holocaust.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Crosslisted as JWST 254
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Alexander III, the Great (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 3021 Alexander III, the Great - Level 5
Analysis of the times and achievements of one of the most controversial personalities of the Ancient World.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Students cannot enroll in multiple HIST 339 sections within the same semester
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Byzantium (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 2023: Byzantium
Survey of Byzantine history from late Antiquity, the reign of Constantine the Great (A.D. 337) and until the fall of Constantinople to Ottoman rule (A.D. 1453). The birth of the Middle Ages Eastern Empire, its development and its influence in the Balkans, Eastern and Western Europe, as well as in the Near and Middle East and its gradual decline and final fall.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Students cannot enroll in multiple HIST 339 sections within the same semester
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Cyprus and the Near East (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 3019 Cyprus and the Near East - Level 5
A critical survey of the origins of the Cyprus question largely from a United Nations perspective, in conjunction with policies in Turkey.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Students cannot enroll in multiple HIST 339 sections within the same semester
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Greece: The Birth of a Modern Nation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 3060 Greece: The Birth of a Modern Nation
Historical, political and cultural developments in Greece from the Revolution to the age of Venizelos. The birth and building of themodern Greek state. This course is fundamental for all students who are interested to learn how Greece won its independence from the Ottoman rule and succeeded in creating a modern European state.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Students cannot enroll in multiple HIST 339 sections within the same semester
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Maritime History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MG 2060: Maritime History
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries. The emphasis when taught in Newark is on particular aspects of European history distinct from national narratives. The syllabi are typically complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites when taught abroad. Topics vary but often focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place. When offered on this program, the course content is a historical dimension of the development of international and Greek shipping in modern times. The transition from sail to stream and the beginning of modern fleets. Characteristics of global shipping before and after World War II, and the development of the modern Greek and Greek-owned fleet since the last quarter of the 20th century. Classes consist of lectures, discussions, case study analyses, possible field trips and the carrying of a major research project.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Middle East: A Crossroad (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 3026 Middle East: A Crossroad
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries. The emphasis when taught in Newark is on particular aspects of European history distinct from national narratives. The syllabi are typically complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites when taught abroad. Topics vary but often focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place. When offered on this program, the course content is a survey of the history of the Middle East focusing on the Late Ottoman and Modern times and offering a critical analysis of the ongoing conflicts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
HIST 339: Topics in European History: Modern Greece: A Troubled History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 3061 Modern Greece: A Troubled History
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, with a focus or theme that touches on one or more countries. The emphasis when taught in Newark is on particular aspects of European history distinct from national narratives. The syllabi are typically complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites when taught abroad. Topics vary but often focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place. When offered on this program, the course content is developments in Greece from the Balkan Wars and the National Schism to the present. Particular attention paid to the role of Greece in the two world wars, the causes and consequences of the Civil War and the Dictatorship of 1967-1974 and the nature of the restored democracy after the fall of the junta.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
HIST 339: Topics in European History: The Archeology of Daily Life (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 1002: The Archeology of Daily Life
A study of daily life in ancient Athens and Rome through the analysis of archaeological evidence. Survey of all facets of life. Public and private spaces and structures. Government, customs, festivals and entertainment. This course will enable students to understand values, attitudes and living conditions in Greek and Roman societies through the examination of material evidence.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Students cannot enroll in multiple HIST 339 sections within the same semester
HIST 340: Ancient Near East & Greece (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 2034: History of Ancient Greece
The history of the ancient Greek world from the rise of the polis to the coming of Rome.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 340: Ancient Near East & Greece: Pausanias & the Archaeology of Greece (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 2019 Pausanias & the Archaeology of Greece
A detailed examination of Pausanias, the second-century AD traveller and writer, who has proved to be our most important literary source for the art and archaeology of Archaic, Classical & Roman Greece.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 340: Ancient Near East and Greece (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 2034 History of Ancient Greece
Stresses such themes as the way in which the world view of the ancients was different from ours, and the relationship between the individual and society. Readings in ancient historical works and ancient literature. Extensive use of slides.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 396: Topics in World History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY 4032 Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of the world, attending to the structures and systems of global connectivity. The emphasis when taught in Newark is on particular aspects of world history distinct from national narratives. Topics are typically complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites when taught abroad.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 399: Topics in European History: The Spartans (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HY The Spartans - Level 5
The society, culture and history of ancient Sparta.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HOSP 214: Issues in Tourism Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HT 1001: Introduction to the Tourism & Hospitality Industry
Examines the scope and organization of the tourism industry, motivations for travel, and the management of micro and macro tourism resources. Economic,social, political and environmental impact of tourism are considered alongwith the issue of sustainable development within the industry. Introduction to the study of tourism and the nature and scope of the Tourism and Hospitality industries. When offered on this program, the course topics include: Origins and growth of tourism, tourism as a global phenomenon, demand and supply of tourism, the Greek tourism industry and its role in the Greek economy, the structure of the tourism industry and future prospects for Greek and international tourism.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
HOSP 267: Hospitality Information Systems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HT 2116 Hospitality Information Systems
The application and use of information systems in the hospitality industry. Support of tourism and hospitality operations through a front-desk management system; management of reservation, booking and rental processes through a Computer Reservation System (CRS) solution.
HOSP 367: Marketing in Tourism and Hospitality (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HT 3115 Marketing in Tourism and Hospitality
A managerial approach to hospitality and tourism marketing. Examines the implications of the Tourism and Hospitality industry on the Marketing theory. The 7-Ps approach (product, price, place, promotion, people, processes, physical evidence).
HOSP 381: Management of Food and Beverage Operations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HT 3118 Food and Beverage Management
Management tools available to control sales and expenses in food and beverage operations. Analysis of centers of responsibility. Cost management approach to development of control systems.
Prerequisite: HOSP 321
ITAL 105: Italian I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 1000 Italian I
Introduction to the Italian language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Breadth Requirement
ITAL 106: Italian II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 1101 Italian II
Completion of basic Italian. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: ITAL 105.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Two to three years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
ITAL 107: Italian III - Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 2202 Italian III
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, reading texts of average difficulty.
Prerequisite: ITAL 106.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement.
Restrictions: Four years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
LATN 102: Elementary Latin I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 1115 Latin II
Completion of elementary Latin.
Prerequisite: LATN 101 or equivalent
Restrictions: One year of high school Latin acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
LLCU 167: Modern Greek II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GR 1101 Modern Greek II
The course develops student`s listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Modern Greek language at the A1+ Level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). Students acquire the ability to understand main points of simple narrative or informational texts on familiar topics, and communicate in a large variety of formal/informal everyday interactions in a Greek-speaking environment.
LLCU 167: Seminar: Greek Language through Contemporary Themes (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GL 2205 Greek Language through Contemporary Themes
The course develops students' awareness of Greek culture today. It focuses on contemporary life in Greece while paying attention to aspects of the past that have a relevance to Greek reality at present. Culture provides the context for developing students' language competence from level A2+ to level B1 of the Common European Reference for Languages (CEFR).
LLCU 167: Seminar: Modern Greek III (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GL 2202 Modern Greek III
The course develops student`s listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Modern Greek language at the A2 Level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). Students acquire the ability to understand elementary-level narrative or expository texts, and communicate with ease in a large variety of formal/informal everyday interactions in a Greek-speaking environment.
LLCU 167: Seminar: Modern Greek IV (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GL 2303 Modern Greek IV
The course develops student`s listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Modern Greek language at the A2+ Level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). Students acquire the ability to understand a broad range of lower-intermediate-level narrative or expository texts, and communicate with relative fluency in a large variety of formal/informal everyday interactions in a Greek-speaking environment.
LLCU 167: Seminar: Modern Greek Language (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GR 1000: Modern Greek I
The course develops student`s listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Modern Greek language at the A1 Level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
LLCU 316: Classical Mythology: Gods, Heroes & Monsters (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 1004: Myth in the Ancient Greek & Roman World
Cosmological myths and heroic sagas in the literature and art of Greece and Rome. The influence of the mythology in later art and literature. When offered on this program, the course introduces students to the rich world of Greek and Roman mythology by examining and assessing their appearance in literature and material culture. The contribution of these mythologies to the construction of identity and ideologies of the Greeks and Romans will be considered.

Crosslisted: May be crosslisted with CMLT 316.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
LLCU 322: Topics: Classical Literature in Translation: Classical Greek Literature & Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 3022 Classical Greek Literature & Culture
Special topics in Greek and Roman culture and civilization. Particular areas and writers to be announced, e.g., ancient epic, ancient drama, Greek literature in translation. When offered on this program, the course content is a study, in English translation, of some of the most important works of Greek literature, placing them within their cultural context. Samples from various genres (epic and lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, rhetoric and history).
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 322: Topics: Classical Literature in Translation: Greek & Roman Epic Literature in Translation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 2010 Greek & Roman Epic Literature in Translation
Special topics in Greek and Roman culture and civilization. Particular areas and writers to be announced, e.g., ancient epic, ancient drama, Greek literature in translation. When offered on this program, the course content is a Survey of Greek and Roman epic poetry in translation, including works by Homer and Hesiod and Virgil. Consideration of translations and other traditions of epic.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 330: Topics: World Literatures and Cultures: Poverty as Spectacle from the Odyssey to the Greek Crisis (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HHU 2208 LE Poverty as Spectacle from the Odyssey to the Greek Crisis
This course explores the ways in which poverty is not only represented but also constructed in/through various media, ranging from ancient literary texts to social history, political theory, and contemporary film. It seeks to enquire into the preconditions and cultural assumptions that inform representations of poverty, with special emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
MAST 200: The Oceans (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: OC 1001 Life in the Oceans
Principles of chemical and biological oceanography with emphasis on chemical and biological processes, the properties and origin of water and salts, major constituents, dissolved gases and nutrients, the carbon dioxide system, coastal processes, the biological productivity of the oceans, ecology, distribution and classification of marine organisms, ocean resources and ocean pollution.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Students must also enroll in UNIV 167 to receive 4 credits
MATH 115-000: Pre-Calculus (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 1108: College Algebra
The various classes of functions and their graphs are explored. Functionclasses include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential,logarithmic and trigonometric. Skills and concepts needed for calculus (MATH221) are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Requires a grade of C- or better in MATH 010 or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placement Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement for more information.
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Only four credits from any combination of MATH 113, MATH 114, MATH115, MATH 117, MATH 127, and MATH 231 can count toward graduation.
MATH 210: Discrete Mathematics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITC 3106 Mathematics for Computing
Elements of sets and logic. Relations, functions. Integers. Induction and recursion. Principles and techniques of counting. Graphs. Paths and circuits.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 or MATH 242
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
MATH 221-000: Calculus I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 2205: Applied Calculus; MA 2105 Applied Calculus - Level 4; MA 2130 Calculus I - Level 4
Topics include functions, graphing functions, limits, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration, and techniques of integration. Business applications are emphasized.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: MATH 115, or MATH 117 or an acceptable score (determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences) on the Math Placement Exam. More information on the Math Placement Exam is available at https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Only four credits from any combination of MATH 221, MATH 231, and MATH 241 can count towards graduation.
MATH 230: Finite Mathematics with Applications (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 1001 Finite Mathematics
Straight lines. Systems of first order linear equations. First order linear inequalities. Graphical solution of first order linear inequalities. Graphical solution of linear optimization problems. Simple and compound interest. Future and present values. Sets and counting techniques. Introduction to Probability theory
MATH 267: Seminar: Applied Statistics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 2021 Applied Statistics
Organizing and summarizing data. Probability distributions: binomial, Poisson, normal, t-distribution, chi-square. Sampling and sampling distribution of the mean. The central limit theorem. Parametric tests for one mean and for the difference between two means. Test for independence of two qualitative/categorical variables. Simple and multiple correlation and regression.
MATH 267: Seminar: Statistics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 2010 Statistics I
Organizing and summarizing data. Probability distributions: binomial, Poisson, normal, t-distribution, chi-square. Sampling and sampling distribution of the mean. The central limit theorem. The course is not open to students who has previously completed an MA-course in statistics.
MUSC 101: Appreciation of Music (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MU 1000: Listening to Music
Introduction to Western music literature through a nontechnical presentation of various musical styles and forms. This course aims to develop student's musical knowledge and listening skills through the examination of musical genres and diverse examples of musical practice in varied social, cultural, and historical contexts. Students will learn about the ethical qualities attributed to music over time and what music might mean in varied contexts and through extra-musical association.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Not open to music majors.
MUSC 205: Music of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MU 1038 Music Around the World
The study of the music in representative cultures outside the Western European tradition through the approach of music as art and its relationship to culture and society.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
NTDT 200: Nutrition Concepts (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BMS 3425 Human Nutrition
An integrated overview of the physiological requirements and functions of major nutrients for humans, the connection between nutrition and disease, the role of nutrients in growth and health through the life cycle and in physical activity, dietary requirements, as well as issues of food safety, food security and contemporary challenges of nutrition and the food system.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
NTDT 200: Nutrition Concepts (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PE 1004: Nutrition
Functions and sources of nutrients, dietary adequacy, energy balance and metabolism with emphasis on health promotion. Includes weight control, evaluation of popular diets, vegetarianism, eating disorders, alcohol, other current issues and concerns in nutrition.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHIL 102-000: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 1000: Introduction to Philosophy
An examination of such central philosophical problems as ethics, theories of knowledge, the nature of reality, philosophy of religion and political philosophy.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 105: Critical Thinking (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 1001 Practical Reasoning
Emphasis on developing skill at logical criticism of arguments. Topics include informal fallacies, deceiving with statistics, the role of definitions in reasoning, the importance of evidence and confirmation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 167: Philosophy Seminar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 2215 Religion in the Mediterranean World
An overview of three major religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The influence of these religions on Mediterranean cultures, especially Greece. Religion considered as having a major impact on cultural heritage and civilization in the Mediterranean world. Site and museum visits also included.
PHIL 200: Business Ethics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 3005
Ethical theory applied to moral problems in business. Corporate social responsibility, and ethical issues in advertising, personnel and investment.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 203: Ethics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 3010 Ethics
Study of moral value, moral obligation and moral virtue through comparison of notable schools of ethical theory, including utilitarianism, existentialism, Kantianism, classical Greek eudaimonism, pragmatism and Thomism.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 301: Ancient Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 2020 Greek Philosophy - Level 4
At the birth of philosophy, the Presocratic thinkers form our conception of nature, knowledge and man. Examination of their influence on science and philosophy. Comparative study of the views of Socrates and those of the Sophists. Thematic review of ancient Greek thought from Plato’s early dialogues, to Neoplatonism.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
PHYS 144: Concepts of the Universe (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 1000 Introduction to Astronomy
This introductory course in astronomy unveils the wonders of the Cosmos such as solar systems and planets, origin and evolution of stars and galaxies, and various cosmological theories. It gives emphasis on modern developments of astronomy and its connections to everyday life.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Not for credit to students who have taken PHYS 133.
POSC 240: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IR 2010: Introduction to International Relations
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 309: Political Culture by Country: What It Means to be Greek: Perspectives of Greek Identity and Nationhood (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HHU 2219 What it Means to be Greek: Perspectives of Greek Identity and Nationhood
A historical treatment of the evolving ideas of Greekness from the Greek revolution to the present. The course explores changing notions of Greek identity articulated by both Greeks and non-Greeks. Focusing on different texts, from historical documents and literary works as well as films and electronic media, the course helps students explore different perspectives on Greek identity, articulated by both Greeks and non-Greeks. As a result, students develop awareness of the contingent and shifting nature of Greekness, and reflect on the ideological significance of representations of Greekness, both within and outside Greece.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
POSC 339: European Union (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 3232 The European Union
The European Union is an economic and political union that binds together twenty-seven European countries. This course provides an overview of the history, institutions, policies and controversies surrounding the European Union.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
POSC 362-000: Diplomacy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PO 2004: Diplomacy
Diplomacy is the art of formal representation and policy implementation. Diplomats need to understand complex material and represent positions in an effective manner. These skills are applicable in a variety of contexts. Readings, discussions, cases and simulations are used to introduce diplomatic skills. When offered on this program, the course content is a critical survey of world diplomacy, from the time of Cardinal Richelieu to American exceptionalism, with emphasis on the twentieth century and contemporary diplomacy.
POSC 409: Topics in World Politics: Global Markets & Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IR 3017 Global Markets & Politics
Topics in world politics. Topics will vary. When offered on this program, the course content is an overview of recent developments in global economics and politics with special reference to emerging economic and political crises, areas of actual and potential political distress and societal disruption, and the ways the latter will potentially impact the future. The challenges to democratic and effective political leadership posed by current and potential future trends.
POSC 409-000: Topics in World Politics: International Relations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PO 3031: International Relations
Topics in world politics. Topics will vary. When offered on this program, the course content is the international system of states. Nature and limitations of international law. Factors affecting prestige and power. Balance of power and balance of fear. War and diplomacy. Cultural relations in historical perspective.
Restrictions: Offered only in conjunction with travel abroad programs. May be taken twice for credit when countries vary.
POSC 409-000: Topics in World Politics: Political Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PO 2001: Political Behavior
Topics in world politics. Topics will vary. When offered on this program, the course contents are: culture and institutionalized forms of political action. Social movements and revolutions. Parties and pressure groups. Electoral behavior. Leadership. Public opinion.
POSC 419: International Relations History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IR 2015 Modern European History & Politics
Presents and examines key themes in the history of international relations across time and the globe (Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas) like development of a states system and sovereignty, patterns in the practices of war and peace, and development of key institutions of international relations. When offered on this program, the course content is an introduction to the Political, Social and Economic History of Modern Europe (from the Treaty of Westphalia - 1648 - to contemporary times). A thematic approach emphasising the political developments and changes.
PSYC 167: History of Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 2010 History of Psychology
This course reviews the advancement of psychological thought, inquiry and practice, by engaging students with the historical development of contemporary paradigms. Ever-increasing specialization in the field can make it challenging to discern the common roots from which the field of psychology has evolved. The course examines the 'shared past', which will provide a context for understanding the intellectual history of psychology and how it developed into the discipline we know today.
PSYC 167: Psychology as a Natural Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 1000 Psychology as a Natural Science
Overview of psychology as a natural science. Foundations and contemporary perspectives in psychology, research methods and ethical principles, biological foundations of behaviour, perceptual and sensory systems, states of consciousness, learning and memory, thought and language processes, motivation and emotion.
PSYC 167: Psychology as a Social Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 1001 Psychology as a Social Science
Overview of the field of psychology as a social science with emphasis on: theoretical perspectives and research methods, life-span development, mental abilities, personality theory and assessment, stress and coping, psychological disorders and treatment, social behaviour.
PSYC 207: Research Methods (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 3618 Research Methods in Psychology
Reviews the major issues involved in the design of psychological experiments. Includes measurement issues, internal and external validity of experiments, research with single subjects, and research ethics. Discusses both laboratory and field research.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in PSYC 100 or NSCI 100.
Restrictions: Open to PSYC and NSCI majors and minors.
PSYC 209: Measurement and Statistics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 2047 Analysis of Behavioral Data
Theory and the application of statistical techniques to psychological data. When offered on this program, the course content is a comprehensive coverage of fundamental aspects in probability and statistics. Analysis of behavioral data with graphs, descriptive and inferential statistics. Interpretation of research findings from graphs, parametric and non-parametric tests. The use of SPSS statistical software constitutes an integral part of teaching and learning. Laboratory sessions complement the lectures.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in PSYC 100 or NSCI 100 and one course in basic college mathematics.
PSYC 312: Learning and Motivation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 2236 Human Learning and Memory
Experimental study of contemporary theories of learning and motivation. This course is an empirical and theoretical examination of the processes of learning and memory. For learning the focus is on habituation, classical and operant conditioning and behaviorist approaches. Although, most of the research findings come from animal experiments, the relevance of these findings and concepts to understanding human behavior are discussed. For memory the focus is primarily on human memory. Students are introduced to the empirical and theoretical examination of the process of memory, regarding the mechanisms of acquiring, storing and retrieving information.
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- or better in PSYC 207 and PSYC 209 or its substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
For Neuroscience Majors and Minors: minimum grade of C- in PSYC 209 or its substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301) only.
Restrictions: Open to PSYC and NSCI majors and minors.
PSYC 325: Child Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 3608 Developmental Psychology:  Childhood and Adolescence
Survey of the interactions of physiological, psychological, and environmental factors determining psychological development. Consideration of major theories of child development. Integrated presentation of theory and research, focusing on normal, physical, cognitive, social and personality development from the age of six through adolescence.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 325: Child Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 2207 Developmental Psychology:  The Preschool Years
Survey of the interactions of physiological, psychological, and environmental factors determining psychological development. Consideration of major theories of child development. Theoretical approaches and methodological issues, biocultural foundations of development, prenatal development and birth, physical, cognitive and socioemotional development in infancy and early childhood. Emphasis on ecological and contextual perspective on development and on the practical implications of developmental science.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
PSYC 340: Cognition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4839 Cognition
Examination of how the mind works, covering topics such as perception, vision, attention, memory, language, concepts and decision making. Major themes include understanding the mind/brain relationship, using empirical data to develop and evaluate cognitive theories, and understanding the implications of cognitive research for everyday life.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207 and in PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301), except for Neuroscience majors.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
PSYC 367: Childhood and Adolescence Psychopathology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4943 Childhood and Adolescence Psychopathology
Comprehensive and critical evaluation of theories and research on the etiology of different types of psychopathology in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Applications of psychometric tests and assessment, and evidence-based treatment and prevention programs.
PSYC 367: Experimental Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 3734 Experimental Cognitive Psychology
This course introduces students to experimental methodology, advanced statistical analysis, interpretation and presentation of data, writing of experimental reports. In addition students go through the research process following ethical principles of research. Laboratory sessions complement the lectures.
PSYC 367: Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4849 Forensic Psychology
A systematic examination of the applications of psychology to legal issues including criminal profiling, insanity defence, competency to stand trial, commitment to and release from mental institutions, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, expert witness testimony as well as child custody disputes.
PSYC 367: Introduction to Counseling Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4754 Introduction to Counseling Psychology
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the field of counselling psychology. The course utilizes a scientist/practitioner approach to familiarize students with the assumptions, theories, strategies, applications, and ethical and legal considerations related to counselling psychology. This course is not designed to teach students how to conduct psychotherapy.
PSYC 367: Psychology of Addiction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4744 Psychology of Addiction
The course aims at providing a model for understanding the psychological and biological aspects of addiction and addictive behaviours. It covers, the neurobiological mechanisms associated with consciousness altering substances, the social, cultural and psychological perspectives on addictive behaviours. Students will be familiarized with diagnostic criteria for alcohol and substance use disorders utilizing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fifth Addition (DSM-5) as well as to more continuum models of assessing addictions, The course focuses also on other non substance related forms of addiction, like gambling, sex addiction, internet addiction and the addictive features of feeding and eating disorders Other factors that may contribute to the development of addictive behaviours, like personality traits or family characteristics, are also examined.
PSYC 367: Stress and Coping (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4723 Stress and Coping
Integrative approach to the scientific study of the causes, symptoms and consequences of stress. Theoretical and practical concepts to the study of stress are examined, with an outlook to stress management techniques. Success and failing of coping mechanisms are referred to. Adjustments in the areas of interpersonal relationships, school and college life and in the workplace are examined.
PSYC 367: Testing and Assessment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 3632 Testing and Assessment
Comprehensive knowledge of the theory and practice of psychological testing and assessment. Statistical analysis and in-depth understanding of the psychometric properties of tests. Evaluation of achievement, intelligence, cognitive, neuropsychological and personality tests. Application of testing and assessment in various applied settings. Laboratory practice sessions complements the lectures.
PSYC 370: Research in Personality (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 3612 Theories of Personality
An analysis of contemporary issues and research in personality including the assessment of personality traits, the personality situation interaction and the social and biological bases of individual differences.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207, and PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
PSYC 380: Psychopathology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4751 Abnormal Psychology
Exploration of research on diagnosis, etiology and treatment of major pathological disorders. Emphasis on original research articles, class discussion and assessment instruments, in addition to analysis of video-taped interviews with patients used to illustrate the disorders.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207, and PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
PSYC 390: Social Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 3626 Social Psychology
An analysis of theory and research in social psychology including the topics of social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal, group and intergroup relations. Student-designed research projects including data analysis.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC 207, and PSYC 209 or substitutes (MATH 202, MATH 205, STAT 200, SOCI 301).
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
PSYC 432: Advanced Health Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4719 Health Psychology
This course is an introduction to the field of clinical health psychology, focusing on the biopsychosocial model of health. The topics include stress and coping, cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
Prerequisite: Minimum grades of C- in PSYC207 and PSYC209 or its substitutes (MATH202, MATH205, SOCI301, STAT200).
Restrictions: Open to PSYC majors and minors only.
PSYC 467: Diversity and Social Interaction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 2257 Diversity and Social Interaction
This course studies the Psychology of Diversity and social interaction in contemporary times. A comprehensive coverage of basic theories and current research on Diversity is presented, explaining how and why a broad range of social differences influence attitudes, behavior, experiences and social interactions. The origins and forms of stereotypes and prejudice are examined, implications of stigma and social inequalities are discussed, in addition to addressing a variety of preventative and interventions strategies at the individual and societal level.
PSYC 467: Seminar:  Hot Topics in Neuropsychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 4965 Seminar:  Hot Topics in Neuropsychology
Neuropsychology is a field of study that endeavors to define the relationship between brain processes and aspects of human psychological functioning. Historically, the main source of data in neuropsychology has been the study of behavior after brain damage or the presence of neurodegenerative disorder. The power of a neuropsychological approach is revealed not only into the difficulties experienced by people with brain damage, but into psychological disorders as diverse as learning disabilities, depression, schizophrenia, and personality disorders.
SCEN 167: Physical Science Special Problem (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PY 1000: Introduction to Physics I
Fundamental principles, including matter in motion, energy and momentum, solids and fluids, thermal physics and heat.
SOCI 201: Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SO 1000: Introduction to Sociology
An overview of the sociological perspective of the study of society, social organization and social institutions with special emphasis on the social causes and consequences of human behavior.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 209: Social Problems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: Social Problems
Poverty, racism, drugs, unemployment, homelessness, family violence, mental illness, anti–social behavior, terrorism and collective violence. Why are these problems social? How are they given meaning and what are the implications of such meaning? What are their social causes? Conflicts between sociological perspectives. What are the implications of social problems for social policy?
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 215: Race in Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AN 2007 Ethnicity and Identity
Examination of the social construction of race and its importance in institutions and social identify. History of race in the United States, including access to rights and privileges and how groups worked for racial equality. and how race structures relationships among diverse groups in society. Includes analysis of rights and privileges denied or extended to groups and how disadvantaged groups work towards racial equality.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
May be crosslisted with AFRA215.
SOCI 267: Social Inequality (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SO 2004 Social Inequality
Causes and consequences of social inequality, including theoretical background, social classes, and social mobility, illustrated through various substantive cases.
SOCI 311: Sociology of Health & Illness (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SO 3007 LE Health and Society - Level 5
Medical Sociology and contrasting Ideas about Health and Social Behavior. Epidemiological Measures and Complexity of Modern Ills. Health in relation to Age, Gender, Race, Socio-economic status, Social Stress, Health and Illness Behavior as well as Healing Options in American Society. The Sick Role, Doctor-Patient Interaction, the role of Physicians, Nurses, Midwives. The Development of Hospitals, their organization and the rising cost of Health Care Delivery. Health Care Delivery in the USA, the First world and Formerly Socialist Countries as well as in other countries.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 367: Migration and the Global Age (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SO 3035 Migration and the Global Age - Level 5
Migration flows in the 21st century. The impact of major trends like globalization and transnationalism. Emphasis on assimilation/integration and multiculturalism, inclusion and exclusion, ethnic and racial minorities, citizenship, migrant associations and networks, gender and labor. Migration in Greece, the EU, the US. Use of recent research and theory by Portes, Gans, Levitt, Cohen, Castles, Morawska, Vertovec, etc.
SOCI 367: Seminar: Environment & Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SO 3002 LE Environment and Society - Level 5
The study of the interactions between the physical environment, social organization and social behavior. Focus on both local and global dimensions of social behaviors and their environmental impact.
SPAN 105-000: Spanish I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SN 1000: Spanish I
Introduction to the Spanish language and a development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: No Spanish background, two or fewer years of high school Spanish.
SPAN 106-000: Spanish II - Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SN 1101: Spanish II
Completion of basic Spanish. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: SPAN105; Two to three years of high school Spanish acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
SPAN 107: Spanish III - Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SN 2202 Spanish III
The four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are further developed to handle the language with a certain degree of confidence and independence using a wider range of vocabulary in every day, social, working and academic context. Issues of culture, history and daily life in Spain and Latin America. (B1)
SPTM 167-070: Special Problem - Introduction to Sport Management (3 credits) pass/fail
Provider Equivalent: SM 2001 - Introduction to Sport Management
Introduction to sport management; definition and history of sport, the social and cultural dimension of sport, the sport industry including sport media and sports events, the main functions of sport management and legal and ethical issues in sport; professional, amateur and community sports.
SPTM 418: Sport Event and Facility Management: Olympic Games & Sports Mega Events (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SM 3003 Olympic Games & Sports Mega Events
Management of sport events and facilities, including sponsorship acquisition, marketing and promotions, volunteer management, budgeting, participant registration, facility design, and event and facility operations. When offered on this program, the course content is planning, development, and operational aspects of sports mega events. Concepts of personnel issues, event and facility management, marketing, promotion, leadership, budgeting, fundraising, ethics, as well as the sociological, economic, and political significance of bids for, and the hosting of, sports mega events. Olympic Games, their historical development and their evolution to modern Olympics.
Restrictions: Open only to junior/senior sport management majors.
SPTM 418: Sport Event and Facility Management:Sports Operations and Facilities Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SM 3005 Sports Operations and Facilities Management
Management of sport events and facilities, including sponsorship acquisition, marketing and promotions, volunteer management, budgeting, participant registration, facility design, and event and facility operations. When offered on this program, the course content is planning, development, and maintenance of sport and leisure facilities, including latest trends in international sports facilities and operations, and respective managerial aspects.
Restrictions: Open only to junior/senior sport management majors.
THEA 104: Introduction to Theatre & Drama (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DR 2003: Making of Theater
Survey of the elements of theatre and drama. Includes attendance at theatrical productions, readings of representative plays, discussion of a method of dramatic analysis, explanation of staging in periods of major importance and discussion of the actor, the designer and the director.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
THEA 104: Introduction to Theatre and Drama (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DR 2126 Performance in Athens
Trends in national and international theatre, dance and performance encountered through attendance of performances taking place in Athens. Students discuss and analyze performances in the class.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: ACG's DR 2003 & DR 2126 are equivalent to THEA 104. UD students can only take one of the two courses.
THEA 167: Seminar: Theatre Improvisation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DR 1024 Theatre Improvisation
Exploring aspects of human behavior on stage using theatrical improvisation.
THEA 204: Introduction to Voice & Speech (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DR 2015 Voice & Speech I
The voice as a principal means of communication in the theatre as well as in everyday life. An exploration of mental and emotional aspects of vocal expression. A deeper understanding of the body?s function in voice production.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
UNIV 373-034: Study Abroad: Athens, Greece (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
In order to be prepared to apply for their Greek visa, by October 1 all applicants must have a passport valid six months after the program's end date.

The semester in Athens is designed for undergraduate sophomores, juniors, and seniors regardless of major with a minimum 2.8 grade point average at the time of application. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please email a copy of your official transcript to the Program Coordinator.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Spring Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,400.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and CGPS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in mid-October.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early January.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • CGPS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Final Tuition based on current year$6,490.00$17,420.00
Final Program Fee$4,100.00$4,100.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (final)$10,590.00$21,520.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,400.00$1,400.00
The rates above may not apply to you if you are a UD graduate student during the time you are studying abroad. Please refer to http://www1.udel.edu/finaid/rates.html for the appropriate rates.
The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students does not apply to winter or summer session and is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onSeptember 20, 2021
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedSeptember 30, 2021
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *mid-October
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly January
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Karen Lundin
Study Abroad Coordinator
Institute for Global Studies, Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive
302-831-3082
klundin@udel.edu

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.