Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[103]
Spring 2022: Auckland, New Zealand
February 21, 2022 - June 27, 2022 (dates are tentative)

Natural Wonders of Rotorua, NZ
Meetings
Interest Meetings:
03/31/2021 4:00 PM - 5:00 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMrf-2gqzkrH9ZZvbvKV8EZBaCwFhXfLmsm
04/22/2021 6:00 PM - 7:00 PMhttps://udel.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErdO-srDspEt0IG058oujCu7Y5zvXUy5L8
Program Notes
Traveling and studying abroad during a global pandemic poses new challenges and requires accepting a higher level of uncertainty than in the past. Students who choose to study abroad at this time must be prepared to adapt to the evolving situation and must take responsibility to act in accordance with the rules, regulations, and recommendations of UD, their program leadership, and legal authorities of their home and host country. Due to the rapidly changing and unpredictable global and local response to COVID-19, these rules, regulations and recommendations are subject to change at any time.

The University will continue to monitor the ongoing situation with COVID-19 (coronavirus) as we approach the departure date for this program. Please reach out to your program coordinator or faculty director with questions and continue to monitor the
UD coronavirus webpage for updates.

If UD decides to cancel a study abroad program, we will communicate directly with affected students. In this case, the University of Delaware will reimburse the cost of program fees, tuition and flights (if purchase was advised by CGPS).
Program Description

Study in New Zealand at the University of Auckland (UOA). Stretching across 40 acres in the centre of the city of Auckland, the University campus is integrated into the heart of the city life. Harbour views and nearby parks provide a scenic study setting, just minutes’ walk from the city centre’s shopping and entertainment district. With a population of 1.5 million, 40% of whom were born overseas, city life in Auckland is a blend of cultures, cuisines and nature. Considered one of the top "most livable cities in the world," Auckland has two harbours and 3,700kms of coastline, and is the warmest and one of the sunniest of New Zealand’s cities.

UD students live in an on-campus residence hall within walking distance of classes, University amenities, the dining hall, and city center. Students will reside in a traditional residence hall with double rooms, shared baths & on-site dining hall.

UOA's facilities include a walkable campus providing spaces to study or catch up with new friends. The Kate Edgar Information Commons is located at the heart of campus offering easy access to the on-campus health and counseling centers, a pharmacy, IT support services, the Munchy Mart, as well as an open air cafe and food carts. Across the street students can utilize the library and academic support services. The UOA international office is located in the Alfred Nathan House, just beyond, providing a walk-in center for questions or concerns. Surrounding these student service buildings are the academic classroom buildings where students can find faculty offices and classrooms.

As a research university the University of Auckland is committed to research based teaching.UOA has nearly 2,000 faculty including researchers, scholars and creative artists at the forefront of their areas of expertise, both nationally and internationally. In fact, many write the leading textbooks on the subjects they teach. UOA's faculty are committed to helping students get the most from their study through incorporating the latest findings and perspectives related to the discipline. Opportunities to learn in a variety of research-related ways include projects, case studies, problem-based learning or designing and conducting experiments. Outside of classes, students will be able to attend free research seminars, lectures and events to hear presentations about current research projects. The University of Auckland aims to assist students in developing the following capabilities: disciplinary knowledge and practice, critical thinking, problem solving, independence and integrity, social and environmental responsibility.

Students will need to apply for a NZ student visa.

The Program Fee includes housing, medical insurance, orientation event and full access to all UOAs facilities and activities. Meal plans may be purchased directly through UOA.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Auckland. For planning purposes only, airfare is estimated at $1,800. Students will receive detailed travel instructions after acceptance, explaining how and where to purchase their plane ticket. See the Cost section below for estimate airfare. For this program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together. Prior to departure, detailed instructions will be provided regarding how to reach their accommodations from the Auckland airport.

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcomed and encouraged to study abroad, but should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
Honors credit may be available. Check with the faculty director and the Honors program for approval (check before departure).
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
All courses are taught in English (with the exception of foreign language courses). Courses meet UD graduation requirements.

Please note that students must register for a lecture and tutorial section for each course selected. See additional requirements for language study, including submission of UOA Language Declaration form.

Please note that the courses listed below have been reviewed by UD departments and approved as UD course equivalencies. This is a comprehensive list and not ALL of these courses may be offered in Spring of 2022. At the University of Auckland, Semester I = Spring Semester and Semester II = Fall Semester. Course offerings are subject to change.
ANTH 102: Human Biology, Behavior & Evolution (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 102 - How Humans Evolve
Humans are primates united by sociality, diversity, and flexibility and are subject to the same evolutionary forces as other species. However, human evolution is biocultural and is subject to both biological and cultural inheritances. Biological anthropology includes the study of human evolution past and present. This course will examine our evolutionary history and how evolution affects humans today.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Approved for 4 credits due to inclusion of weekly lab.
ANTH 103: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 101: World Archeology
Fundamental concepts and research procedures of archaeology. History of archaeology, methods of fieldwork and artifact analysis, and theories of humanbehavior in archaeological research.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Restrictions: Students who received credit in ANTH104 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
ANTH 167: Seminar: Images of Asia (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASIAN 100 Images of Asia
An interdisciplinary introduction to the histories and cultures of East Asian societies, exploring their development, their engagement with each other over time, and what makes them the societies that they are today.
ANTH 167: Seminar: Musics of the World in Everyday Life (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 103 Musics of the World in Everyday Life
Examines the personal, communal, religious, patriotic, emotional and economic roles that music plays in the lives of musicians, composers and listeners. Employs research from a range of ethnographic perspectives and encourages students to think and act analytically about their own musical worlds. Examples and case studies are drawn from around the globe, encompassing contemporary urban and remote village settings.
ANTH 167: Seminar: Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POPHLTH 111 Health and Society
To introduce frameworks and tools for measuring and understanding and improving the health of populations, both locally and globally. These frameworks and tools are derived from epidemiology, demography, public health, environmental health and global health sciences.
ANTH 201: Visualizing Humanity: Ethnographic Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 212 Ethnographic Film and Photography
Explores uses of photography and film in the production and dissemination of anthropological knowledge. Emphasises the choices in subject matter, imagined audience, composition, construction of narrative (or not), and mode of representation that are made at all stages in the production of ethnographic images. Uses ethnographic images to reflect on construction of ethnographic texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
UOA will not allow FR enrollment
ANTH 230: Peoples of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MAORI 130G - Te Ao Māori: The Māori World
An introduction to Maori analyses of topics that are often discussed and sometimes controversial, and that continue to shape contemporary life in New Zealand. Topics include aspects of world view, philosophy and social organisation; the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Waitangi and European immigration; and contemporary issues including Treaty claims, ownership of the foreshore and seabed and constitutional issues.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
ANTH 302: Medical Anthropology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 208: Medical Anthropology
This course introduces the field of Medical Anthropology. It examines the interaction of biology and culture as it affects health and medical systems and focuses on: 1) cross cultural comparisons; 2) notion of adaptation in biocultural evolution; 3) understanding and appreciation of “exotic” ethnomedical systems; 4) critical cultural analysis of Biomedicine; 5) understanding issues of stigma, disability and the social process of health and illness; and 6) application of the concept of culture to practical problems in health delivery in a multicultural society.



May be crosslisted with BHAN 302.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
ANTH 304: Health, Culture, and Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 337 Birth, Death, and Disease: Anthropological Demography
Examines how human populations change over time, what factors underlie patterns of disease and death, and why demography is so important to the study of epidemics. The course will explore the use of demographic methods and theories of demographic and epidemiological transition to examine fertility, morbidity, mortality, and migration from an anthropological perspective, with a particular focus on infectious disease dynamics.
Prerequisite: Anthropology coursework
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
ANTH 363: Women in a Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 342 - Human Sex, Gender and Sexuality
Explores the central anthropological topics of human sex, sexuality and gender from diverse perspectives. Topics may include cross-cultural and social conceptualisations and creations of difference; ideas about biology, gender and sexuality; how they are simultaneously socio-cultural products and forces; lived experiences and corporeal and political phenomena; reproductive politics; and global, national and local sexual and gender relations.
Prerequisite: Anthropology coursework
ART 133-071: Drawing for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FINEARTS 103 - Drawing and Related Practices
An introduction to different approaches to drawing and its relationship with contemporary practices in art and design, including traditional approaches to drawing and drawing techniques. Students will also explore drawing as a conceptual process. Research which investigates drawings as both a technical and conceptual practice is encouraged.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Restrictions: UOA approved for UD art majors.
ARTH 167: Seminar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTHIST 114 Understanding Art: Leonardo to Warhol
Is seeing learned? Can an image be read in the same way as a text? Understanding images from different historic periods, from Leonardo da Vinci to Andy Warhol, is central to everyday life. Visual literacy is fundamental to all disciplines. This course provides students with tools for making sense of various kinds of images and objects: photographs, advertisements, paintings, film, television, monuments, buildings, maps, landscape, digital and internet images.
ASIA 367: Seminar: New Zealand and Asia (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASIAN 140 New Zealand and Asia
Explores Asia and its interrelationship with New Zealand, including Asia's growing presence in New Zealand in all its manifestations, and the evolving political, social, economic, cultural, and strategic relations between this country and Asia. Topics will include historical and contemporary ties with Asia, Asian migration, literature, media and films. The course will focus especially on South-East and East Asia.
Offered Semester II 2021
BISC 106: Elementary Human Physiology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDSCI 142: Biology for Biomedical Science: Organ Systems
The structure and function of humans; mechanisms of maintenance and reproductive behavior.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Open to non-majors only. Students who received credit in BISC276 or BISC306 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
BISC 106: Elementary Human Physiology + Lab (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDSCI 205: The Physiology of Human Organ Systems
The structure and function of humans; mechanisms of maintenance and reproductive behavior.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Open to non-majors only. Students who received credit in BISC276 or BISC306 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
BISC 106 + BISC 116 is equivalent to MEDSCI 205.
BISC 207-071: Introductory Biology I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOSCI 101 - Life! Origins and Mechanisms
Questions what Life is and explores its machinery. Speculates on how Life arose from the flow and capture of solar energy, to power growth, movement, replication and storage of generic information. Then, describes how genes interact with environments, and how mutations can be catastrophic or transformational. These processes underpin life as we know it.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Class has an associated lab (several timetable available)
BISC 302: General Ecology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOSCI 206 Principles of Ecology
Interactions between organisms and their environments, population dynamics and interactions, communities, energy transfer within an ecological system, and components of the ecosystem.
Prerequisite: BISC 208.
BUAD 301: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKTG 151G: Essential Marketing
Management of the marketing functions, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, pricing, personal selling, and advertising. Emphasis on consumer and industrial markets.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 429: Selected Topics in Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INTBUS 151G: Business Across Borders
Topical seminar on such management issues as organizational socialization, work motivation, and organization-environment relations. Development of an individual research project is stressed.
Prerequisite: BUAD 309
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: COE Professional & Career Preparation Requirement
CHEM 103-101: General Chemistry (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 120 - Chemistry of the Material World
Matter, the changes that matter undergoes, and the laws governing these changes, with greater emphasis on atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, and energy relationships. Properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. Includes 42 hours of laboratory work.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: MATH-115.
Students whose MATH Placement Examination score placed them in MATH-221 or higher need not take a MATH course coincident with CHEM-103. For majors in the physical and natural sciences, mathematics and engineering.
CHEM 107: General Chemistry for Life Sciences (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 110 - Chemistry of the Living World
Principles of chemistry, with applications to biology and other life sciences. Includes weekly laboratory work and discussion sections. COREQ: MATH114 or higher. MATH115 or MATH117 strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
CHIN 105: Chinese I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 100 Beginning Modern Chinese 1
This course gradually and systematically introduces grammar and Chinese characters with tutorials four days a week to ensure the best learning results. By the end of the course, you are expected to communicate orally in Chinese on simple topics of everyday life, to read simple texts written in Chinese characters and to write about 150 Chinese characters.
CHIN 201: Advanced Intermediate Chinese I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 200 Intermediate Modern Chinese 1
Further develops students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing proficiency. Students who successfully complete the course will be familiar with most of the topics related to everyday life and can communicate in a limited range of contexts.
COMM 245: Media & Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COMMS 100: Communication, Technology and Culture
The relationship between media and culture; how media affect culture (i.e., socialization and role modeling); and exploration of new forms of mass communication.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
COMM 263-070: Communicative Behavior & Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUSINESS 151G - Communication in a Multicultural Society
Communication knowledge and skills are essential in business careers and for interpersonal and intercultural relationships. This course offers a theory-based approach combined with applied communication practices. Communication knowledge, competencies and skills are developed through exploring relationships, mediated communication, writing, team dynamics, oral presentation and technologies.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
Global Studies Minor
COMM 263: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GLOBAL 100: Intercultural Communication
Communicative processes in other cultures as well as subcultures in the US will be discussed. Students will become more mindful and aware of their own cultural patterns as well. Difficulties in cross cultural communication will also be discussed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Multicultural
ECON 100: Economic Issues & Policies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 151G - Understanding the Global Economy
Economics affects our daily lives and the global environment in many ways. Through the media we are constantly made aware of price increases, interest rate changes, exchange rate movements and balance of payments problems, growth and recessions, standard of living comparisons, regional trading agreements. What does it all mean and how does it all work?
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 100: Economic Issues and Policies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 152: Principles of Economics
Takes a nontechnical approach to basic economics. Applies economic conceptsto contemporary issues, problems and policies. Covers both macro and microtopics.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Students who received credit in ECON101 or ECON103 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
ENGL 101: Tools of Textual Analysis (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGLISH 101 Literature and the Contemporary
Gateway introduction to basic tools and strategies used in critical engagement with poety fiction, drama, and nonfiction. Includes fundamental concepts of textual analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 201: Rewriting Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGLISH 207 - Creating Stories
The course encourages students’ creative and critical engagement with a wide variety of literature (poetry, prose, drama, film, etc.) by emphasizing how their own work as readers and writers connects them to the world outside the classroom.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to first and second year students.
ENGL 215: Introduction to Ethnic and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 105 - Cultural Studies and Society
Representations of ethnicity, social class, race, gender, and other constructions of identity in primary texts (literature, film, visual arts, etc.). Secondary texts expose students to variety of methodologies for studying culture and identity to demystify the process by which scholarship is produced. Students entering the Ethnic & Cultural Studies curriculum are encouraged to think about how scholars go about identifying research questions, laying the foundation for senior theses and collaborative research projects.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGLISH 102 - Great Books: Seduction & Betrayal
Allows for exploration of a particular aspect of the intersection of literature and culture, and enables in-depth study beyond the period survey course. Topics vary according to the expertise of the instructor.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COMPLIT 200 - World Literatures 1: Lisa, Death, War, Peace, Love
Allows for exploration of a particular aspect of the intersection of literature and culture, and enables in-depth study beyond the period survey course. Topics vary according to the expertise of the instructor.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
ENGL 290: Studies in Literature for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COMPLIT 202 - Interpreting Folktales
An introduction to the study and interpretation of folktales. Tales from many cultures will be examined. Contrasting theories on the origins and meaning of folktales will be explored.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Not recommended for freshman
ENSC 101-071: Introduction to the Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENVSCI 101G - Environment, Science and Management
A review of the elementary biology, chemistry and meteorology behind natural and man-made phenomena that change (or destroy) ecosystems. The crude costs and benefits to society of using or protecting natural resources.
Offered Semester I & II 2021
ENTR 167: Seminar: Design Futures (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DESIGN 102G Design Futures
New opportunities are continually emerging in the field of design. This course demonstrates how contemporary design practices have evolved, responded to and influenced change. Students learn how a design approach complements current practice and expands career prospects.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
ENTR 267: Seminar: Innovation Through Design (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INNOVATE 100G Innovation Through Edsign
Introduces design thinking and develops a user-centred approach to innovation, emphasising the importance of a deep understanding of user needs throughout an iterative ideation and prototyping process. Utilising the maker space at the Unleash Space and a range of digital tools, students will develop practical making and early stage prototyping skills.
Offered Semester I 2021
ENTR 367: Seminar: The Entrepreneurial Mindset (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INNOVENT 203G
Stimulates new ways of thinking about enterprising behaviour in a multi-disciplinary manner relevant to understanding and addressing real world challenges of today. Introduces skills needed to identify and assess opportunities, solve problems creatively, communicate persuasively, work effectively in teams, and understand individual and organisational impact.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
ENTR 451: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship: Understanding I&E in a Global Context (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INNOVENT201: Understanding Innovation & Entrepreneurship
Examines selected topics of current interest in various areas of entrepreneurship.



May be crosslisted with BUAD 451.
Prerequisite: ENTR 350/BUAD 350 ENTR 351/BUAD 351 or requires permission of instructor.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth: COE Professional & Career Preparation Requirement
FREN 105: French I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRENCH 101 Introductory French Language 1
Introduction to the French language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
FREN 106: French II - Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRENCH 102 Introductory French Language 2
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: FREN 105. Two to three years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
FREN 107: French II - Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRENCH 102 Introductory French Language 2
Completion of basic French. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: FREN 105
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Two to three years of high school French acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
FREN 209: French Conversation Though Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FRENCH 239 France on Screen: From Lumiere to Godard
Development of oral proficiency in French through discussion and analysis of major French films. Some written work and grammar review where appropriate.
Prerequisite: FREN 107 or FREN 200 with a minimum grade of C.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: EG Breadth: COE Breadth Requirement
Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers of French.
GEOG 101-071: Physical Geography - Climatic Processes (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 101 + GEOG 111 Earth Surface Processes and Landforms
Understanding of the functioning of natural systems at the Earth's surface and human interactions with these systems. Examines the operation and interaction between Atmospheric, Hydrological, Ecological and Geomorphic systems. Environmental processes are an integrating theme. Topics include: climate and hydrological systems, ecological processes; surface sediment cycle; and processes governing development and dynamics of major landform types.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
GEOG 102: Human Geography (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 102: Geography of the Human Environment
Examination of the spatial distribution of human activities worldwide. Particular attention is given to those factors and processes that have led to spatial inequality and locational conflict from the international scale to the neighborhood scale.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
GEOG 235-070: Conservation of Natural Resources (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 205 - Environment & Society
Physical, social and economic problems involved in integrating resource management and maintaining environmental quality.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
GEOG 267-300: Geography Transfer Credit (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOSCI 100 - Antarctica: The Frozen Continent
A general introduction to Antarctica and its environs including the Southern Ocean and the sub-Antarctic islands. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of Antarctica and how resident plants, animals and micro-organisms have adapted to cope with the extreme environment. Specific topics to be addressed include: the history of Antarctic exploration and its impact on the development of Antarctic science, Antarctic ecosystems, Antarctica as a wilderness region, and the impact of humans including the exploitation of resources and the effects of pollution. This course is suitable for students with both science and non-science backgrounds.
GEOL 107-070: Geology of Dynamic Earth (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EARTHSCI 120 - Planet Earth
Examination of geologic processes that have shaped Earth and life through time, and their impact on modern society. Topics include: earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, meteorites and planets, mass extinctions and evolution of life. A practical introduction to rocks, minerals and fossils provides insights into Earth's past and important modern resources.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
GEOL 302: Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EARTHSCI 203 Rock and Minerals
The formation of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, the minerals they contain, and how they can be used to interpret major Earth Science processes such as crustal evolution, volcanism, mountain building, deformation, and sedimentation.
Offered Semester I 2021
HDFS 201: Life Span Development (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HUMSERV102: Lifespan Development for Human Services
Exploration and understanding of the social, emotional, cognitive and physical development of the individual from infancy through old age in the context of the family.
HDFS 202: Diversity and Families (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCCHFAM 215: Whanau-Family-Aigi Community
Examination of diverse families in the United States with a focus on issues of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender. Emphasis is on the accelerating effects of globalization and social change.
HDFS 203: Racial Identity, Bias, and the Self (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EDUC211: Schooling Ethnic Diversity


The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of racism, other social frameworks, and their individual and systemic effects. Students will explore cultural practices around the world, their own racial identity and cultural biases during the course. Students will learn self-awareness techniques and cultural competence training.
HDFS 223: Foundations of Child Development (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EDUC 115: Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development
Study of cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of children from conception to age 12. Variables that influence child development including family and cultural factors. Designed for non-teacher education majors.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Restrictions: Students who received credit in HDFS220 or HDFS221 are not eligible to take this course without permission. This course cannot be taken by Early Childhood Education major or Human Services majors in the Early Childhood Development concentration.
HDFS 475: Topics in HDFS: Mental Health in Social Practice (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCHLTH313: Mental Health in Social Practice
Selected topics focusing on current issues affecting families from an interdisciplinary and global perspective.
May crosslist with AFRA 476.
HDFS 475: Topics in HDFS: Issues in Child Welfare and Protection (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCCHIFAM 734: Issues in Child Welfare and Protection
Selected topics focusing on current issues affecting families from an interdisciplinary and global perspective.
May crosslist with AFRA476.
HIST 102: Europe and the World since 1648 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HUMS Europe: Medieval to Modern
The transformations of Europe since the middle of the 17th century through cultural, social, and economic developments, revolutions, wars, and interactions with other parts of the world.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 210: Introduction to Military History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HISTORY 205 Bloodlands: Global Warfare
Survey of the history of warfare from the ancient Greeks through World War I, with emphasis upon tactics, weapons, armor, strategy and the human factors that contributed to success or failure in war.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 365-070: Topics in Asian & Pacific History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HISTORY 104 - Pacific History: An Introduction
A survey of the history of the Pacific from 1000 to the present. Includes indigenous histories, colonisation and post-colonisation, cross-cultural encounters, warfare, and environmental change.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HLPR 233-071: Introduction to Global Health (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDSCI 101G - Environmental Threats to Human Health
Introduces key diseases and conditions which affect the health of different populations including basic biological and varying social aspects which cause major global health issues. Emphasis on the developing world, the health of the poor, and possible solutions. Cross-listed with UAPP 233.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
UD course is cross listed with UAPP 233
ITAL 105: Italian I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITALIAN 100 Introductory Italian Language
Introduction to the Italian language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth Requirement
JAPN 106-070: Japanese II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAPANESE 131 Japanese Language 1B
Continued practice in the aural, oral, reading, and writing skills of contemporary Japanese, including the identification and reproduction of basic Kanji characters. Introduction to formality levels and critical verb forms needed for more advanced communication.
Prerequisite: JAPN 105 or two to three years of high school Japanese acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
JAPN 201: Advanced Intermediate Japanese I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAPANESE 231 Japanese Language 2A
First of the two-course series which form the core of 200-level Japanese, the other being JAPN 202. The goal is to build upper intermediate level grammar, vocabulary, and Kanji. All four areas of language (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) are emphasized.
Prerequisite: JAPN 107.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Other: College of Engineering Breadth
JAPN 208-073: Contemporary Japanese Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAPANESE 150 - Exploring Japan
Covers Japanese cultural history from the pre-historic age until the 1990s, and serves as an introduction to contemporary Japan. It deals with such diverse fields as Japanese literature, economy, the political system, Japan's position in the world, popular culture, social structures and gender relations. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
JOUR 301: Journalism in a Free Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COMMS 201 - Journalism Studies
An exploration into the purpose of U.S. journalism in a democracy, raising issues of ethics, the First Amendment and the process by which information is gathered and presented by all members of the news community. Covers the impact of history, economics and technology on the future of journalism, as well as the growing importance of news literacy by news consumers.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ENGL110.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
KAAP 180: Introduction to Exercise Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EXERSCI 100G: Exercise and Fitness: Myths and Reality
Introduction to the science of human movement. Survey of selected topics in the areas of exercise physiology, sports medicine, biomechanics, exercise psychology, and motor control.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
KAAP 430: Exercise Physiology (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EXERSCI 201: Exercise Physiology 1
Study of the integration of human physiological systems in the performance of exercise, work and sports activities and under the influence of environmental stressors.
Prerequisite: KAAP 221 or KAAP 310 or BISC 276 or BISC 306
KAAP 440: Topics in Exercise Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EXERSCI 105: Human Anatomy
Course content varies each semester with a focus on topics within Kinesiology and Applied Physiology.
Restrictions: Open to seniors or with permission of instructor. May be repeated for nine credits when topics vary.
LING 101: Introduction to Linguistics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LINGUIST 100 Introduction to Linguistics
LINGUISTICS 100 is your introduction to the major subfields of Linguistics: phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics and the scientific methodology used to describe them. The human capacity for language makes us unique in the animal world. Linguists seek to explain what exactly "language" is, what its properties are and which of them are universal. Linguistics as a discipline is a relatively recent phenomenon, but records show that our capacity for language has occupied the thoughts of scholars for thousands of years. Like the ancients, modern linguists also want to know how language developed, how it has evolved and why only humans?
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Offered Semester I 2021
LLCU 106: Modern Language II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: KOREAN 111 - Korean for Beginners 2
Further develops the basic proficiency in Korean necessary to communicate in limited situations. Uses a range of exercises and activities to develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Introduces distinctive aspects of contemporary Korean culture related to language-use situations.
Students must submit a Language Ability Declaration form online when registering. http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/en/for/current-students/undergraduate/enrolment/first-time-enrolment-in-language-courses.html
LLCU 316: Classic Mythology: Gods, Heroes and Monsters (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CLASSICS 110 Classic Mythology
Cosmological myths and heroic sagas in the literature and art of Greece and Rome. The influence of the mythology in later art and literature.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
MAST 200: The Oceans (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MARINE 100G: The Oceans Around Us
Integrates physical, chemical, geological and biological principles into an overview that addresses why and how the oceans work. Draws heavily on current ocean issues to illustrate processes and problems.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Open only to non-science majors or with permission from instructor.
MAST 366: Department Elective (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MARINE 202: Principles of Marine Science
Department Elective.
MATH 221-300: Calculus I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 108 - General Mathematics
A general entry to Mathematics for commerce and the social sciences, following Year 13 Mathematics. MATHS 108 covers selected topics in algebra and calculus and their applications, including: linear functions, linear equations and matrices; functions, equations and inequalities; limits and continuity; differential calculus of one and two variables; integral calculus of one variable.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
MATH 241-070: Analytic Geometry & Calculus A (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 102 - Functioning in Mathematics (and intro to Calculus)
Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives. Polynomial, rational, exponential, hyperbolic, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Definite and indefinite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Simple differential equations (separable ODE, linear ODE). ODE models leading to exponential growth and decay.
Prerequisite: MATH 117, or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both MATH241 and MATH221.
MATH 302: Ordinary Differential Equations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 199 - Advancing in Mathematics
An introduction to University level mathematics, for high-achieving students currently at high school. The numerical computing environment MATLAB is used to study beautiful mathematics from algebra, analysis, applied mathematics and combinatorics. Students will learn to write mathematical proofs and create mathematical models to find solutions to real-world problems.
Restrictions: Prerequisite: UOA Departmental approval
MUSC 205-071: Music of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 234 - Popular Music of the Pacific
From hip hop to reggae to pop, this course explores Pacific popular music genre, artists and songs as well as relevant musical techniques, modes of distribution and processes of fusion and change. It probes the positions and possibilities of Pasifika pop musics by discussing critical questions about culture, authenticity, modernisation, consumerism, identity and musical (ex)change.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
PHIL 105-070: Critical Thinking (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking
Dialogue, argument and discussion are analysed. Distinctions are drawn between persuasive, logically good and materially good arguments. The focus is on well reasoned persuasive dialogue, and mistakes in persuasive reasoning. Topics include the point of an argument, strength of arguments, fallacious reasoning, relevance of reasons, and burden of proof.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 202: Contemporary Moral Problems (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 104: Ethics and Justice
The application of philosophical techniques to contemporary moral problems such as abortion, punishment, biomedical ethics, reverse discrimination and sexual morality.



May be crosslisted with WOMS 203.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 205: Logic (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 101: Introduction to Logic
Concepts and techniques of elementary symbolic logic: truth and consistency of sentences, validity and soundness of arguments; translation of English sentences into a formal language, construction of truth tables and the use of a system of natural deduction to prove the validity of deductive arguments.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 133-070: Introduction to Astronomy (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASTRO 100G - Planets, Stars and Galaxies
Objects of the universe from the earth to galaxies. How the universal laws that govern them; e.g., gravity and electromagnetic radiation, permit us to learn their nature from quantitative observations. Telescopic observations, visual and electronic, included in the laboratory.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Not for credit for those who have taken PHYS144.
PHYS 201-071: Introductory Physics I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 120 - Advancing Physics I
For students progressing in physical science. Key topics are mechanics, energy, rotation, oscillations, waves and thermodynamics. This is a calculus based course, focusing on fundamental principles, problem solving and hands-on exercises.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 202-071: Introductory Physics II (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 121
For students progressing in physical science. Key topics are electrostatics, electromagnetism, circuits, optics, relativity and quantum mechanics. This is a calculus based course, focusing on fundamental principles, problem solving and hands-on exercises. Recommended preparation is PHYSICS 120 or NCEA Level 3 Physics and Mathematics, or equivalent.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 202: Introductory Physics II (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 202 Electromagnetism
Second course in a sequence with PHYS 201 that provides an introduction to physics for students in the life and environmental sciences. Topics include wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 201 or SHYS 207. Only one course from PHYS202 and PHYS208 can count toward graduation.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 267-070: Physics Seminar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 160 - Physics for the Life Sciences
Designed for students intending to advance in the biomedical and life sciences, this course is focused on physical principles relevant to biological systems. Key topics are motion, waves, thermal physics, electricity and instrumentation. The course is primarily algebra-based and includes lectures, laboratories and tutorials. Recommended preparation is NCEA Level 2 Physics and Mathematics, or equivalent.
POSC 240-073/083: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 106 - Global Politics
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Required of all World Scholars in Auckland. Honors section is available.
POSC 285: Introduction to Political Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 109
Basic introduction to political philosophy, organized not around particular historical periods or specific philosophers, but around some of the most important, enduring questions of political theory: What is the nature of the state? What are the obligations and responsibilities of citizens?
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 309: Political Culture by Country: New Zealand Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 107 - New Zealand Politics
An introduction to understanding who governs New Zealand and in whose interests. Topics include national identity, institutions of government, leadership, voting and elections, the place of Maori within the political system, parties and political participation. The course draws on current research in NZ politics and provides knowledge that can be applied to a variety of careers, including law, business and public service.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
POSC 408: International Organization (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 201: Globalisation and International Organisations
Analysis of the organization of the international system, its structure, operating principles, formal and informal components.
POSC 435: Political Thought II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 209
From Machiavelli to present.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 443: China and the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 254
Historical and theoretical examination of Chinese foreign policy since 1949, including discussion of China’s relations with larger and developing powers, China’s historical conception of itself in the world, significance of China’s interdependence with the world and China’s participation in international and regional organizations.
RUSS 106-070: Russian II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: RUSSIAN 101 - Beginners' Russian 2
Completion of basic Russian. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: RUSS105 or two to three years of high school Russian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
SOCI 201: Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 100 Issues and Themes in Sociology
An overview of the sociological perspective of the study of society, social organization and social institutions with special emphasis on the social causes and consequences of human behavior.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 266: Special Problems: Contemporary Italian Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC 250: Contemporary Italian Society
SOCI 266: Special Problems: Sociology in Auckland (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 206 Sociology in Auckland
SOCI 267-074: General Sociology Elective (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 101G - Understanding Aotearoa New Zealand
Provides an introduction to the sociological analysis of New Zealand society. Looks at familiar events, institutions, social processes from a sociological point of view and offers ways to understand them in new and different ways. Focuses on the structure of New Zealand society and on social and political changes which affect the lives of New Zealanders and shape their society.
SOCI 267: Special Problems: Culture and Diversity (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCWORK 113 Culture and Diversity
SOCI 312: Theories of Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 200 Theory and Society
Covers writings of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and related current approaches. Focuses on theoretical perspectives concerned with social development, social conflict, solidarity, social class and gender.
SOCI 340: Global Policy and Inequality (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 103 New Zealand Social Policy and Social Justice
Explores the relationship between social policy and social inequality in the U.S. and comparable societies. Focuses on public policy and the role of NGOs in social service delivery. Specific social policy areas include employment, family, health care, education, social security, welfare, and affirmative action policies.
THEA 102-070: Introduction to Performance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DRAMA 100 - Taking the Stage: Performance & Presentation Skills
Survey of performance training techniques for the non-minor. Topics may include elements of voice, improvisation, movement, dance, and character analysis and portrayal.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
UAPP 167: Special Problem Seminar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POPLHLTH 101: Health Systems 1
Seminar
UAPP 211: Introduction to Public Health (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POPLHLTH 102: Health and Society
Overview of public health, addressing the history, epidemiological principles, social and behavioral factors, and environmental, political and medical-care issues concerning public health practice. Exploration of the practicality of public health as portrayed through current events, guest speakers, and case studies.



Crosslisted with HLPR 211.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
UNIV 373-035: Study Abroad - Auckland, New Zealand (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Restrictions: Restricted to UD World Scholar Admits
Requirements
The semester in Auckland is designed for undergraduate sophomores, juniors, and seniors regardless of major with a minimum 2.8 grade point average at the time of application. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by telephone.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please email a copy of your official transcript to the Program Coordinator.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Spring Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,800.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and CGPS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in mid-October.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early January.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • CGPS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Estimated Tuition based on current year$6,365.00$17,080.00
Estimated Program Fee$6,450.00$6,450.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (estimated)$12,815.00$23,530.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,800.00$1,800.00
The rates above may not apply to you if you are a UD graduate student during the time you are studying abroad. Please refer to http://www1.udel.edu/finaid/rates.html for the appropriate rates.
The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onSeptember 20, 2021
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedSeptember 30, 2021
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *mid-October
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly January
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Karen Lundin
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-4399
302-831-6042
klundin@udel.edu

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.