Program Information
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Spring 2022: World Scholars - Auckland, New Zealand
February 21, 2022 - June 26, 2022 (dates are tentative)
This program has been cancelled. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Natural Wonders of Rotorua, NZ
Meetings
Program Notes
World Scholars - Auckland is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program.
Program Description

The University of Delaware World Scholars Program is a four-year program for internationalizing a student's undergraduate career. Choosing from a wide range of majors, World Scholars are supported in their studies with internationally-focused academics, experiences, and opportunities that will prepare them to live and work anywhere in the world.

Class of 2025 UD World Scholars will study abroad twice, including spring semester of their freshman year in Greece, Italy, Spain or New Zealand, and in any of 40+ destinations during their junior year.

Scholars heading to New Zealand will study abroad at our partner institution, the University of Auckland (UOA). Stretching across 40 acres in the centre of the city of Auckland, the University campus is integrated into the heart of the city life. Harbour views and nearby parks provide a scenic study setting, just minutes’ walk from the city centre’s shopping and entertainment district. With a population of 1.5 million, 40% of whom were born overseas, city life in Auckland is a blend of cultures, cuisines and nature. Considered one of the top "most livable cities in the world," Auckland has two harbours and 3,700kms of coastline, and is the warmest and one of the sunniest of New Zealand’s cities.

UD World Scholars live in an on-campus residence hall within walking distance of classes, University amenities, the dining hall, and city center. Scholars will reside in a traditional residence hall with double rooms, shared baths & on-site dining hall. The meal plan includes three meals on weekdays & two meals on weekend days with ability to take away meals for day trips and excursions.

UOA's facilities include a walkable campus providing spaces to study or catch up with new friends. The Kate Edgar Information Commons is located at the heart of campus offering easy access to the on-campus health and counseling centers, a pharmacy, IT support services, the Munchy Mart, as well as an open air cafe and food carts. Across the street students can utilize the library and academic support services. The UOA international office is located in the Alfred Nathan House, just beyond, providing a walk-in center for questions or concerns. Surrounding these student service buildings are the academic classroom buildings where students can find faculty offices and classrooms.

As a research university the University of Auckland is committed to research based teaching.UOA has nearly 2,000 faculty including researchers, scholars and creative artists at the forefront of their areas of expertise, both nationally and internationally. In fact, many write the leading textbooks on the subjects they teach. UOA's faculty are committed to helping students get the most from their study through incorporating the latest findings and perspectives related to the discipline. Opportunities to learn in a variety of research-related ways include projects, case studies, problem-based learning or designing and conducting experiments. Outside of classes, students will be able to attend free research seminars, lectures and events to hear presentations about current research projects. The University of Auckland aims to assist students in developing the following capabilities: disciplinary knowledge and practice, critical thinking, problem solving, independence and integrity, social and environmental responsibility.

World Scholars will need to apply for a NZ student visa; which is free. IGS staff will assist students with the visa application process.

The Program Fee includes housing, medical insurance, some meals, airport transfers in Auckland for those traveling on the recommended flights, orientation week activities, numerous excursions, opening and closing celebrations and full access to all UOAs facilities and activities.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Auckland. For planning purposes only, airfare is estimated at $1,800. Students who wish to travel with the UD representative, must book the recommended flights.

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Before making the decision to study abroad, prospective students with disabilities should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some study abroad locations may differ from the United States. Review our Diversity Abroad information with family. You may also contact World Scholar Program leadership to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Honors credit may be available. Check with the faculty director and the Honors program for approval (check before departure).
All courses listed below are taught in English (with the exception of foreign language courses). Courses meet UD graduation requirements.

Scholars will enroll in POSC 240 Introduction to Global Politics and will select two or three additional courses.

Please note that students must register for a lecture and tutorial section for each course selected. See additional requirements for language study, including submission of UOA Language Declaration form.

World Scholars will work with their UD academic advisors to select courses for their semester abroad. World Scholars should select alternate courses in the event that primary course choices are full or not offered.

World Scholars who do not see a course listed below that they need should email Meghan (gladlem@udel.edu). The email should include:
--Course code (ex. SPAN 301)
--Reason why you need to take this course - what requirement does the course fill for you?
--Confirm if your advisor agrees that you need to take this course

Please note that the courses listed below have been reviewed by UD departments and approved as UD course equivalencies. Each course notes when offered. At the University of Auckland, Semester I = Spring Semester and Semester II = Fall Semester. Course offerings are subject to change.
ANTH 103: Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 101 World Archaeology
This course is a survey of world archaeology from the emergence of culture over two million years ago in Africa, through the development of food production in the Near East, Asia and the Americas and the rise of the first cities and states in Mesopotamia, China and the Americas. We conclude with a survey of the last great human adventure which was the settlement of Oceania ending in Polynesia and New Zealand.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Offered Semester I 2021
ANTH 167: Seminar: Images of Asia (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASIAN 100 Images of Asia
An interdisciplinary introduction to the histories and cultures of East Asian societies, exploring their development, their engagement with each other over time, and what makes them the societies that they are today.
Offered Semester 1 2021
ANTH 167: Seminar: Musics of the World in Everyday Life (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 103 Musics of the World in Everyday Life
Examines the personal, communal, religious, patriotic, emotional and economic roles that music plays in the lives of musicians, composers and listeners. Employs research from a range of ethnographic perspectives and encourages students to think and act analytically about their own musical worlds. Examples and case studies are drawn from around the globe, encompassing contemporary urban and remote village settings.
Offered Semester I 2021
ANTH 167: Seminar: Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POPHLTH 111 Health and Society
To introduce frameworks and tools for measuring and understanding and improving the health of populations, both locally and globally. These frameworks and tools are derived from epidemiology, demography, public health, environmental health and global health sciences.
Offered Semester I 2021
ANTH 230: Peoples of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MAORI 130G - Te Ao Māori: The Māori World
An introduction to Maori analyses of topics that are often discussed and sometimes controversial, and that continue to shape contemporary life in New Zealand. Topics include aspects of world view, philosophy and social organisation; the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Waitangi and European immigration; and contemporary issues including Treaty claims, ownership of the foreshore and seabed and constitutional issues.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Offered Semester I & II 2021
ANTH 302: Medical Anthropology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 208 Medical Anthropology
Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that draws most on social/cultural anthropology and biological anthropology to address issues of human health and disease. Included in the subfield are studies of cultural constructions of health and illness, medical knowledge and practices relating to health, illness and healing, the co-evolution of humans and diseases, provision of health services, health effects of development and globalisation, human ecology and the relationship between health, politics and economics. While not all of medical anthropology is applied, there is a strong emphasis in that direction.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semester I 2021
ART 133-071: Drawing for Non-Majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FINEARTS 103 - Drawing and Related Practices
An introduction to different approaches to drawing and its relationship with contemporary practices in art and design, including traditional approaches to drawing and drawing techniques. Students will also explore drawing as a conceptual process. Research which investigates drawings as both a technical and conceptual practice is encouraged.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Restrictions: UOA approved for UD art majors.
Course not offered in 2021
ARTH 167: Seminar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTHIST 114 Understanding Art: Leonardo to Warhol
Is seeing learned? Can an image be read in the same way as a text? Understanding images from different historic periods, from Leonardo da Vinci to Andy Warhol, is central to everyday life. Visual literacy is fundamental to all disciplines. This course provides students with tools for making sense of various kinds of images and objects: photographs, advertisements, paintings, film, television, monuments, buildings, maps, landscape, digital and internet images.
ARTH 167: Seminar: Understanding Art: Leonardo to Warhol (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ARTHIST 114 Understanding Art: Leonardo to Warhol
Is seeing learned? Can an image be read in the same way as a text? Understanding images from different historic periods, from Leonardo da Vinci to Andy Warhol, is central to everyday life. Visual literacy is fundamental to all disciplines. This course provides students with tools for making sense of various kinds of images and objects: photographs, advertisements, paintings, film, television, monuments, buildings, maps, landscape, digital and internet images.
Offered Semester I 2021
ASIA 367: Seminar: New Zealand and Asia (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASIAN 140 New Zealand and Asia
Explores Asia and its interrelationship with New Zealand, including Asia's growing presence in New Zealand in all its manifestations, and the evolving political, social, economic, cultural, and strategic relations between this country and Asia. Topics will include historical and contemporary ties with Asia, Asian migration, literature, media and films. The course will focus especially on South-East and East Asia.
Offered Semester II 2021
BISC 106: Elementary Human Physiology + Lab (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDSCI 205 The Physiology of Human Organ Systems
An integrative approach is used to study fundamental physiological processes which enable the body to overcome the challenge of life. Drawing on examples of normal and abnormal function, the course examines the interaction of vital physiological processes, from cellular control mechanisms to multiple organ systems.



Topics include: control of fluid and electrolytes, cardiovascular control, energy use, and the delivery of oxygen and metabolites.
Prerequisite: UOA Pre-requisite in introductory study in Biomedical Science
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
UD's BISC 106 + 116 is equivalent to MEDSCI 205 Offered Semester I 2021
BUAD 301: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKTG 151G Essential Marketing
Marketing is an integral part of our modern world. Essential Marketing is designed for non-business students and provides an inside view of the world of marketing. We explore basic marketing principles and examine contemporary issues relevant to our changing world. We emphasise the creation of customer value and satisfaction through these principles and practices.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Offered Semester I 2021
CHEM 103-101: General Chemistry (+ Lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 120 - Chemistry of the Material World
Matter, the changes that matter undergoes, and the laws governing these changes, with greater emphasis on atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, and energy relationships. Properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. Includes 42 hours of laboratory work.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: MATH-115.
Students whose MATH Placement Examination score placed them in MATH-221 or higher need not take a MATH course coincident with CHEM-103. For majors in the physical and natural sciences, mathematics and engineering. Offered Semester I & II 2021
CHEM 107: General Chemistry for Life Sciences (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 110 - Chemistry of the Living World
Principles of chemistry, with applications to biology and other life sciences. Includes weekly laboratory work and discussion sections. COREQ: MATH114 or higher. MATH115 or MATH117 strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semester I & II 2021
CHIN 105: Chinese I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 100 Beginning Modern Chinese 1
This course gradually and systematically introduces grammar and Chinese characters with tutorials four days a week to ensure the best learning results. By the end of the course, you are expected to communicate orally in Chinese on simple topics of everyday life, to read simple texts written in Chinese characters and to write about 150 Chinese characters.
Offered Semester I 2021
CHIN 201: Advanced Intermediate Chinese I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 200 Intermediate Modern Chinese 1
Further develops students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing proficiency. Students who successfully complete the course will be familiar with most of the topics related to everyday life and can communicate in a limited range of contexts.
Offered Semester I 2021
COMM 245: Media and Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COMMS 100 Communication, Technology and Culture
Explores the past, present and future of communication media. Examines communication media within their social context, and provides a particular focus on the interplay between technology and culture. Key concepts in the study of communication are introduced and various communication media are studied via specific case studies, with particular emphasis placed on new digital platforms including social and mobile media as well as older forms such as television and cinema.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 100: Economic Issues & Policies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 151G - Understanding the Global Economy
Economics affects our daily lives and the global environment in many ways. Through the media we are constantly made aware of price increases, interest rate changes, exchange rate movements and balance of payments problems, growth and recessions, standard of living comparisons, regional trading agreements. What does it all mean and how does it all work?
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Offered Semester I & II 2021
ECON 101: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 152 Principles of Economics
Analysis of issues that affect our daily lives, including pricing decisions by firms and their impact on our cost of living; game theory and strategic decision-making; tackling problems of pollution and global warming; and how governments use monetary and fiscal policies to stimulate economic growth and address unemployment and inequality.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ENGL 215: Introduction to Ethnic and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 105 Cultural Studies and Society
A cultural studies approach to social life focuses on the way we experience the world, taking account of what we see, what we hear, what we consume and how we communicate. Sociological theory will be explored through investigating different cultural forms including film, advertising, art, social media, sport, and video games.

Offered Semester I 2021
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
ENSC 101-071: Introduction to the Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENVSCI 101G - Environment, Science and Management
A review of the elementary biology, chemistry and meteorology behind natural and man-made phenomena that change (or destroy) ecosystems. The crude costs and benefits to society of using or protecting natural resources.
Offered Semester I & II 2021
ENTR 167: Seminar: Design Futures (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DESIGN 102G Design Futures
New opportunities are continually emerging in the field of design. This course demonstrates how contemporary design practices have evolved, responded to and influenced change. Students learn how a design approach complements current practice and expands career prospects.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
ENTR 267: Seminar: Innovation Through Design (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INNOVATE 100G Innovation Through Design
Introduces design thinking and develops a user-centred approach to innovation, emphasising the importance of a deep understanding of user needs throughout an iterative ideation and prototyping process. Utilising the maker space at the Unleash Space and a range of digital tools, students will develop practical making and early stage prototyping skills.
Offered Semester I 2021
ENTR 367: Seminar: The Entrepreneurial Mindset (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: INNOVENT 203G
Stimulates new ways of thinking about enterprising behaviour in a multi-disciplinary manner relevant to understanding and addressing real world challenges of today. Introduces skills needed to identify and assess opportunities, solve problems creatively, communicate persuasively, work effectively in teams, and understand individual and organisational impact.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
GEOG 101-071: Physical Geography - Climatic Processes (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 101 Earth Surface Processes and Landforms
Understanding of the functioning of natural systems at the Earth's surface and human interactions with these systems. Examines the operation and interaction between Atmospheric, Hydrological, Ecological and Geomorphic systems. Environmental processes are an integrating theme. Topics include: climate and hydrological systems, ecological processes; surface sediment cycle; and processes governing development and dynamics of major landform types.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
UD's GEOG 101 + 111 are equivalent to UOA's GEOG 101 Offered Semesters I & II 2021
GEOG 102: Human Geography (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 102 Geography of the Human Environment
Examines the relationships among personal geographies and global geographies of uneven development, economic, environmental and socio-cultural change. Using a variety of examples from New Zealand and the world we illustrate the connection between local places and global issues.

Offered Semesters I & II 2021
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
GEOL 107-070: Geology of Dynamic Earth (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EARTHSCI 120 - Planet Earth
Examination of geologic processes that have shaped Earth and life through time, and their impact on modern society. Topics include: earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, meteorites and planets, mass extinctions and evolution of life. A practical introduction to rocks, minerals and fossils provides insights into Earth's past and important modern resources.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Includes a compulsory 1 day weekend field trip to Muriwai Beach (in west of Auckland). UD student will be responsible for paying additional cost. Offered Semester II 2021
GEOL 302: Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EARTHSCI 203 Rock and Minerals
The formation of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, the minerals they contain, and how they can be used to interpret major Earth Science processes such as crustal evolution, volcanism, mountain building, deformation, and sedimentation.
Offered Semester I 2021
HDFS 167: Seminar: Experiencing Technology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EDCURRIC 111 Experiencing Technology
Develops knowledge and understanding of the components of technological literacy as it relates to young children. Develops understanding of appropriate pedagogical strategies to enhance children's learning in technology. Addresses questions such as: What is technological literacy? How can we develop technological literacy in young children? What environments encourage children's exploration of technological experiences?
Could count as HMSV restricted elective, particularly for ECD concentration Course not scheduled in 2021
HDFS 223: Foundations of Child Development (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EDUC 115 Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development
Study of factors influencing children's development and socialisation within the culturally and linguistically diverse context of New Zealand. Research from developmental psychology and from family and parenting will be drawn upon to explore physical, emotional, social, cognitive and language development during childhood and adolescence.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Offered Semester I 2021
JAPN 208-073: Contemporary Japanese Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAPANESE 150 - Exploring Japan
Covers Japanese cultural history from the pre-historic age until the 1990s, and serves as an introduction to contemporary Japan. It deals with such diverse fields as Japanese literature, economy, the political system, Japan's position in the world, popular culture, social structures and gender relations. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
Offered Semester II 2021
JOUR 301: Journalism in a Free Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COMMS 201 Journalism Studies
Explores journalism, communications and the news media, examining the history and contemporary state of such practices from a theoretical, rather than practical, perspective. Students gain knowledge about the profound impact that social, political and technological shifts have had on the field of communications today and discuss their implications for popular, professional and citizen journalism.

Offered Semester I 2021
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
KAAP 430: Exercise Physiology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EXERSCI 201 Exercise Physiology 1
Physiological and biochemical requirements and provision of energy for exercise, recovery and adaptation. Generation and control of muscular force and power, and how the neuromuscular system adapts to its habitual use. Scientific measurement of muscular force, work and power and oxidative metabolism at rest and during exercise. Justification, administration and reporting of experimental procedures.
Offered Semester I 2021
LING 101: Introduction to Linguistics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LINGUIST 100 Introduction to Linguistics
LINGUISTICS 100 is your introduction to the major subfields of Linguistics: phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics and the scientific methodology used to describe them. The human capacity for language makes us unique in the animal world. Linguists seek to explain what exactly "language" is, what its properties are and which of them are universal. Linguistics as a discipline is a relatively recent phenomenon, but records show that our capacity for language has occupied the thoughts of scholars for thousands of years. Like the ancients, modern linguists also want to know how language developed, how it has evolved and why only humans?
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Offered Semester I 2021
LING 102: Language, Mind and Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LINGUIST 101
A survey of three areas: the interaction between language structure and use on the one hand, and social structure and social norms on the other (sociolinguistics); the relationship between linguistic and cultural knowledge (anthropological linguistics); and the inter-relationship of language and other cognitive structures, especially as it is revealed through language acquisition (psycholinguistics).
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Offered Semester I 2021
LLCU 167: Seminar: Introduction to Spoken Maori (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MAORI 103 Introduction to Spoken Maori
An introduction to spoken Maori for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Concentrates on the acquisition of aural and oral skills, developing the ability to understand and speak Maori.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
MAST 200: The Oceans (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MARINE 100/100G The Oceans Around Us
An interdisciplinary approach to understanding the importance of our oceans as the driver of our climate, source of sustenance, and focus of domestic and international political, economic and legal negotiations. It is framed around physical and biological processes in the ocean which raise questions for ocean management in NZ and internationally, allowing real-world debate about the future of the ocean realm.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semester I 2021
MAST 367: Independent Study: Principles of Marine Science (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MARINE 202: Principles of Marine Science
An introduction to the physical and biological structure of the oceans, sea floor, coastlines and the biological communities that inhabit them. Subject matter includes an overview of the nature and scope of marine science globally and within the New Zealand and Auckland contexts. A wide coverage of marine science issues are presented with an emphasis on multidisciplinary examples. No formal prerequisite, although an understanding of Stage I level science is assumed.
Offered Semester I 2021
MATH 221-300: Calculus I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 108 - General Mathematics
A general entry to Mathematics for commerce and the social sciences, following Year 13 Mathematics. MATHS 108 covers selected topics in algebra and calculus and their applications, including: linear functions, linear equations and matrices; functions, equations and inequalities; limits and continuity; differential calculus of one and two variables; integral calculus of one variable.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
MATH 222: Calculus II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 208 General Mathematics 2
This sequel to MATHS 108 features applications from the theory of multi-variable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations to real-life problems in statistics, economics, finance, computer science, and operations research. Matlab is used to develop analytical and numerical methods of solving problems.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
MATH 241-070: Analytic Geometry & Calculus A (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 102 - Functioning in Mathematics (and intro to Calculus)
Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives. Polynomial, rational, exponential, hyperbolic, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Definite and indefinite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Simple differential equations (separable ODE, linear ODE). ODE models leading to exponential growth and decay.
Prerequisite: MATH 117, or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both MATH241 and MATH221.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
MATH 267: Seminar: Algebra and Calculus 3 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATH 253 Algebra and Calculus 3
A sequel to MATHS 250, further developing and bringing together linear algebra and calculus. Students will learn about quadratic forms, projections, spectral decomposition, methods of multicriteria optimisation, double, triple and line integrals, Green’s theorem and applications.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
MATH 302: Ordinary Differential Equations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 199 Advancing Mathematics 1
This course is part of the Young Scholars Programme and is designed for high-achieving students currently at high school. The numerical computing environment MATLAB is used to study beautiful mathematics from algebra, analysis, applied mathematics and combinatorics. Students will learn to write mathematical proofs and create mathematical models to find solutions to real-world problems.
Restrictions: Prerequisite: UOA Departmental approval
Offered Semester I 2021
MATH 353: Engineering Mathematics III (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 162 Computational Mathematics
An introduction to computational mathematics and programming in MATLAB. The course will introduce some basic concepts in computational mathematics and give applications that include cryptography, difference equations, stochastic modelling, graph theory and Markov chains.
Prerequisite: Must meet UOA MATH pre-reqs
MATH 353: Engineering Mathematics III (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 162 Computational Mathematics
An introduction to computational mathematics and programming in MATLAB. The course will introduce some basic concepts in computational mathematics and give applications that include cryptography, difference equations, stochastic modelling, graph theory and Markov chains.
Cross Listed with MATH 426 Offered Semesters I & II 2021
MUSC 205-071: Music of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 234 - Popular Music of the Pacific
From hip hop to reggae to pop, this course explores Pacific popular music genre, artists and songs as well as relevant musical techniques, modes of distribution and processes of fusion and change. It probes the positions and possibilities of Pasifika pop musics by discussing critical questions about culture, authenticity, modernisation, consumerism, identity and musical (ex)change.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
NTDT 200: Nutrition Concepts (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POPHLTH 206 Life Cycle Nutrition
Provides students with a general background and introduction to: the New Zealand diet; food preparation and meal patterns; dietary requirements during pregnancy and lactation, childhood and adolescence, lifestyle changes, maturity and ageing.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semester I 2021
PHIL 102: Intro to Philosophy (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 100 Mind, Knowledge and Reality
Metaphysics deals with fundamental problems about the nature of the world and human beings, for example, questions about the existence of God, the nature of time, the relationship between mind and body and the nature of identity and the self. The theory of knowledge studies the sources, limits and justification of human knowledge and understanding as distinct from opinion or belief.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Offered Semester I 2021
PHIL 105-070: Critical Thinking (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking
Dialogue, argument and discussion are analysed. Distinctions are drawn between persuasive, logically good and materially good arguments. The focus is on well reasoned persuasive dialogue, and mistakes in persuasive reasoning. Topics include the point of an argument, strength of arguments, fallacious reasoning, relevance of reasons, and burden of proof.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
PHIL 205: Logic (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 101 Introduction to Logic
Logic is the study of argument. This course aims to provide an understanding of central logical notions, such as consistency and inconsistency, logical truth, and, most importantly, what it means for an argument to be valid or invalid, sound or unsound. The course examines two main logical systems, propositional and predicate logic, and shows how these formal systems are used to analyse and evaluate arguments.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
PHYS 133-070: Introduction to Astronomy (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASTRO 100G - Planets, Stars and Galaxies
The story of our place in the Universe. Key topics are the exploration of the solar system, searches for planets around other stars, the structure and evolution of stars and galaxies, high-energy astrophysics, and the origin and overall properties of the Universe. No background in physics or mathematics is assumed.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Not for credit for those who have taken PHYS144.
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
PHYS 201-071: Introductory Physics I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 120 - Advancing Physics I
For students progressing in physical science. Key topics are mechanics, energy, rotation, oscillations, waves and thermodynamics. This is a calculus based course, focusing on fundamental principles, problem solving and hands-on exercises.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
PHYS 202-071: Introductory Physics II (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 121
For students progressing in physical science. Key topics are electrostatics, electromagnetism, circuits, optics, relativity and quantum mechanics. This is a calculus based course, focusing on fundamental principles, problem solving and hands-on exercises. Recommended preparation is PHYSICS 120 or NCEA Level 3 Physics and Mathematics, or equivalent.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Offered Semesters I & II 2021
POSC 240-073/083: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 106 - Global Politics
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Required of all World Scholars in Auckland. Honors section is available.
POSC 435: Political Thought II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 209 - Modern Political Thought
What should the state do and what should it keep out of? Focussing on key debates in modern political theory, topics will vary year from year and may include political authority and the rule of law; freedom, coercion, and manipulation; indigenous rights and the welfare state; paternalism; the ethics of war, global justice and feminism.
Prerequisite: Previous POSC/IR coursework required
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Freshman can take this course, although though it not is advised to be taken until after POSC 285.
RUSS 105: Russian I - Elementary (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: RUSSIAN 100 Beginners' Russian 1
A beginner's course using multi-media (computer) materials that presumes no prior knowledge of Russian, with emphasis on a range of language skills – listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and the essential grammar of Russian.
Students must submit a Language Ability Declaration form online when enrolling. Upon arrival to UOA, student will interview or take a placement test to ensure student is prepared for level. http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/en/for/current-students/undergraduate/enrolment/first-time-enrolment-in-language-courses.html Offered Semester I 2021
THEA 102-070: Introduction to Performance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DRAMA 100 - Taking the Stage: Performance & Presentation Skills
Survey of performance training techniques for the non-minor. Topics may include elements of voice, improvisation, movement, dance, and character analysis and portrayal.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Does not count toward Theatre minor Offered Semester I 2021
UNIV 373-035: Study Abroad - Auckland, New Zealand (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Restrictions: Restricted to UD World Scholar Admits
WOMS 208: Current Issues in Sexuality and Gender Lecture Series (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GENDER 208 Thinking Gender
Interdisciplinary examination of feminist theories of gender and sexuality. Focuses on contemporary issues, debates, and practices, while grounding them in foundational theories and investigating how these issues and debates play out across disciplines and practices. Examples include the perils of identity politics, tensions between feminist and queer theories, the politics of representation, and gender justice in a globalised world.
Offered Semester I 2021
WOMS 250: Topics in International Women's Studies (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GENDER 101 Gender: Global and Local
Develops an understanding of key concepts that underlie gender analysis, and how they are expressed in politics, culture and society. Examines the meaning of gender across a range of subjects and issues on the global stage and in our everyday lives.
Offered Semester I 2021
Requirements
World Scholars - Auckland is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
Costs
Other important things to note:
  • CGPS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason.
Tuition charged to World Scholars is the same as that charged to other students at the University of Delaware. New rates are released every July.

The World Scholars Program Fee is a one-time fee that includes housing, dining, international insurance, select excursions and activities abroad, as well as resources to support your success provided by UD and our partner institutions. The program fee also serves as the foundation for the resources and opportunities that World Scholars will receive for the duration of their four-year participation in the UD World Scholars Program.

Scholars should reference the Financial Aid Award Notice, a packet received after admission, for their custom scholarship and need-based aid information. Note: Financial aid (federal, state and UD scholarships/grants, along with loans) is split evenly between the fall and spring semesters, with half of the overall award supporting program costs in the spring. Tuition payments must be made in accordance with the University of Delaware tuition and fee payment schedule.

To enroll as a Class of 2025 UD World Scholar, students must pay two enrollment deposits by May 1, 2021 -- $500 to confirm enrollment at UD and $500 to confirm enrollment in the World Scholars Program. Both deposit amounts are non-refundable and are deducted from the final University bill.

Other important things to note:
  • The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onSeptember 20, 2021
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $500.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Amy Greenwald Foley
Associate Director
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
agfoley@udel.edu
Meghan Gladle
Study Abroad Coordinator
Clayton Hall, 100 David Hollowell Drive, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-6441
gladlem@udel.edu

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.