Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[109]
Fall 2023: World Scholars - Auckland, New Zealand
July 11, 2023 - November 14, 2023
This program is closed. Please contact the faculty director for more information.

Natural Wonders of Rotorua, NZ
Meetings
Orientation Meetings - attend ALL of the following:
06/16/2023 8:30 AM - 3:30 PMWorld Scholars Pre-Departure Orientation
Program Notes
This program's deadline has been changed to 07/05/2023.
World Scholars - Auckland is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program.
Program Description

The University of Delaware World Scholars Program is a four-year program for internationalizing a student's undergraduate career. Choosing from a wide range of majors, World Scholars are supported in their studies with internationally-focused academics, experiences, and opportunities that will prepare them to live and work anywhere in the world.

Class of 2027 UD World Scholars will study abroad twice, including fall semester of their freshman year in Greece, Italy, Spain or New Zealand, and in any of 40+ destinations during their junior year.

Scholars heading to New Zealand will spend their freshman fall at our partner institution, the University of Auckland (UOA). Stretching across 40 acres in the centre of the city of Auckland, the University campus is integrated into the heart of the city life. Harbour views and nearby parks provide a scenic study setting, just minutes’ walk from the city centre’s shopping and entertainment district. With a population of 1.5 million, 40% of whom were born overseas, city life in Auckland is a blend of cultures, cuisines and nature. Considered one of the top "most livable cities in the world," Auckland has two harbours and 3,700kms of coastline, and is the warmest and one of the sunniest of New Zealand’s cities.

UD World Scholars live in an on-campus residence hall within walking distance of classes, University amenities, the dining hall, and city center. Scholars will reside in a traditional residence hall with double rooms, shared baths & on-site dining hall. The meal plan includes three meals on weekdays & two meals on weekend days with ability to take away meals for day trips and excursions.

UOA's facilities include a walkable campus providing spaces to study or catch up with new friends. The Kate Edgar Information Commons is located at the heart of campus offering easy access to the on-campus health and counseling centers, a pharmacy, IT support services, the Munchy Mart, as well as an open air cafe and food carts. Across the street students can utilize the library and academic support services. The UOA international office is located in the Alfred Nathan House, just beyond, providing a walk-in center for questions or concerns. Surrounding these student service buildings are the academic classroom buildings where students can find faculty offices and classrooms.

As a research university the University of Auckland is committed to research based teaching.UOA has nearly 2,000 faculty including researchers, scholars and creative artists at the forefront of their areas of expertise, both nationally and internationally. In fact, many write the leading textbooks on the subjects they teach. UOA's faculty are committed to helping students get the most from their study through incorporating the latest findings and perspectives related to the discipline. Opportunities to learn in a variety of research-related ways include projects, case studies, problem-based learning or designing and conducting experiments. Outside of classes, students will be able to attend free research seminars, lectures and events to hear presentations about current research projects. The University of Auckland aims to assist students in developing the following capabilities: disciplinary knowledge and practice, critical thinking, problem solving, independence and integrity, social and environmental responsibility.

World Scholars will need to apply for a NZ student visa; which is free. CGPS staff will assist students with the visa application process.

The Program Fee includes housing, medical insurance, some meals, airport transfers in Auckland for those traveling on the recommended flights, orientation week activities, numerous excursions throughout the fall, opening and closing celebrations and full access to all UOAs facilities and activities.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Auckland. Students who wish to travel with the UD representative must book the recommended group flights and are encouraged to do so via StudentUniverse:

Sun, 9 Jul - United Airlines 1676 - 6h 12m
Departing: Newark Liberty Airport (EWR) at 4:45 pm
Arriving: San Francisco Intl Airport, (SFO) at 7:57 pm

Sun, 9 Jul - United Airlines 6755 - Operated By Air New Zealand - 13h 0m
Departing: San Francisco Intl Airport, (SFO) at 10:00 pm
Arriving: Auckland Airport (AKL) at 6:00 am (on the 11 Jul)

Tue, 14 Nov - United Airlines 916 - 12h 15m
Departing: Auckland Airport (AKL) at 3:50 pm
Arriving: San Francisco Intl Airport, (SFO) at 7:05 am

Tue, 14 Nov - United Airlines 391 - 5h 23m
Departing: San Francisco Intl Airport, (SFO) at 9:30 am
Arriving: Newark Liberty Airport (EWR) at 5:53 pm

Standard Economy - $2,503.55 estimate (1 checked bag included)

ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcome and encouraged to study abroad. Before making the decision to study abroad, prospective students with disabilities should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some study abroad locations may differ from the United States. Review our Diversity Abroad information with family. You may also contact World Scholar Program leadership to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
Honors credit may be available. Check with the faculty director and the Honors program for approval (check before departure).
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
All courses are taught in English and meet UD graduation requirements.

Scholars will enroll in four courses during their first semester abroad. All first-year World Scholars are required to enroll in ANTH 230: Peoples of the World, which meets the University Breadth requirements for Social & Behavioral Sciences (CAS Group C) Honors credit may be available.

Please note that students must register for a lecture and tutorial section for each course selected. See additional requirements for language study, including submission of UOA Language Declaration form.

Please note that the courses listed below have been reviewed by UD departments and approved as UD course equivalencies.
ANTH 230-070/080: Peoples of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MAORI 130G - Te Ao Māori: The Māori World
An introduction to Maori analyses of topics that are often discussed and sometimes controversial, and that continue to shape contemporary life in New Zealand. Topics include aspects of world view, philosophy and social organisation; the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Waitangi and European immigration; and contemporary issues including Treaty claims, ownership of the foreshore and seabed and constitutional issues.



An honors section is avalable for this course - section 080.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
Required of all World Scholars.
ANTH 267-070: Seminar (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PACIFIC 105 - The Contemporary Pacific
Explores the ways in which Pacific peoples frame their contemporary world in the context of globalisation. It also examines factors which shape contemporary Pacific life and popular culture as well as some of the challenges emanating from how Pacific peoples construct and make sense of their own and others’ historical, political, socio-cultural, economic and religious worlds.
ASIA 367: Seminar: New Zealand & Asia (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASIAN 140 New Zealand and Asia
BISC 207-071: Introductory Biology I (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOSCI 101 - Life! Origins and Mechanisms
Questions what Life is and explores its machinery. Speculates on how Life arose from the flow and capture of solar energy, to power growth, movement, replication and storage of generic information. Then, describes how genes interact with environments, and how mutations can be catastrophic or transformational. These processes underpin life as we know it.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Class has an associated lab (several timetable available)
CHEM 103-101: General Chemistry (+ CHEM133 071L lab) (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 120 - Chemistry of the Material World
Matter, the changes that matter undergoes, and the laws governing these changes, with greater emphasis on atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, and energy relationships. Properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. Includes 42 hours of laboratory work.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: COREQ: MATH-115.
Students whose MATH Placement Examination score placed them in MATH-221 or higher need not take a MATH course coincident with CHEM-103. For majors in the physical and natural sciences, mathematics and engineering.
CHEM 107-070: General Chemistry for Life Sciences (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHEM 110 - Chemistry of the Living World
Principles of chemistry, with applications to biology and other life sciences. Includes weekly laboratory work and discussion sections. COREQ: MATH114 or higher. MATH115 or MATH117 strongly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
CHIN 106-070: Chinese II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 101 Beginning Modern Chinese 2
Continues to develop students’ Chinese proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing skills and cultural literacy.
CHIN 200-070: Chinese Grammar and Composition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 201 Intermediate Modern Chinese 2
Further develops students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and introduces the formal register of the language. By the end of the course students can handle daily situations with increasing accuracy.
DANC 267: Introduction to Dance (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DANCE 101 Introduction to Dance & Creative Process
ECON 101-072: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ECON 152 Principles of Economics
Analysis of issues that affect our daily lives, including pricing decisions by firms and their impact on our cost of living; game theory and strategic decision-making; tackling problems of pollution and global warming; and how governments use monetary and fiscal policies to stimulate economic growth and address unemployment and inequality.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BUSINESS 115 or ECON 151 or 16 credits in NCEA Level 3 Economics with a Merit average including standard 91399 (Demonstrate understanding of the efficiency of market equilibrium), or a scholarship pass in Economics, or B grade in CIE Economics or 4 out of 7 in Economics (HL) in IB
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ENGL 209-071: Introduction to the Novel (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENGLISH 102 Great Books: Seduction & Betrayal
Representative masterworks of fiction, emphasizing those of Europe and

America.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: ENGL110
ENGL 217: Introduction to Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDIA 101 - Film Studies
Not Offered in Fall 2023



Commerce, high art and popular culture on the celluloid strip. An approach to film through an eclectic array of tools: formal analysis (mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing), theoretical constructs (auteurism, identification), and reading films as cultural expressions that betray social tensions of their time and place of production. Weekly screenings and analysis of films from a variety of time periods, genres and national cinemas.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENSC 101-071: Introduction to the Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ENVSCI 101G - Environment, Science and Management
A review of the elementary biology, chemistry and meteorology behind natural and man-made phenomena that change (or destroy) ecosystems. The crude costs and benefits to society of using or protecting natural resources.
GEOG 101-071: Physical Geography - Climatic Processes (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 101 Earth Surface Processes and Landforms
Understanding of the functioning of natural systems at the Earth's surface and human interactions with these systems. Examines the operation and interaction between Atmospheric, Hydrological, Ecological and Geomorphic systems. Environmental processes are an integrating theme. Topics include: climate and hydrological systems, ecological processes; surface sediment cycle; and processes governing development and dynamics of major landform types.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
UD's GEOG 101 + 111 are equivalent to UOA's GEOG 101
GEOG 235-072: Conservation of Natural Resources (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GEOG 205 - Environment & Society
Physical, social and economic problems involved in integrating resource management and maintaining environmental quality.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
GEOG 267-070: Seminar (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BIOSCI 100 - Antarctica: The Frozen Continent
A general introduction to Antarctica and its environs including the Southern Ocean and the sub-Antarctic islands. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of Antarctica and how resident plants, animals and micro-organisms have adapted to cope with the extreme environment. Specific topics to be addressed include: the history of Antarctic exploration and its impact on the development of Antarctic science, Antarctic ecosystems, Antarctica as a wilderness region, and the impact of humans including the exploitation of resources and the effects of pollution. This course is suitable for students with both science and non-science backgrounds.
GEOL 107-070: Geology of Dynamic Earth (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EARTHSCI 120 - Planet Earth
Examination of geologic processes that have shaped Earth and life through time, and their impact on modern society. Topics include: earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, meteorites and planets, mass extinctions and evolution of life. A practical introduction to rocks, minerals and fossils provides insights into Earth's past and important modern resources.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Includes a compulsory 1-day weekend field trip to Muriwai Beach (in the west of Auckland). UD students will be responsible for paying the additional cost.
HIST 365-071: Topics in Asian & Pacific History (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HISTORY 104 - Pacific History: An Introduction
A survey of the history of the Pacific from 1000 to the present. Includes indigenous histories, colonisation and post-colonisation, cross-cultural encounters, warfare, and environmental change.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HLPR 233-071: Introduction to Global Health (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDSCI 101G - Environmental Threats to Human Health
Introduces key diseases and conditions which affect the health of different populations including basic biological and varying social aspects which cause major global health issues. Emphasis on the developing world, the health of the poor, and possible solutions. Cross-listed with UAPP 233.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
UD course is cross listed with UAPP 233
JAPN 106-070: Japanese ll - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: Japanese 131 Japanese Language 1B
Continued practice in the aural, oral, reading, and writing skills of contemporary Japanese, including the identification and reproduction of basic Kanji characters. Introduction to formality levels and critical verb forms needed for more advanced communication. Media Center resources utilized.
Prerequisite: JAPN 105.
Restrictions: Two to three years of high school Japanese acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
JAPN 208-070: Contemporary Japanese Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: JAPANESE 150 - Exploring Japan
Covers Japanese cultural history from the pre-historic age until the 1990s, and serves as an introduction to contemporary Japan. It deals with such diverse fields as Japanese literature, economy, the political system, Japan's position in the world, popular culture, social structures and gender relations. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Multicultural
LLCU 106-070: Modern Language II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: KOREAN 111 - Korean for Beginners 2
Further develops the basic proficiency in Korean necessary to communicate in limited situations. Uses a range of exercises and activities to develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Introduces distinctive aspects of contemporary Korean culture related to language-use situations.
Students must submit a Language Ability Declaration form online when registering. http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/en/for/current-students/undergraduate/enrolment/first-time-enrolment-in-language-courses.html
LLCU 167-078: Seminar: Introduction to Spoken Maori (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MAORI 103 Introduction to Spoken Maori
An introduction to spoken Maori for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Concentrates on the acquisition of aural and oral skills, developing the ability to understand and speak Maori.
LLCU 167-074: Seminar: Korean Society & Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: Korean 120 Korean Society and Culture
Lecture
LLCU 267-071: Rethinking China (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CHINESE 130 Rethinking China
MATH 221-070: Calculus l (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: Math 108 General Mathematics 1
Topics include functions, graphing functions, limits, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration, and techniques of integration. Business applications are emphasized.
Prerequisite: MATH 115, or MATH 117 or an acceptable score (determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences) on the Math Placement Exam. More information on the Math Placement Exam is available at https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Students who received credit in MATH 222, MATH 232, MATH 241, MATH 242, or MATH 243 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
MATH 241-070: Analytic Geometry & Calculus A (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 130 Calculus
Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives. Polynomial, rational, exponential, hyperbolic, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Definite and indefinite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Simple differential equations (separable ODE, linear ODE). ODE models leading to exponential growth and decay.
Prerequisite: MATH 117 or acceptable score on the Math Placement Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement for more information.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Students who received credit in MATH 242 or MATH 243 are not eligible to take this course without permission.
MATH 241-072: Analytic Geometry & Calculus A (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MATHS 102 - Functioning in Mathematics (and intro to Calculus)
Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives. Polynomial, rational, exponential, hyperbolic, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Definite and indefinite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Simple differential equations (separable ODE, linear ODE). ODE models leading to exponential growth and decay.
Prerequisite: MATH 117, or students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placment Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See www.math.udel.edu/placement for more information.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
Restrictions: Credit cannot be received for both MATH241 and MATH221.
MUSC 205-071: Music of the World (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ANTHRO 234 Popular Music of the Pacific
urvey of non-Western world musical cultures utilizing textbook, reprinted reserve articles, films and in-class performance/demonstrations. Goal is the understanding and appreciation of various world musics.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
PHIL 105-072: Critical Thinking (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking
Dialogue, argument and discussion are analysed. Distinctions are drawn between persuasive, logically good and materially good arguments. The focus is on well reasoned persuasive dialogue, and mistakes in persuasive reasoning. Topics include the point of an argument, strength of arguments, fallacious reasoning, relevance of reasons, and burden of proof.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 205-070: Logic (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHIL 101 "Introduction to Logic"
Concepts and techniques of elementary symbolic logic: truth and consistency of sentences, validity and soundness of arguments; translation of English sentences into a formal language, construction of truth tables and the use of a system of natural deduction to prove the validity of deductive arguments.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 133-070: Introduction to Astronomy (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ASTRO 100/100G Planets, Stars and Galaxies
Objects of the universe from the earth to galaxies. How the universal laws that govern them; e.g., gravity and electromagnetic radiation, permit us to learn their nature from quantitative observations. Telescopic observations, visual and electronic, included in the laboratory.
PHYS 201-071: Introductory Physics I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 120 - Advancing Physics I
For students progressing in physical science. Key topics are mechanics, energy, rotation, oscillations, waves and thermodynamics. This is a calculus based course, focusing on fundamental principles, problem solving and hands-on exercises.
Prerequisite: MUST ALSO ENROLL IN PHYS221 Introductory Physics Laboratory I for one credit.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 202-070: Introductory Physics II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 121
For students progressing in physical science. Key topics are electrostatics, electromagnetism, circuits, optics, relativity and quantum mechanics. This is a calculus based course, focusing on fundamental principles, problem solving and hands-on exercises. Recommended preparation is PHYSICS 120 or NCEA Level 3 Physics and Mathematics, or equivalent.
Prerequisite: MUST ALSO ENROLL IN PHYS222 Introductory Physics Laboratory II for one credit.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Math/Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group D
PHYS 267-070: Physics Seminar (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PHYSICS 160 - Physics for the Life Sciences
Designed for students intending to advance in the biomedical and life sciences, this course is focused on physical principles relevant to biological systems. Key topics are motion, waves, thermal physics, electricity and instrumentation. The course is primarily algebra-based and includes lectures, laboratories and tutorials. Recommended preparation is NCEA Level 2 Physics and Mathematics, or equivalent.
POSC 309-076: Political Culture by Country: New Zealand Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: POLITICS 107 - New Zealand Politics
An introduction to understanding who governs New Zealand and in whose interests. Topics include national identity, institutions of government, leadership, voting and elections, the place of Maori within the political system, parties and political participation. The course draws on current research in NZ politics and provides knowledge that can be applied to a variety of careers, including law, business and public service.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
SOCI 267-074: General Sociology Elective (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOCIOL 101G - Understanding Aotearoa New Zealand
Provides an introduction to the sociological analysis of New Zealand society. Looks at familiar events, institutions, social processes from a sociological point of view and offers ways to understand them in new and different ways. Focuses on the structure of New Zealand society and on social and political changes which affect the lives of New Zealanders and shape their society.
SPAN 106-071: Spanish II - Elementary/Intermediate (4 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPANISH 105 Beginners' Spanish 2
Completion of basic Spanish. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of

speaking, listening, reading and writing.
THEA 102-070: Introduction to Performance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DRAMA 100 Presentation and Performance Skills: Taking the Stage
Survey of performance training techniques for the non-minor. Topics may include elements of voice, improvisation, movement, dance, and character analysis and portrayal.
UAPP 233-071: Introduction to Global Health (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MEDSCI 101G - Environmental Threats to Human Health
ntroduces key diseases and conditions which affect the health of different populations including basic biological and varying social aspects which cause major global health issues. Emphasis on the developing world, the health of the poor, and possible solutions. Cross-listed with HLPR 233.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Multicultural
UNIV 373-043: Study Abroad - Auckland, New Zealand (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Restrictions: Restricted to UD World Scholar Admits
Requirements
World Scholars - Auckland is an exclusive opportunity for students admitted to the University of Delaware World Scholars Program. Full-time enrollment status (12 or more credits) during the program is also required.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by Zoom.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please email a copy of your official transcript to the Program Coordinator.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
Other important things to note:
  • CGPS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason.
Tuition charged to World Scholars is the same as that charged to other students at the University of Delaware. New rates are released every July.

The World Scholars Program Fee is a one-time fee that includes housing, dining, international insurance, select excursions and activities abroad, as well as resources to support your success provided by UD and our partner institutions. The program fee also serves as the foundation for the resources and opportunities that World Scholars will receive for the duration of their four-year participation in the UD World Scholars Program.

Scholars should reference the Financial Aid Award Notice, a packet received after admission, for their custom scholarship and need-based aid information. Note: Financial aid (federal, state and UD scholarships/grants, along with loans) is split evenly between the fall and spring semesters, with half of the overall award supporting program costs in the fall. Tuition payments must be made in accordance with the University of Delaware tuition and fee payment schedule.

To enroll as a UD World Scholar, students must pay two enrollment deposits by May 1 of their enrollment spring -- $500 to confirm enrollment at UD and $500 to confirm enrollment in the World Scholars Program. Both deposit amounts are non-refundable and are deducted from the final University bill.

Other important things to note:
  • The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • IGS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onJuly 05, 2023
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Cesar Caro
Study Abroad Coordinator
302-831-3212
ccaro@udel.edu
Cesar will accompany students to NZ for 23F start of the semester and will serve as the main WSP contact for participants.
Callie Zimmerman
Study Abroad Coordinator
Elliott Hall, 26 East Main Street, Newark, DE, 19716
302-831-6441
czimmerm@udel.edu
File Downloads
UOA Course Enrolment Help Session
Disability Support Services Information
NZ Visa Checklist 23F
Student Universe Flight Information- WS Auckland 23F
NZ Student Visa Application- Sample
Pre-Departure Checklist NZ 23F
PDO Presentation - Health, Safety, & Well-Being Abroad
PDO Presentation - An Intro to Your Semester Abroad in NZ
PDO Presentation - UD Finances for 23F
Pre-Departure Handbook (from PDO) - Auckland

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.