Program Information
P-SP=[0], P-TAP=[0], P-PC=[0], St-SP=[0], TA-TAP=[0], DDipl-DDA=[0], Pcl-PC=[0], Sess-PC=[0], Sess-SP=[0], Sess-TAP=[0], Sess-P=[115]
Spring 2025: Rome, Italy
January 07, 2025 - May 02, 2025 (dates are tentative)

Meetings
Interest Meetings:
05/01/2024 5:00 PM - 6:00 PMZoom https://udel.zoom.us/j/92937501488?from=addon
05/09/2024 4:00 PM - 5:00 PMZoom https://udel.zoom.us/j/91563275760?from=addon
Program Notes
Important Program Info:
Minimum GPA 2.67
Visa Required/Fee Yes/ additional cost of aprox $130
Internship/ Fee Yes/ No additional fee
Move In Date January
Orientation January
First Day of Classes January
Drop/Add January
Spring Break March
Move Out Date May

PASSPORT:
All applicants must have a valid passport by the program’s application deadline. Your passport’s expiration date must be more than six months after the program ends. If you do not have a current passport, apply through the U.S. State Department. It takes an average of 10-13 weeks (3-4 months) to process a passport.

VISA:
Visa is required. Study Abroad office offers batch visa applications. Students are responsible for visa fees (approximately $100) and the "Declaration of Presence" fee (aprox $30) required by the Italian government. A valid passport is required to apply for a visa. The visa process requires you to surrender your passport for October and November while visa application is being processed.

COVID:
Please review the CGPS COVID-19 Updates page before applying to a study abroad program for information about COVID-19 related travel requirements and policies for UD study abroad.

Traveling and studying abroad during a global pandemic poses new challenges and requires accepting a higher level of uncertainty than in the past. Students who choose to study abroad at this time must be prepared to adapt to the evolving situation and must take responsibility to act in accordance with the rules, regulations, and recommendations of UD, their program leadership, and legal authorities of their home and host country. Due to the rapidly changing and unpredictable global and local response to COVID-19, these rules, regulations and recommendations are subject to change at any time.

The University will continue to monitor the ongoing situation with COVID-19 (coronavirus) as we approach the departure date for this program. Please reach out to your program coordinator or faculty director with questions and continue to monitor the UD coronavirus webpage for updates. If UD decides to cancel a study abroad program, we will communicate directly with affected students.
Program Description
Study in La Città Eterna - The Eternal City. Rome, the capital of Italy, is a sprawling, cosmopolitan city with nearly 3,000 years of globally influential art, architecture and culture on display. This UD semester program is co-hosted by John Cabot University (JCU), an accredited, degree-granting liberal arts institution enrolling over 1700 students from around the globe. JCU’s location in the Trastevere section of Rome, on the Tiber River and close to central Rome, makes it ideally situated for students wishing to live and learn amidst a unique blend of the ancient and the contemporary.

John Cabot University maintains three campuses in Trastevere. Enter the Guarini Campus through the Porta Settimiana, part of the original Aurelian Wall, dating from the third century. Guarini is located on the former grounds of the Accademia dei Lincei (national science academy), where Galileo was once a member. The Academy is now located across the street from Guarini. Here you'll find classrooms; the auditorium (concerts, plays, films & lectures); the Frohring Library, one of Italy's most comprehensive English language libraries (study rooms, multimedia lab and a new media production facilty); a meditation garden, administrative offices; and two classic Italian terraces where students gather to socialize and study. A five-minute walk from Guarini are the Tiber Campus and the Critelli Campus. Tiber is a state-of-the-art building with smart classrooms, a student lounge, the dining hall, the Student Activities office, and other student services. The Caroline Critelli Guarini Campus hosts classrooms, administrative offices, and a physics laboratory. All John Cabot University campuses are fully wireless and equipped with 21st-century learning technologies. JCU’s status as a fully accredited secondary educational institution means that it offers an array of services similar to those found on U.S. campuses: student clubs, sport and recreational activities, fitness center, computer labs, libraries, cultural and social events, counseling and medical services, and a residence life staff.

This semester-long study abroad program is designed for undergraduate students regardless of major. Courses are taught by JCU’s multi-national faculty, many of whom were educated in the United States. Instructional methods and grading are based on the U.S. system. Instruction is in English, with the exception of Italian language courses. Some courses include out-of-class activities throughout central Rome, which may require an additional fee.


Housing:
Students will be housed in double or triple rooms in fully furnished JCU-leased apartments, with three to nine other JCU students. Apartments are within approximately a 30 minute walk or up to 30 minutes by public transportation, and include a fully furnished kitchen, bed linens, a washing machine, weekly cleaning service, and security. Resident Assistants also reside in all JCU apartment buildings. Some apartments are situated in buildings occupied by local residents, providing a perfect opportunity for meaningful contact with locals. All students are required to stay in program sponsored housing, independent housing arrangements are not allowed by UD or the program partners.
***Starting with Summer 2024, John Cabot University will have a Gender Inclusive Housing (GIH) option in our housing application.

Experiental Learning:
This semester in Rome program offers opportunities for more immersive experiences such as for-credit and zero-credit internships and community engagement. Contact the program coordinator for more details about these, or see JCU Community Service, Italy Reads, Italy Starts or JCU internships. Please note: internship placement requires application and interview and is not guaranteed, see course UNIV 362 Internship.


The Program Fee includes housing, international medical insurance, airport transfer upon arrival in Rome, orientation week activities, and full access to JCU facilities and services.

The Program Fee does NOT include airfare, meals, return trip to airport, additional fees for some courses (see JCU course cataloge.) Students will need to budget for meals, cell phone, books and supplies, excursions, and other personal expenses.

Upon acceptance to the program, students will be given recommended flight itineraries for traveling together. See the Cost section below for estimated airfare. The program officially begins when students arrive in Rome.
ACCESSIBILITY: Students with disabilities are welcomed and encouraged to study abroad, but should be aware that accessibility and accommodation in some program locations may differ from the United States. Transit systems and legacy building construction practices may not meet U.S. accessibility standards, and alternative access to public transportation, buildings, or public sites cannot be guaranteed. Review these questions with the Office of Disability Support Services to determine whether this program can meet your accommodation needs.
Program Courses
Students must enroll in all credit-bearing courses for a grade. Only the UNIV (zero credit) course may be taken pass/fail. Audit registration is not permitted on UD Travel Study. Please refer to the University Catalog to verify requirements and prerequisites
All students must enroll in at least 12 credits, as well as the 0-credit UNIV course.
All courses are taught in English (with the exception of foreign language courses)

Students may take up to 17 credits. An overload requires permission from John Cabot U.

This program offers Internships (see UNIV 362)

Please note: Some courses may have additional fees that will be billed directly to students. JCU course cataloge lists the fees.

Please note: Courses offered are subject to change as the host institution’s schedule may change.

Please note: Courses ending in 67 (example SOCI 267) may only meet an elective requirment
ACCT 207-071: Accounting I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ACCT 201 Financial Accounting
An introduction to financial accounting. Topics: the accounting cycle, merchandise accounting, accounting procedures for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant and equipment, stocks and bonds.
Restrictions: Not open to freshmen.
ART 129-070: Design in Visual Arts (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 101 Introduction to Graphic Design
Introduction to art and design principles within creative problem solving assignments using 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional media. Design organization criteria, technical craftsmanship, and artistic objectives interconnect to support production of original expressive statements.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to nonmajors and nonminors only.
ART 180-070: Digital Photography for Non-majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 289 Digital Photography
This course is meant for students who wish to deepen their knowledge of digital photography. It will review basic camera functions, lighting, principles of composition and pictorial dynamics, color interactions, and introduce methods of the elaboration of photos on the computer. Each student must be equipped with a digital camera with a wide lens or a 3x or greater optical zoom, and camera functions selector which includes M,A,S,P. A tripod and modern single-lens reflex (SLR) digital cameras with interchangeable lenses are highly recommended.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: Open to non-majors only.
ART 204-073: Media/Design/Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 111 Introduction to Visual Communication
In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics; the historical practice of looking; visual media analysis; spectatorship; historic evolution of visual codes; impact of visual technologies; media literacy; information graphics literacy; and global visual culture.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
ART 230-070: Figure Drawing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 212 Figure Drawing
Drawing the human figure through direct observation. Emphasizes strong fundamental skills, experimentation and imagination. Working with an assortment of traditional mixed media, students explore line,value,color and perspective to interpret form and space while developing original content.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 231-070: Introduction to Painting (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 204 Painting
An exploration of beginning oil painting methods and material through both traditional and conceptual painting ideas, providing the student with a foundation for discovering their unique potential for self-expression.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 233-070: Drawing as Study (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 110 Drawing - Rome Sketchbook
This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ART 285-070: Core Moving Images (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 215: Video Art
Introduction to digital video, animation, and sound recording. Explore time-based uses of the camera and computer through hands-on projects. Explores cultural and historical fascination with time, motion, and light through screenings, lectures, and readings.
Prerequisite: ART284
ART 432-070: Painting Studio (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AS 304 Advanced Painting and Drawing
Provides an atmosphere of support for a maturing studio practice. Emphasis on evolving a painting or material awareness in the pursuit of a more personal artistic direction and style.
ARTH 101-070: Visual Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 141 World Art I: Visual Culture of the Ancient World
Explores the ways we make, perceive and experience images and artifacts. Students will hone their skills in seeing, analyzing historical models and critically engaging in discussions of visual art and material cultures in selected eras and civilizations around the world.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Multicultural
ARTH 199-070: Topics in Art History: Rome, Ostia, and Pompeii (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 190 Cities, Towns and Villas: Rome, Ostia, Pompeii
Rome, Ostia and Pompeii are three of the best preserved archaeological sites in the world. Through their study, we are able to comprehend the physical and social nature of Roman cities and how they transformed over the course of centuries. We explore the subjects of urban development, public and private buildings, economic and social history, and art incorporated into urban features (houses, triumphal monuments, etc.). In Rome, we focus primarily upon public buildings commissioned by Senators and Emperors: temples, law courts, theaters, triumphal monuments, baths. In Ostia, the port-city of Rome, we are able to experience many aspects of daily life: commerce, housing, religion, entertainment. Pompeii represents a well-to-do Republican and early Imperial period city which was influenced by the Greeks and Romans and preserves some of the most magnificent frescoes in the world. The course is conducted entirely on site, including a one-day excursion to Pompeii (equivalent to two class meetings).
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ARTH 239-075: Art and Architecture of Europe: Ancient Greek Art and Architecture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 220 Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology
This upper level survey of Greek art and archaeology focuses on the visual culture of Ancient Greece in the Aegean and Western Mediterranean during the first millennium BCE. Includes a mandatory overnight trip to Naples and Paestum, which may require an extra fee.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-109: Art and Architecture of Europe: Ancient Roman Portraiture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 354 Ancient Roman Portraiture
Portraiture in Greece and Rome was a vital currency of social interaction and public engagement. The course will discuss all aspects of what made a portrait: facial characteristics, hairstyles, body types, and clothing, as well as the inscribed base and placement. The course will investigate themes like the uses of male and female portraits in public, the use of type-associations and role models, and the choices of statue types and status indicators. It will ask questions about who commissioned works, about workshop practices and distribution, and about the visual impact of techniques and form for the viewer, as well as why some portraits were destroyed or reworked.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-078: Art and Architecture of Europe: Ancient Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 290 Ancient Rome and Its Monuments
Survey course focusing on the city of Rome from its origins in the 8th century B.C. to the reign of Constantine (312-337 AD). The class is taught entirely on site at archaeological sites and in museums in a first-hand encounter with the monuments of the city. The topography of the city and its surviving monuments and artworks are used as the primary sources for an examination of the historical and political development of the city, and of the aesthetic, social and cultural meaning of its visual culture. This course requires an activities fee of €40.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-076: Art and Architecture of Europe: Baroque Rome and its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 298 Baroque Rome and Its Monuments
Painting, sculpture and architecture from the time of Caravaggio and the Carracci to Bernini and Cortona. Examines topics such as the Counter-Reformation and its impact on the arts, the rise of naturalism and illusionism, the design process and the function of drawings, theatricality and rhetoric. This course requires an activities fee of €25.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
ARTH 239-077: Art and Architecture of Europe: Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH196 Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art
A survey of art and architecture in Italy from the 14th to the early 16th century, this course gives primary emphasis to Florence as an artistic center while including exploration of the contributions of Siena, Rome, and Venice. The course is intended for students with little or no background in art history and will cover the principal artists and trends of the Italian Renaissance, from Giotto to Michelangelo. Lectures and on-site visits, including a trip to Florence, will help build a visual vocabulary of monuments in a general historical overview. Mandatory field trip may require a fee.
ARTH 239-104: Art and Architecture of Europe: Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 294 Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments
This course will provide the student with a clear grasp of the Renaissance city and a range of artwork produced in Rome from the end of the Great Schism (1417) to the beginning of the Council of Trent (1545). The majority of contact hours will be on-site and therefore a primary aim of this course is to develop skills of visual analysis and will place an emphasis on architecture. In-class lectures will introduce historical context and theory allowing the student to understand artworks studied conceptually and place commissions within a socio-historic framework. Ultimately, the student will become intimately acquainted with the topography, urban makeup and history of the city and its monuments. This course requires an activities fee of €25.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
BUAD 301-070: Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 301 Principles of Marketing
Management of the marketing functions, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, pricing, personal selling, and advertising. Emphasis on consumer and industrial markets.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 306-070: Introduction to Service and Operations Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 330 Operations Management
Analysis of major problems faced by operations managers at different levels of management. Topics include scheduling, forecasting, process design, inventory management and quality management.
Prerequisite: MATH201.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 309-070: Management and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MGT 310 Organizational Behavior
Discusses the processes and procedures used to manage individual performance effectively in organizational settings.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
Restrictions: Requires sophomore status.
BUAD 384-071: Global Business Environment (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 330 International Business
Evaluation of the elements of the national, international, and global environments that influence the context and conduct of international business. Emphasizes aspects of the cultural, political, economic, legal-regulatory, trade, financial, and institutional environments.
Restrictions: Requires junior status.
BUAD 473-070: Consumer Behavior (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 310 Consumer Behavior
Explores a variety of topics including: the decision processes associated with buying, consuming, and disposing of products, services, and ideas; social, cultural, and psychological influences on consumer decision making and consumption patterns; the relationship between consumer behavior and marketing decision making.
Prerequisite: BUAD301
BUAD 475-071: International Marketing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MKT 330 International Marketing
Analysis of the concepts and practices relating to the marketing of products and services internationally. Focus on the uncontrollable environmental forces facing an international marketer, issues relating to the standardization of marketing strategies across countries and the unique problems of specific international markets.
Prerequisite: BUAD 100 or BUAD 301
COMM 212-070: Oral Communication in Business (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 101 Public Speaking: Oral Rhetoric and Persuasion
Includes an analysis of the types and principles of the communication inherent in the business and professional setting; a concentration upon the development of presentational skills: analyzing audiences, questioning, interviewing, researching, supporting, organizing and delivering information; an opportunity to develop and present materials within dyads, small groups and public contexts.
Restrictions: Not open to communication and communication interest majors.
Credit not given for both COMM212 AND COMM350.
COMM 224-070: Introduction to Electronic Media Production (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 230 Foundations of Digital Video Production
This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.
COMM 245-071: Media and Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 220 Media, Culture, and Society
The relationship between media and culture; how media affect culture (i.e., socialization and role modeling); and exploration of new forms of mass communication.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
COMM 263-078: Communicative Behavior and Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMS 280 Intercultural Communications
Introduces key principles of interpersonal communication and discusses their application across diverse contexts.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
COMM 318-072: Topics In Media Communication (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CMS 330 Global Media
Focus on introductory areas of study in mass communication.
Restrictions: May be repeated two times for nine credits when topics vary.
ECON 101-071: Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 201 Principles of Microeconomics
Introduces supply and demand concepts with basic economic graphs. Examines models of perfect and imperfect competition and determinants of production price and quantity. Covers microeconomic issues such as the effect of government regulation and environmental problems.
Prerequisite: MATH114, MATH115, MATH221, MATH241 or higher.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 103-070: Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 202 Principles of Macroeconomics
Analyzes the determinants of unemployment, inflation, national income and policy issues relating to how the government alters unemployment and inflation through government spending, taxes and the money supply.
Prerequisite: ECON101
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
ECON 340-070: International Economics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 316 International Economics
Theory, problems and policy in international trade and finance with emphasis on developments since World War II.
Prerequisite: ECON 101 and ECON 103
Restrictions: ECON340 cannot be taken for credit after ECON441 and/or ECON443.
ECON 422-070: Econometric Methods and Models I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EC 360 Econometrics
Econometrics is the use of statistical tools to test economic models. This course will introduce students to the basic principles of econometrics and will provide them with hands-on practical experience in the field. The course starts with a review of statistical tools and continues with the analysis of simple and multiple regression, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Some of the teaching time will be spent in the computer lab, where students will learn how to work with software. (John Cabot Prerequisites: equivalent of Principles of Microeconomics, Principles of Macroeconomics, Statistics II.)
Prerequisite: Must earn a C- or better in ECON103; and one of ECON251, ECON255, ECON300 or ECON301; and MATH221, MATH232, or MATH241; and ONE OF MATH202, MATH205, MATH450, or STAT471.
ENGL 207-073: Introduction to Poetry (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 210 Introduction to Poetry and Poetics
Major theories concerning the nature and source of poetic talent and a consideration of the traditional aspects of prosody and poetic form. The course emphasis falls upon competence with poetry as an art form rather than upon the knowledge of particular poets or literary periods.This is a reading and writing intensive course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 209-070: Introduction to the Novel (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 205 Introduction to the Novel
Representative masterworks of fiction, emphasizing those of Europe and America.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 217-070: Introduction to Film (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: COM 210 Introduction to Cinema
Focuses on different techniques of acting, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound and color to assess how films encourage audiences to respond in the ways they do.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 280-070: Approaches to Literature for Non-majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 200 Introduction to Literature
This is a reading and writing intensive course. Presupposing no previous knowledge in particular of literature, the course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in the three genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned texts, use various critical approaches, and write several critical essays on specified readings.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 284-070: Shakespeare for Non-majors (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 245 Shakespeare
This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 with grade of C or better
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 300-073: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 215 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theories
Designed as an introduction to the theoretical approaches to literature, the course will stimulate students to think and write critically through the study of the principal topics of literary theory. The course will adopt both a historical approach, covering each theory in the chronological order of its appearance on the scene, and a critical approach - putting the theories to the test by applying them to a literary text. The course will also help students to move on to an advanced study of literature by introducing them to the research methods and tools for the identification, retrieval, and documentation of secondary sources.This is a reading and writing intensive course.
ENGL 305-071: Fiction Writing (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 285 Literature and Creative Writing: How to Read Like a Writer
To supplement their traditional university study of composition and literary analysis, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills at reading literature as a source of help in improving their own writing. Designed primarily for students interested in creative writing, this course focuses on the reading of literature from the point of view of the practice, or craft, of fiction writing. This is a reading and writing intensive course.
ENGL 324-072: Shakespeare (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 245 Shakespeare
This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance. This is a reading and writing intensive course.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ENGL 365-070: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements: Perceptions of Italy in Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 282 Italian Visions: Perceptions of Italy in Literature
This course attempts to chart the incredible influence of Italy on the imaginations of British, American and European writers of the 18th and 19th centuries. By the end of the course, we will be able to appreciate how much these writers are influenced not just by Italy, but by each other’s responses to its rich resources, despite their very different cultural or historical perspectives. Students should develop an appreciation and awareness of importance of the transcultural and transnational relationships between these writers. In addition to reading, students will make on-site visits to places relevant to the literature studied.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
Restrictions: May be taken up to three times when topics vary.
ENGL 372-074: Studies in Drama (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: EN 315 Selected Topics in American Literature
This course explores in some depth a particular period, theme(s), or genre in American Literature. Students study the major historical and cultural contexts out of which the works grew. An important aim of the course is to deepen students' knowledge of a certain topic through a choice of representative writers and works. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
FASH 355-070: Global Fashion Consumer and Retailers (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: BUS 330 International Business
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business, with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.
Prerequisite: PREREQ: FASH218 or BUAD301
FINC 311-075: Principles of Finance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FIN 301 Finance
This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The main areas covered include an overview of the financial system and the efficiency of capital markets, evaluation of financial performance, time value of money, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, international financial management, capital structure management, and the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct.
Prerequisite: ACCT207 and MATH201. PREREQ for HRIM majors: ACCT207 and MATH201 or STAT200.
FINC 312-070: Intermediate Financial Management (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FIN 302 Financial Management
This course builds on the first Finance and completes the overview of theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The course focuses on the interpretation of financial data ratios, cost of capital and long-term financial policy, short-term financial planning and management, issues in international finance, and mergers and acquisitions.
Prerequisite: MATH201 and MATH202 or MISY262 and FINC311.
FINC 415-075: International Finance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FIN 330 International Finance
Examines the international monetary environment and its impact on financial planning for the firm. Topics include exchange rates, currency restrictions, tax regulations, direct investment theory, capital budgeting, financing, risk management, and working capital management.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
Restrictions: Open to Junior and Senior Finance Majors only. Open to students whose major or minor requires this course.
FREN 105-075: Elementary French I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 101 Introductory French I
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in French. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
FREN 106-076: Elementary French II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 102 Introductory French II
A continuation of FR 101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory French I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
FREN 107-074: Intermediate French (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: FR 201 Intermediate French I
A continuation of French 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student’s ability to use French effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with French and francophone culture.
GREK 102-070: Elementary Ancient Greek II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: GRK 102 Introduction to Greek II
Completion of elementary Greek.
Prerequisite: GREK101 or equivalent.
HIST 102: Europe and the World since 1648 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HS 121 Intro to Western Civ II or HS 210 Nineteenth Cent Europe and the World
The transformations of Europe since the middle of the 17th century through cultural, social, and economic developments, revolutions, wars, and interactions with other parts of the world.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
HIST 339-071: Topics in Modern European History: Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: HS 366 Italy from Mussolini to the Crisis of the First Republic
Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic history of Europe, complemented by visits to museums and appropriate historic sites. Topics vary but usually focus on a sweeping historical survey of the particular European country in which a Study Abroad program is taking place.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Taught abroad only. May be repeated for credit when taken on different study abroad programs.
ITAL 105-070: Italian I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 101 Introductory Italian I
Introduction to the Italian language and development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.
ITAL 106-070: Italian II - Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 102 Introductory Italian II
Completion of basic Italian. Increasing mastery of the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: ITAL105 Two to three years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
ITAL 107-070: Italian III - Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 201 Intermediate Italian I
Review of grammar, continued practice in speaking and writing, reading texts of average difficulty.
Prerequisite: ITAL106 Four years of high school Italian acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Foreign Language
ITAL 200-070: Italy Today (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 202 Intermediate Italian II
Study contemporary Italian culture and review fundamental aspects of Italian language. Study of special problem areas. Some conversational practice.
Prerequisite: ITAL 107
ITAL 206-070: Culture Through Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 301 Advanced Grammar and Conversation
Discussion of topics drawn from contemporary Italian life. Designed for students who wish to broaden their knowledge of Italian culture while improving their oral and aural language skills.
Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Restrictions: Taught abroad only.
ITAL 211-070: Italian Reading and Composition: Short Fiction (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 302 Advanced Italian I
Reading and discussion of Italian short stories. Several short compositions. Grammar review where appropriate.
Prerequisite: ITAL200, ITAL205 or ITAL206
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ITAL 212-070: Italian Reading and Composition: Drama and Prose (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 302 Advanced Italian II
Reading and discussion of some major 20th-century plays and prose texts. Several short compositions. Grammar review where appropriate.
Prerequisite: ITAL200, ITAL205 or 206
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
ITAL 305-070: Advanced Italian Conversation (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 301 Advanced Italian I
Discussion of current cultural, social, and political topics in Italy.
Prerequisite: ITAL211 or ITAL212
ITAL 355-074: Special Topics: Elements of Italian Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 310 Elements of Italian Literature
The course will introduce students to the study of Italian literature.
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
ITAL 355: Special Topics: Italian Language and Gender (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 307 Italian Language and Gender
The course focuses on an advanced study of Italian language from a gender perspective. It aims to consolidate the language structures previously acquired as well as apprehend both the sociocultural implications of language, and how the use of language contributes in creating and recreating ideologies. Through exposure to a broad range of texts, students will be involved in the current heated debate concerning the revision of the Italian language in a gender-inclusivity and diversity key.
Prerequisite: Any 300-level Italian course
ITAL 355-071: Special Topics: Italian Language Through Literature (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 319 The Image of Rome in Italian Literature and Cinema
Explores an area of special interest in Italian literature or cultural studies. See http://primus.nss.udel.edu/CoursesSearch/ for topics.
Prerequisite: Any 300-level Italian course.
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
ITAL 366-070: Independent Study (0 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT281/382 Independent Study
Available for 1 to 3 credits. Student will verify with the department offering the study. Student will work with department faculty member to create specifics of the study.
Restrictions: Faculty permission only.
1-3 credit hours
ITAL 367-071: Seminar: Advanced Italian II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 302 Advance Italian II
ITAL 367-070: SEMINAR: INTERNSHIP (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: IT 398 Internship: Italian Studies Field
120-150 hours of non-paid, graded, credit-bearing employment experience at an Italian company, non-profit, or other organization, with academic expectations such as a journal and final report. Guided oversight by JCU faculty. Requires an application and employer interview; placement not guaranteed. Those who would like to complete an internship for credit must have at least junior standing and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

To be eligible to apply for a non-credit internship through JCU Career Services, students should have at least sophomore standing and a minimum GPA of 2.7.

See this page for details: JCU Internships
Prerequisite: For credit-bearing: any two 200-level Italian courses and minimum GPA of 3.0.
Restrictions: Proficiency in Italian is required.
ITAL 401-070: Advanced Italian Grammar and Stylistics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITAL 401 Advanced Writing
Introduction to the various written and spoken styles of contemporary Italian from colloquial to formal. Exercises in writing and speaking, with special emphasis on the grammatical structure of the Italian language. Some translation.
Prerequisite: Any two 300-level Italian courses
LATN 101-072: Elementary Latin I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LAT 101 Elementary Latin I
Prepares students to read ancient Roman literary works in the original language. Emphasizes building a basic vocabulary and acquiring essential grammar. Discussion of Roman culture and civilization.
LATN 102-071: Elementary Latin II (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: LAT 102 Elementary Latin II
Completion of elementary Latin.
Prerequisite: LATN 101 or equivalent.
Restrictions: One year of high school Latin acceptable in lieu of prerequisite.
LLCU 316-070: Classical Mythology: Gods, Heroes, and Monsters (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 260 Classical Mythology
Cosmological myths and heroic sagas in the literature and art of Greece and Rome. The influence of the mythology in later art and literature.
LLCU 330-071: Topics: World Literatures and Cultures: Italian Cinema (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITS/CMS 241 Italian Cinema
Study of modern Italian cultural history through cinema.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 330-072: Topics: World Literatures and Cultures: Literature & Society in Ancient Rome (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: CL 278 Literature & Society in Ancient Rome
Cultural, especially cross-cultural, study with primary emphasis on the historical development of the announced area, e.g., Nature in the Ancient World, Speculative Fiction, Transformation of a Myth.
Restrictions: May be repeated three times for credit when topics vary.
LLCU 330-070: Varying Authors, Themes, Movements: Studies in Medieval Catholic Culture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: RL 225 Mystics, Saints, Sinners: Studies in Medieval Catholic Culture
The course will begin by studying the theological foundations of self and world in the work of Augustine and Pseudo-Dionysius, before turning to an elucidation of central religious institutions such as the papacy and its relationship to imperial Rome, the monastery (we will study the rule of Saint Benedict and will visit a Benedictine monastery), the cathedral (we will visit San Giovanni in Laterano and Saint Peter’s), and the university (and the scholastic philosophy to which it gave rise). We will then turn to alternative expressions of medieval religious faith in the work of several mystics. Finally we will study the reactions of the Church to the rise of science in the fifteenth century (we will look at the trial of Giordano Bruno) and will end with an appraisal of the continuity and renewal of Renaissance Humanism.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
MATH 010: Intermediate Algebra (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 101 Intermediate Algebra
This course prepares students with the skills necessary for pre-calculus and college mathematics and statistics. Topics include solving equations (linear, rational, and quadratic) and inequalities, linear functions, systems of equations, and operations with polynomial, rational, and radical expressions.
Prerequisite: Students must achieve an acceptable score on the Math Placement Exam in accordance with current standards determined by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. See https://www.mathsci.udel.edu/courses-placement/ud-math-placement for more information.
Restrictions: RESTRICTIONS: Requires arithmetic and Algebra I skills. MATH010 does not earn credit towards graduation or any degree.
MATH 201-070: Introduction to Statistical Methods I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 208 Statistics
An introduction to descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory and inferential statistics. Included are: mean, median, mode and standard deviation; probability distributions, binomial probabilities and the normal distribution; problems of estimation; hypothesis testing, and an introduction to simple linear regression.
MATH 221-070: Calculus (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 198 Calculus I
This is a Standard Calculus course using an intuitive approach to the fundamental concepts in the calculus of one variable: limiting behaviors, difference quotients and the derivative, definite integrals, antiderivative and indefinite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
MSST 203-070: Introduction to Museums (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: AH 271 Curating Museums and Galleries
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of museums and to curating practices. Classes will discuss the cultural position of the museum, the evolution of its function, the different forms of display, the historical developments of the act of collecting, the position of the visitor and the role of the curator. The primary purpose of the course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary for understanding how museums produce knowledge and structure the ways in which history, geography, cultural difference, and social hierarchies are mapped.
PHIL 102-070: Introduction to Philosopy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 101 Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
In this course you will learn to use philosophical thinking to test and improve your opinions and your ability to evaluate the claims of important philosophers. Through the study and discussion of philosophical texts, classic or contemporary, you will grapple with issues of fundamental human importance and develop your capacities for careful reading, clear writing and speaking, and logical argumentation.
PHIL 203-074: Ethics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 235-2 Ethics
Study of moral value, moral obligation and moral virtue through comparison of

notable schools of ethical theory, including utilitarianism, existentialism,

Kantianism, classical Greek eudaimonism, pragmatism and Thomism.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
PHIL 244-070: Philosophy of Art (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 304 Philosophy of Art and Beauty
An introduction to main philosophic problems concerning art: the nature, evaluation and value of art.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
PHIL 301-070: Ancient Philosophy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PH 210 Ancient Philosophy
Beginnings of Western science and philosophy. The pre-Socratics, Sophists, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University History Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group B
PLSC 167-070: Food and Agriculture (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: NS 220 Food and Agriculture
Exploration of plant pathology as a biological science with its important ties to human welfare. Topics include food production systems, famine caused by plant diseases and their impact on human culture.
Prerequisite: Elective Credit.
POSC 150-071: Introduction to American Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL201 American Government
The foundations, principles and processes of American politics. Topics include the Constitution, political institutions (Congress, presidency, courts), parties, interest groups, campaigns, elections, public opinion and political participation.
POSC 240-070: Introduction to Global Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 209 World Politics
Introduction to key concepts and theories for understanding politics on a global level. Topics include the structure of the international system, causes of war and peace, economic globalization, international organizations and other issues and processes that cross national borders.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 270-070: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 223 Comparative Politics
Introduction to key concepts and patterns in comparative politics. Topics include democratic processes and democratization, economic and political development, political institutions, and civil society. Cases from different parts of the world are examined to provide a grounding in comparative analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
POSC 285-071: Introduction to Political Theory (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 210 Introduction to Political Theory
An introduction to the history of political thought, from Ancient Greece to the 19th century. Through a close reading of selected canonical texts, students will examine the evolution of ideas about democracy, liberty, equality, justice, political authority, the social contract, different conceptions of human nature and the role of the individual in society. The theorists examined may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, de Tocqueville and John Stuart Mill.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Arts/Humanities Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group A
POSC 309-074: Political Culture by Country: Italy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 215 Italian Politics and Society
Overview of the origins of the Italian republic, including reading through its constitution. Description of how its political system reflected the Cold War confrontation; examination of why and how it experienced dramatic changes at the beginning of the 1990's; observation and analysis of today’s main political competitors; discussion of the impact that soccer has had on Italian society
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group B
Restrictions: Offered only in conjunction with travel abroad programs. May be taken twice for credit when countries vary.
POSC 310-071: European Politics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 250 Western European Politics
Provides an overview of the politics in different European countries. We will seek to understand the differences between these countries and the patterns of continuity and change over time. We will also discuss whether one can speak of a European economic and social model.
POSC 313-070: American Foreign Policy (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 330 American Foreign Policy
A study of major foreign policy issues which have confronted the United States since World War II and the process of foreign policy formulation and implementation.
POSC 330-070: Political Terrorism (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 334 Terrorism and Counterterrorism
This course will provide the student with an understanding and basic foundation to: explain and compare the varying definitions of terrorism; distinguish the different types of terrorist motivations including left-wing, right-wing, ethnonationalist, separatists, and religious; differentiate terrorism from other forms of violence including political violence, guerilla warfare, insurgency, civil war, unconventional warfare, and crime; understand and describe the historical foundations of terrorism and apply them to modern terrorist events and methods being used to combat them.
POSC 339-076: European Union (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 315 Institutions and Policies of the European Union
The first section of the course explores the history of the European integrations process, the current institutions and the policies of the European Union. The second part provides an in-depth look at the challenges that the organization faces today and includes class discussions. The third section of the course explores the EU’s identity politics. Students will analyze the causes and the consequences of the organization’s legitimacy crisis and its “democratic deficit.”
POSC 408-070: International Organizations (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 212 International Organizations
Analysis of the organization of the international system, its structure, operating principles, formal and informal components.
POSC 442-070: Topics in European Politics: Western Europe since 1945 (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PL 250 Western European Politics
Examination of current trends in European politics. Topics will vary.
Restrictions: May be taken twice for credit when topics vary.
PSYC 100-070: General Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 101 General Psychology
Introduction to the process of psychological science. Includes coverage of research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, abnormal behavior and treatment, developmental psychology, and social and personality psychology.
PSYC 207-075: Research Methods (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 210 Introduction to Research Methods
Reviews the major issues involved in the design of psychological experiments. Includes measurement issues, internal and external validity of experiments, research with single subjects, and research ethics. Discusses both laboratory and field research.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in PSYC100 or NSCI100.
Restrictions: Open to PSYC and NSCI majors and minors.
PSYC 209-073: Measurement and Statistics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 208 Introduction to Statistical Analyses of Psychological Data
Theory and the application of statistical techniques to psychological data.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in PSYC100 or NSCI100 and one course in basic college mathematics.
Restrictions: Open to majors and minors in Psychology and Neuroscience majors.
PSYC 325-073: Principles of Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 221 Child Development
Survey of the interactions of physiological, psychological, and environmental factors determining psychological development. Consideration of major theories of child development.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100
PSYC 340-074: Cognition (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 307 Cognitive Psychology
Examination of how the mind works, covering topics such as perception, vision, attention, memory, language, concepts and decision making. Major themes include understanding the mind/brain relationship, using empirical data to develop and evaluate cognitive theories, and understanding the implications of cognitive research for everyday life.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC207 and in PSYC209 or substitutes (MATH202, MATH205, STAT200, SOCI301), except for Neuroscience majors.
Restrictions: Open to psychology majors and minors and Neuroscience majors.
PSYC 380-075: Psychopathology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 354 Abnormal Psychology
Exploration of research on diagnosis, etiology and treatment of major pathological disorders. Emphasis on original research articles, class discussion and assessment instruments, in addition to analysis of video-taped interviews with patients used to illustrate the disorders.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC207, and PSYC209 or substitutes (MATH202, MATH205, STAT200, SOCI301).
Restrictions: Open to majors and minors only.
PSYC 390-072: Social Psychology (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: PS 334 Social Psychology
An analysis of theory and research in social psychology including the topics of social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal, group and intergroup relations. Student-designed research projects including data analysis.
Prerequisite: Grades of C- or better in PSYC207, and PSYC209 or substitutes (MATH202, MATH205, STAT200, SOCI301).
Restrictions: Open to majors and minors only.
SOCI 204-070: Urban Communities (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/ITS 226 Rome: Modern City
Urbanization, rural-urban social differences and the organization of urban communities by race, class, ethnicity and stage in the life cycle. On-site classes will be held in a variety of Roman neighborhoods in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. They will include teacher-guided group discussions and observational activities to refine students’ skills of sociological analysis.
Satisfies the following requirements:
University Social Science Breadth
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SOCI 213-072: Men and Women in American Society (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/GDR 200 Introduction to Gender Studies
Designed to provide students with a sociological framework for analyzing sex and gender relations in contemporary American society. Topics include the social construction of gender, patterns of sex-role socialization, gender stratification in the paid work force, gender relations in the family and other social institutions.
SOCI 267-073: Sociology Seminar (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: ITS 220 Italian Food Culture
Lecture
SOCI 302-071: Social Deviance (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SOSC/LAW 236 Crime, Deviance, and Media
Defining deviance, research on deviance and explaining deviance. Cross-listed with CRJU 302.
Satisfies the following requirements:
Arts and Sciences - Group C
SPAN 105-075: Spanish I - Elementary (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 101 Introductory Spanish I
This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Spanish. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
SPAN 106-073: Spanish II - Elementary/Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 102 Introductory Spanish II
A continuation of SPAN101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Spanish I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.
SPAN 107-075: Spanish III - Intermediate (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
A continuation of SPAN 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student’s ability to use Spanish effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with Spanish and Hispanic culture.
STAT 200-070: Basic Statistical Practice (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 208 Statistics I
Uses data from a variety of disciplines to explore topics in statistical data analysis, estimation, and inference. The following topics will be covered: graphical displays; measures of position, central tendency, and variability; basic probability rules; discrete probability distributions; binomial distribution; normal and standard normal probability distributions; sampling distributions; the t distribution; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for one mean or proportion; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for two means or proportions; correlation and simple linear regression.
STAT 470-070: Probability Theory in Statistics (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: MA 492 Mathematical Statistics
Basic and conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, joint distributions, transformations, distributions of statistics, Central Limit Theorem.
THEA 226: Fundamentals of Acting I (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: DR 101 Introduction to Theatrical Performance
Exploration of basic elements of the actor's art and craft so as to deepen and broaden the experience of viewing the theatre. May utilize theatre games, basic text work, improvisation, and lecture/demonstrations.
UNIV 362-076: Experiential Learning: Internship (3 credits)
Provider Equivalent: Varies by internship
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Component: Independent Study

Learning experience on or off campus under supervision of faculty member. Instructional learning out of class and beyond existing department courses. Non-major required discovery learning experiences such as service learning, fieldwork, co-op, apprenticeship, internship, and independent study.

JCU REQUIREMENTS: You must be accepted at JCU for the semester (or summer session) in which you would like to get the internship. Internships must be obtained through the JCU Center for Career Services (CSC). Junior standing (60 credits completed) Minimum GPA of 3.0.

FOR-CREDIT INTERNSHIP COURSE: 20 hours of in-class instruction. 150 minimum number of hours worked verified by the CSC upon completion of the internship. A daily internship log. In-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization. A 2500-3000 word "White Paper" presenting a solution to a problem encountered by their employer. Positive evaluations from your employer and the For-credit class professor. JCU internship page
UNIV 373-018: Study Abroad - Rome, Italy (0 credits) pass/fail
Students are asked to reflect upon changes in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that occur due to their study abroad experience and are required to complete a brief post-program assessment of these changes
Satisfies the following requirements:
Discovery Learning
Requirements
The Semester in Rome is designed for undergraduate students regardless of major with a minimum 2.670 grade point average at the time of application.

Full-time enrollment status of 12 or more credits is required during the program.
For all participants, a formal application is necessary, including at least one recommendation. An interview may be conducted in person or by Zoom.

A transcript is required from Non-UD applicants only. Non-UD students, please email a copy of your official transcript to the Program Coordinator.

Study abroad at the University of Delaware is highly competitive. Please review the study abroad acceptance process. If you are not selected for your first choice program, we encourage you to apply to another program.
Costs
How much does it cost?.
  • University of Delaware Tuition/Fees for one Spring Semester
  • Travel Study Program Fee
    • Usually covers: housing, all program-related excursions and some meals (check with the program's faculty director for details).
    • Does NOT cover: airfare to/from the program site and ground transportation to/from the U.S. departure airport. For planning purposes only, we estimate roundtrip airfare to be approximately $1,400.00.
  • Plan ahead for how to pay for travel study, and make sure you understand the costs associated with your program.
When and how do I pay?
If you are offered acceptance to the program, you will have 3 days to withdraw without financial penalty. After the 3 days have passed, you will be officially accepted to the program, and CGPS will post the full Program Fee and Tuition/Fees to your UD student account.
  • An initial payment of $1000.00 will be due in mid-October.
  • The balance of the Program Fee and Tuition/Fees will be due in early January.
  • Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
  • All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable.
Other important things to note:
  • Program Fees are subject to change until the group's departure date. Final Program Fees may increase due to unforeseen local cost increases, fluctuations in exchange rates, or changes in the group size.
  • CGPS reserves the right to cancel a program at any time due to under-enrollment, safety/health/security issues, staffing issues, or any other relevant reason. If your program is cancelled, you will receive a full refund of all Program Fees paid.
Delaware ResidentNon-Delaware Resident
Estimated Tuition based on current year$7,020.00$18,840.00
Estimated Program Fee$11,000.00$11,000.00
UD Registration & Activities Fee$0.00$0.00
Total to be charged to UD account (estimated)$18,020.00$29,840.00
Plus Airfare Estimate (purchased separately)$1,400.00$1,400.00
The rates above may not apply to you if you are a UD graduate student during the time you are studying abroad. Please refer to http://www1.udel.edu/finaid/rates.html for the appropriate rates.
The University of Delaware’s differential charge for Engineering, Nursing and Business & Economics students does not apply to winter or summer session and is waived for students enrolled in semester- or year-long study abroad and exchange programs sponsored by the University.
Scholarships
Financial need-based scholarships are available to UD undergraduates on a competitive basis. To be considered, students must have a current FAFSA on-file with Student Financial Services. For more details, please see our scholarships page.
Deadlines
All charges, once posted to your account, are considered non-refundable. Payments are submitted through My Finances in UDSIS.
Submit Program Application by 5pm onSeptember 20, 2024
Acceptance and Scholarship AnnouncedOctober 02, 2024
$1,000.00 Initial Payment Due *mid-October
Program Fee Balance, Tuition and Fees Dueearly January
*All students will receive an email when they are accepted to a program and will have 10 days from that notification to make their $1,000.00 Initial Payment.
Contacts
Eileen Peters
Study Abroad Coordinator
121 E Delaware Ave
302-831-4065
eqpeters@udel.edu
File Downloads
Interest Meeting Power Point

Program information is subject to change at any time. Please check this web site periodically for updates.